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The Prophecies of Mitar Tarabich

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Mitar Tarabich (1829–1899), an illiterate peasant from the small Serbian village of Kremna, experienced occasional prophetic visions. Being a religious person and having a local Serbian orthodox priest for a godfather, he told this priest about his episodes of "seeing into the future".

The priest, Zaharije Zaharich (1836–1918), wrote down everything in a small notebook, which was damaged by fire in 1943 when his family home was destroyed by the occupying Bulgarian Army. This text is now in the possession of the family of Zaharich’s great-grandson, Mr Dejan Malenkovich. Tarabich’s prophecies were literally very straightforward, unlike the prophecies of Nostradamus (1503–1566) that seem to be encrypted with the latest 1,024-bit encryption technology.

Tarabich’s best-known prophecy has to do with a series of political events in 19th-century Serbia. He predicted a sequence of events, spanning a course of decades, that eventually led to the removal of the ruling Obrenovich family from the Serbian royal throne. This prophecy came to be known in the Balkan region as "the Black Prophecy", and it played out as predicted.
You should note that Tarabich’s words are translated from Serbo-Croatian and that the translation is not necessarily in its final form. You may notice that some of the phrasing in the quotes is awkward and rough; this is an accurate reflection of his rural accent.

Tarabich’s words come from conversations with his godfather Zaharich, so you should be aware that any references to "you" or "your descendants" relate to Zaharich (the priest) specifically. When Tarabich says "us" he means the Serbs, but he does not distinguish between Croats, Serbs, Slovenians, etc. To him, anyone who spoke his language was a Serb.

Perhaps it is also important to note that we don’t really know how much of Tarabich’s prophecies was influenced by his own opinion. Some of the adjectives used to describe the people and events he saw could be a reflection of his "peasant-like" interpretation of those events (examples: intelligent, brave, honest, horrible, calamity, etc.)



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