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The Great Work of The Masonic Beehive

  • Uploaded by Unitb166er on Jan 15, 2011
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This video discusses the occult and esoteric meanings behind the symbolic beehive in Freemasonry, Fabian Society and so on, and the ancient religion which is behind it. We are living in a time when everything is all about control. Controlled by corporations headed toward a socialistic utopia. Music by Explosions in the Sky.

Source;http://www.themasonictrowel.com/Articles/degrees/degree_3rd_files/the_beehive_gltx.htm

As a Masonic symbol the Bee Hive receives very little attention in the Texas Masonic ritual though it is part of the Master Mason’s degree. The Bee Hive is one of the many symbols on the Master’s Carpet described in this degree. Unfortunately, it is part of the monitorial work and its explanation is rarely presented as part of the Master Mason’s lecture.

No one knows when the Bee Hive entered the Masonic ritual as a symbol. However, the bee in Masonry is mentioned as early as 1724 in an expose printed in Ireland. In The Early Masonic Catechisms it is said, “A Bee has in all Ages and Nations been the Grand Hierogliphick of Masonry, because it excells all other living Creatures in the Contrivance and Commodiousness of its Habitation or Combe.”

The early 19th century lecture of the Master’s degree contained the following. “The Bee Hive is an emblem of industry, and recommends the practice of that virtue to all created beings, from the highest seraph in the heavens, to the lowest reptile of the dust. It teaches us, that as we come into the world rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in want, especially when it is in our power to relieve them, without inconvenience to ourselves.”

Jones’ Freemason’s Guide and Compendium also indicates the early use of the Bee Hive as a Masonic symbol. “On old jewels, tracing-boards, lodge furniture, banners, summonses, certificates, etc., the beehive with its flying bees is often a prominent symbol, and in at least one case is to be found in a lodge seal…. As far back as 1724-27, a Masonic pamphlet speaks at length of the bee and the beehive as a symbol.”

The bee is a very energetic insect that never appears to rest from sunup to sundown. As a result, the bee and the bee hive have long been symbols of industry or work. Masonically, the Bee Hive is an emblem of industry and the lecture strongly recommends that virtue be practiced by everyone. It suggests that we should never be idle, especially when we can assist our fellow man by being industrious.

The bee is a hard and tireless worker, not for himself but for the swarm. The bee works in complete cooperation with the other bees and does so without dissension. The bee protects the queen, refuses admittance to enemies, builds, makes honey, and lives in a society ruled by order. Man must work as a unit to accomplish great things. The builders of old worked as a unit to build the great cathedrals. He could not work alone and expect to build the mighty edifice. Every man had to do his part, take pride in his assignments, and work in cooperation to complete the cathedrals.

To close the discussion, the following description of the Bee Hive is taken from the Monitor of the Lodge.

The Bee Hive is an emblem of industry, and recommends the practice of that virtue to all created beings, from the highest seraph in the heavens to the lowest reptile of the dust. It teaches us that, as we come into the world endowed as rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our fellow creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them, without inconvenience to ourselves.

When we take a survey of nature, we view man in his infancy more helpless and indigent than the brute creation; he lies languishing for days, months and years, totally incapable of providing sustenance for himself, or guarding against the attack of wild beasts of the field, or sheltering himself from the inclemencies of the weather.

It might have pleased the great Creator of heaven and earth to have made man independent of all other beings; but, as dependence is one of the strongest bonds of society, mankind were made dependent upon each other for protection and security, as they thereby enjoy better opportunities of fulfilling the duties of reciprocal love and friendship. Thus was man formed for social and active life; the noblest part of the work of God; and he that will so demean himself as not to be endeavoring to add to the common stock of knowledge and understanding, may be deemed a drone in the hive of nature, a useless member of society, and unworthy of our protection as Masons.

As Masons, we must imitate the bee, be industrious, work with others and for others, take pride in our vocations, obey the rules of our society, and strive to add to our body of knowledge and understanding. Otherwise we are useless members of society.



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