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Low Altitude Sprayer Plane filmed by "3rdEyeDear"

  • Adjuk
  • uploaded: Aug 17, 2010
  • Hits: 170

Description:

Originally posted here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YP13vwL5sUk
The official story is bifurcated. On the one hand those who know the atmospheric processes and differences between condensation trails and clouds are now called "conspiracy theorists". On the other hand we are given the official explanation of "geoengineering" and "solar radiation management", whereby planes spray the atmosphere with toxic particulates for the purpose of blotting out the Sun (while poisoning our air supply).

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200910/cmselect/cmsctech/221/...
Note that on page 3 of the above link it says: "THE INJECTION OF SULPHATE AEROSOLS into the stratosphere TO MIMIC THE COOLING EFFECT CAUSED BY LARGE VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS."

The document was published just a month BEFORE the volcanic eruption reports that grounded flights across Europe in April 2010.

This video clip shows a plane making a cloud at low altitude. Spraying at low-level does not fit the "geoengineering" explanation. Why spray so low over populated areas? What is the synthetic cloud composed of? Why is the public's lifestyle ("carbon footprint") being blamed for "human-caused" climate change when the real culprits spraying away go unmentioned?

Watch "Don't Talk About the Weather" (playlist on this channel) to see why we need answers now.



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8 comments

  • Bcgolddigger#

    Bcgolddigger August 17, 2010 9:05:14 PM CEST

    Condensation from engine exhaustThe main products of hydrocarbon fuel combustion are carbon dioxide and water vapor. At high altitudes this water vapour emerges into a cold environment, and the local increase in water vapor can push the water content of the air past saturation point. The vapour then condenses into tiny water droplets and/or deposits into ice. These millions of tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals form the vapour trail or contrails. The vapor's need to condense accounts for the contrail forming some way behind the aircraft's engines. At high altitudes, supercooled water vapor requires a trigger to encourage deposition or condensation. The exhaust particles in the aircraft's exhaust act as this trigger, causing the trapped vapor to rapidly turn to ice crystals. Exhaust vapour trails or contrails usually occur above 8000 meters (26,000 feet), where the temperature is below -40°C (-40°F).[3]Condensation from decreases in pressureMain article: Wingtip vorticesAs a wing generates lift, it causes a vortex to form at each wingtip, and sometimes also at the tip of each wing flap. These wingtip vortices persist in the atmosphere long after the aircraft has passed. The reduction in pressure and temperature across each vortex can cause water to condense and make the cores of the wingtip vortices visible. This effect is more common on humid days. Wingtip vortices can sometimes be seen behind the wing flaps of airliners during takeoff and landing, and during landing of the Space shuttle.The visible cores of wingtip vortices contrast with the other major type of contrails which are caused by the combustion of fuel. Contrails produced from jet engine exhaust are seen at high altitude, directly behind each engine. By contrast, the visible cores of wingtip vortices are usually seen only at low altitude where the aircraft is travelling slowly after takeoff or before landing, and where the ambient humidity is higher. They trail behind the wingtips and wing flaps rather than behind the engines.During high-thrust settings the fan blades at the intake of a turbo-fan engine reach transonic speeds, causing a sudden drop in air pressure. This creates the condensation fog (inside the intake) which is often observed by air travelers during takeoff. For more information see the Prandtl%u2013Glauert singularity effect.Information from: Wikipedia.Now try to argue this point Adjuk

  • Bcgolddigger#

    Bcgolddigger August 17, 2010 9:05:12 PM CEST

    Condensation from engine exhaustThe main products of hydrocarbon fuel combustion are carbon dioxide and water vapor. At high altitudes this water vapour emerges into a cold environment, and the local increase in water vapor can push the water content of the air past saturation point. The vapour then condenses into tiny water droplets and/or deposits into ice. These millions of tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals form the vapour trail or contrails. The vapor's need to condense accounts for the contrail forming some way behind the aircraft's engines. At high altitudes, supercooled water vapor requires a trigger to encourage deposition or condensation. The exhaust particles in the aircraft's exhaust act as this trigger, causing the trapped vapor to rapidly turn to ice crystals. Exhaust vapour trails or contrails usually occur above 8000 meters (26,000 feet), where the temperature is below -40°C (-40°F).[3]Condensation from decreases in pressureMain article: Wingtip vorticesAs a wing generates lift, it causes a vortex to form at each wingtip, and sometimes also at the tip of each wing flap. These wingtip vortices persist in the atmosphere long after the aircraft has passed. The reduction in pressure and temperature across each vortex can cause water to condense and make the cores of the wingtip vortices visible. This effect is more common on humid days. Wingtip vortices can sometimes be seen behind the wing flaps of airliners during takeoff and landing, and during landing of the Space shuttle.The visible cores of wingtip vortices contrast with the other major type of contrails which are caused by the combustion of fuel. Contrails produced from jet engine exhaust are seen at high altitude, directly behind each engine. By contrast, the visible cores of wingtip vortices are usually seen only at low altitude where the aircraft is travelling slowly after takeoff or before landing, and where the ambient humidity is higher. They trail behind the wingtips and wing flaps rather than behind the engines.During high-thrust settings the fan blades at the intake of a turbo-fan engine reach transonic speeds, causing a sudden drop in air pressure. This creates the condensation fog (inside the intake) which is often observed by air travelers during takeoff. For more information see the Prandtl%u2013Glauert singularity effect.Information from: Wikipedia.Now try to argue this point Adjuk

