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Third Reich Wonder Weapons & UFO's [FULL VIDEO]


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In UFOlogy, conspiracy theory, science fiction, and comic book stories, claims or stories have circulated linking UFOs to Nazi Germany. The German UFO theories describe supposedly successful attempts to develop advanced aircraft or spacecraft prior to and during World War II, and further assert the post-war survival of these craft in secret underground bases in Antarctica, South America or the United States, along with their creators.[1] Within our expanded media, various code-names or sub-classifications of Nazi UFO craft have been identified as Rundflugzeug, Feuerball, Diskus, Haunebu, Hauneburg-Geräte, V7, Vril, Kugelblitz (not related to the self-propelled anti-aircraft gun of the same name), Andromeda-Geräte, Flugkreisel, Kugelwaffen, and Reichsflugscheiben. Accounts appear to have been as early as 1950, likely inspired by historical German development of specialized engines such as Viktor Schauberger's "Repulsine" around the time of WWII. Elements of these claims have been widely incorporated into various works of fictional and purportedly non-fictional media, including video games and documentaries, often mixed with more substantiated information. German UFO literature very often conforms largely to documented history on the following points: The 3rd Reich claimed the territory of New Swabia in Antarctica, sent an expedition there in 1938, and planned others. The 3rd Reich conducted research into advanced propulsion technology, including rocketry, Viktor Schauberger's engine research, flying wing craft and the Arthur Sack A.S.6 experimental circular winged aircraft. Some UFO sightings during World War II, particularly those known as foo fighters, were thought by the Allies to be prototype enemy aircraft designed to harass Allied aircraft through electromagnetic disruption; a technology similar to today's electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons. Die Glocke (German for "The Bell") was a purported top secret Nazi scientific technological device, secret weapon, or Wunderwaffe. First described by Polish journalist and author Igor Witkowski in Prawda o Wunderwaffe (2000), it was later popularized by military journalist and author Nick Cook as well as by writers such as Joseph P. Farrell and Jeremy Robinson. Farrell, and others such as Peter Levenda, associates it with Nazi occultism and antigravity or free energy research.[citation needed] According to Patrick Kiger writing in National Geographic, Die Glocke has become a "popular subject of speculation" and a following similar to science fiction fandom exists around it and other alleged Nazi "miracle weapons" of Wunderwaffen. Mainstream reviewers such as former aerospace scientist David Myhra express skepticism that such a device ever actually existed



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