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Ackergill Tower, Most Haunted Scotland Tower Ghosts and Hauntings

SUBSCRIBE & JOIN THE FAMILY. Please follow us on twitter at like our facebook page at #!/pages/Dorset-Ghost-Investigators/259833150723729Paranormal activity at Ackergill Tower:Ackergill Tower is said to be haunted by the ghost of Helen Gunn, who was abducted by John Keith for her beauty. She flung herself, or fell, from the highest tower to escape her abductor's advances. Supposedly her ghost is still seen, wearing a long red rustling ball gown and a tall head of black Tower (or Ackergill Castle) is a castle located north of Wick, Caithness, in northern Scotland. It is a category A listed building. The property is currently operated as a hotel and events venue, and is owned by Clarenco of Ackergill Tower:The Clan Keith, under John Keith of Inverugie, inherited the lands of Ackergill in 1354 from the Cheynes family. Ackergill Tower may have been built by his son, but was first mentioned in legend relates the tale of a young woman by the name of Helen Gunn, who was abducted by John Keith for her beauty. She flung herself, or fell, from the highest tower to escape her abductor's advances. Supposedly her ghost is still seen, wearing a long red rustling ball gown and a tall head of black hair. This was in the late 14th or early 15th century and is said to have been the true beginning for all feuding between the Gunns and the Keiths. It led to the Battle of Champions in either 1478 or 1464, a judicial combat which led to a massacre of the Gunns by the Keiths at the chapel of St Tear (or Tayre) just east of the and Sinclairs:In 1547, the Sinclairs of Girnigoe attacked and seized the castle. Mary of Guise, then Regent of Scotland, granted the Sinclairs remission for this, and returned Ackergill Tower to the Keiths. She later installed Laurence Oliphant, 4th Lord Oliphant, as keeper of Ackergill in 1549. The Sinclairs again captured the castle in 1556, for which they were again granted 1593, Robert Keith, brother to William Keith, 6th Earl Marischal (who rightfully owned the tower), seized Ackergill by force, for which he was declared a rebel, and the castle was returned to the Earl. In 1598, another Keith, one John Keith of Subster, attacked the tower in the dead of night, taking its occupants by surprise and capturing the 1612, the Sinclairs acquired Ackergill Tower once again, but through legal means, when it was sold to the Earl of Caithness by the Earl Marischal. However, by 1623 it was under assault once more, when it was besieged by Sir Robert Gordon during his feud with George Sinclair, 5th Earl of Caithness, but the Sinclairs surrendered the castle before any assault took 1651, Oliver Cromwell may have used Ackergill Castle to garrison his troops during his siege of the Keith's Dunnottar Castle, when he was hunting for the Honours of Scotland. In 1676, John Campbell, 2nd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland took possession of Ackergill Tower in repayment of debts owed to him by the history of Ackergill Tower:John Campbell put Ackergill Tower up for sale in 1699, and it was bought by Sir William Dunbar of Hempriggs. The Dunbars began extensive renovations, including the addition of a lean-to-shaped extension to the tower. In the mid-19th century, further additions including a cap house were made by the architect David Bryce on behalf of George Sutherland Dunbar, 7th Lord Duffus. It remained in the hands of the Dunbars of Hempriggs until 1986, when it was sold. The castle underwent a two-year period of restoration work before opening as an exclusive hotel and business venue. The tower was sold again in 2009, and the new owners, Clarenco LLP, acquired a five-star rating in 2012 having spent 2 million upgrading castle:Ackergill Tower is a five-story oblong tower house. The four-storey wing to the rear was added in the early 18th You to this source: credit to:Kevin MacLeod ()".Licensed under Creative Commons "Attribution " for Images in video:This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Unported LicenseThis file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike Generic license.



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