  • Bcgolddigger#

    Bcgolddigger August 17, 2010 9:04:58 PM CEST

    Condensation from engine exhaustThe main products of hydrocarbon fuel combustion are carbon dioxide and water vapor. At high altitudes this water vapour emerges into a cold environment, and the local increase in water vapor can push the water content of the air past saturation point. The vapour then condenses into tiny water droplets and/or deposits into ice. These millions of tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals form the vapour trail or contrails. The vapor's need to condense accounts for the contrail forming some way behind the aircraft's engines. At high altitudes, supercooled water vapor requires a trigger to encourage deposition or condensation. The exhaust particles in the aircraft's exhaust act as this trigger, causing the trapped vapor to rapidly turn to ice crystals. Exhaust vapour trails or contrails usually occur above 8000 meters (26,000 feet), where the temperature is below -40°C (-40°F).[3]Condensation from decreases in pressureMain article: Wingtip vorticesAs a wing generates lift, it causes a vortex to form at each wingtip, and sometimes also at the tip of each wing flap. These wingtip vortices persist in the atmosphere long after the aircraft has passed. The reduction in pressure and temperature across each vortex can cause water to condense and make the cores of the wingtip vortices visible. This effect is more common on humid days. Wingtip vortices can sometimes be seen behind the wing flaps of airliners during takeoff and landing, and during landing of the Space shuttle.The visible cores of wingtip vortices contrast with the other major type of contrails which are caused by the combustion of fuel. Contrails produced from jet engine exhaust are seen at high altitude, directly behind each engine. By contrast, the visible cores of wingtip vortices are usually seen only at low altitude where the aircraft is travelling slowly after takeoff or before landing, and where the ambient humidity is higher. They trail behind the wingtips and wing flaps rather than behind the engines.During high-thrust settings the fan blades at the intake of a turbo-fan engine reach transonic speeds, causing a sudden drop in air pressure. This creates the condensation fog (inside the intake) which is often observed by air travelers during takeoff. For more information see the Prandtl%u2013Glauert singularity effect.Information from: Wikipedia.Now try to argue this point Adjuk

  • Bcgolddigger#

    Bcgolddigger August 17, 2010 9:00:48 PM CEST

    Condensation from engine exhaustThe main products of hydrocarbon fuel combustion are carbon dioxide and water vapor. At high altitudes this water vapour emerges into a cold environment, and the local increase in water vapor can push the water content of the air past saturation point. The vapour then condenses into tiny water droplets and/or deposits into ice. These millions of tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals form the vapour trail or contrails. The vapor's need to condense accounts for the contrail forming some way behind the aircraft's engines. At high altitudes, supercooled water vapor requires a trigger to encourage deposition or condensation. The exhaust particles in the aircraft's exhaust act as this trigger, causing the trapped vapor to rapidly turn to ice crystals. Exhaust vapour trails or contrails usually occur above 8000 meters (26,000 feet), where the temperature is below -40°C (-40°F).[3]Condensation from decreases in pressureMain article: Wingtip vorticesAs a wing generates lift, it causes a vortex to form at each wingtip, and sometimes also at the tip of each wing flap. These wingtip vortices persist in the atmosphere long after the aircraft has passed. The reduction in pressure and temperature across each vortex can cause water to condense and make the cores of the wingtip vortices visible. This effect is more common on humid days. Wingtip vortices can sometimes be seen behind the wing flaps of airliners during takeoff and landing, and during landing of the Space shuttle.The visible cores of wingtip vortices contrast with the other major type of contrails which are caused by the combustion of fuel. Contrails produced from jet engine exhaust are seen at high altitude, directly behind each engine. By contrast, the visible cores of wingtip vortices are usually seen only at low altitude where the aircraft is travelling slowly after takeoff or before landing, and where the ambient humidity is higher. They trail behind the wingtips and wing flaps rather than behind the engines.During high-thrust settings the fan blades at the intake of a turbo-fan engine reach transonic speeds, causing a sudden drop in air pressure. This creates the condensation fog (inside the intake) which is often observed by air travelers during takeoff. For more information see the Prandtl%u2013Glauert singularity effect.Information from: Wikipedia

  • Adjuk#
  • Adjuk#

    Adjuk August 17, 2010 8:27:49 PM CEST

    Oops - I don't think you watched the video. The plane is too low for a contrail to form. It is at the level of cumulus cloud - not cirrus. You need to check out some things...

  • Bcgolddigger#

    Bcgolddigger August 17, 2010 8:22:22 PM CEST

    It's called a Con Trail, it's made up of water vapor and exhaust gases such as CO2. No news here. Haven't you ever seen a rainbow well this is a cloudbow, that's all. I haven't seen anyone filming car exhaust leaving a tail pipe on a cold day. There I've just given you another topic to go after. Yes do it now! go and film cars exhausting. Do it man, you'll be the first.

  • Bobthegreater#

    Bobthegreater August 17, 2010 5:45:39 PM CEST

    Great vid - could you repost the link to the parliament.uk site - the one above doesn't work...CheersBob



 
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