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Spy Drone Can See What You are Wearing From 17,500 Feet


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Rise Of The Drones: new camera developed by the Pentagon's research arm was highlighted in a recent special on PBS' "Nova" in an episode called "Rise of the Drones." It's a camera system so detailed it can discern specific movements and even what a subject is Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Autonomous Real-Time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System (ARGUS) has billion pixels ( gigapixels), making it the world' highest resolution camera. The sensors on the camera are so precise, PBS stated it is the equivalent to the capabilities of 100 Predator drones in a medium the clip from PBS, it is said this is the first time the government has allowed information to be shared about these capabilities."It is important for the public to know that some of these capabilities exist," Yiannis Antonaides with contractor BAE Systems said in the clip, but noted the sensor itself cannot be revealed. "Because we are not allowed to expose some of the pieces that make up this sensor, so you get to look a pretty plastic curtains."The technology allows the user to open up a specific windows of interest in the camera's view while still keeping up an image of the larger picture (sort of like split screen). Antonaides explained that the colored boxes in the image show that the sensor recognized moving objects. "You can see individuals crossing the street. You can see individuals walking in parking lots. There's actually enough resolution to see the people waving their arms or walking around or what kind of clothes they wear," he said. PBS noted that ARGUS can actually see much more details than just attire. It can see objects as small as six inches. At 2:23 in the clip, Antonaides points out that from 17,500 feet, a white object in the field of view is a bird flying. PBS pointed out that DARPA put a time crunch on creating the camera, which lead Antonaides to look into technology that you probably have in your purse or pocket at this very moment. Taking similar imaging systems used in smartphones and putting 368 together, is essentially how Antonaides and other engineers at BAE Systems created ARGUS. It is this "mosaic" of cameras that allows the system to zoom in on specific sections in extreme detail. As for data, the system stores up to 1 million terabytes a day. Putting this into perspective, PBS notes this is equal to 5,000 hours of HD footage."You can go back and say 'I would like to know what happened at this particular location three days, two hours, four minutes ago' and it would actually show you what happened as if you were watching it live," Antonaides is still classified information whether ARGUS has been used in the field yet."If we had our choice, we would like ARGUS to be over the same area 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That's not very achievable with manned platforms. This is where UAVs come in and they're absolutely the perfect platform," Antonaides Barack Obama's authorization of military aid to the Syrian rebels "dramatically" increases support for the opposition, the White House said Friday, while acknowledging that it will take time for the supplies to reach fighters struggling in their clashes with Syrian President Bashar officials said the new aid would include weapons and ammunition and comes in response to firmer evidence from the White House of chemical weapons use by Assad's regime."There's already material that's been flowing to the opposition and that will continue in the weeks to come," said Ben Rhodes, Obama's deputy national security has said the use of chemical weapons would cross a "red line," suggesting greater American intervention. While a small percentage of the 93,000 people reportedly killed in Syria are said to have died from chemical weapons intelligence puts the number at 100 to 150 the White House views the deployment of the deadly agents as a flouting of international said Obama made the decision to authorize military aid to the rebels over the past few weeks. He also defended the president's caution on the issue, saying "these are not steps the president takes lightly." AP Photo/Pablo Martinez MonsivaisPresident Barack Obama gestures as he View Full Size The History of Syria in 60 Seconds Watch Video White House Confirms Syria's Use of Chemical Weapons Watch Video



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3 comments

  • properREDeye#

    properREDeye October 3, 2013 2:07:13 PM CEST

    You should be more angry than scared that your tax money is being used for such right infringing yet trivial means of inward spying and is obvioulsy not targeted to be beneficial to the general population, bloating limited functionality sectors of publically paid for departments. Why do people not see that this is a bad thing? When they first started putting up security cameras in town centres people hit the roof about it, are we now so numb and subdued that we will just accept this as the norm?

  • djnick18#

    djnick18 October 3, 2013 9:49:31 AM CEST

    Scary Sh**T !!!! ...
    George Orwell .. I Salute You !! .. you were "Bang-On".

  • SaniaMirza#

    SaniaMirza October 2, 2013 11:43:56 PM CEST

    my classmate's step-sister makes $82/h hourly on the internet. She has been out of a job for 6 months but last month her pay was $20983 just working on the internet for a few hours. Read more on this site..
    >>>>>>>>>W­W­W.W­O­R­K­S­2­3.C­ℴ­ℳ



 
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