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Inbound Planetary Object


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jcattera | February 12, 2011

I've been monitoring this dark planetary object for over 2-3 months now, and I have discovered it is now much larger in size! This inbound planetary object can possibly explain the growing numbers of earthquakes over the past year. Just today, we've had 2 major Earthquakes in the upper 6 range in Chile, and on 2/10/11, we had a 6.7 and 6.8 EQ's near Indonesia.

Please download the data for yourselves to confirm (Stereo HI1 Behind) telescope all in 1024x1024 resolution.

http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images

If you want to see the closer zoomed in view of this dark object please see this addendum video...

URGENT!!! A Closer Look - Dark Planetary Object (you will see a smaller object orbiting it)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3YXbknzwu8

Dark Planetary Object Update - Jan 10, 2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwqLoKhaesc

Nicknamed "Nemesis" or "The Death Star," this undetected object could be a red or brown dwarf star, or an even darker presence several times the mass of Jupiter. An "invisible star" responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs may be circling the Sun and causing comets to bombard the Earth, scientists said.
http://www.space.com/8028-sun-nemesis-pelted-earth-comets-study-suggests...

http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/articles/getting-wise-about-nemesis/

Is our Sun part of a binary star system? An unseen companion star, nicknamed "Nemesis," may be sending comets towards Earth. Throughout history, such impacts could have had a profound effect on the evolution of the biosphere by causing regular mass extinctions. If Nemesis exists, NASA's new WISE telescope should be able to spot it.

The brown dwarf -- up to five times the size of Jupiter -- could be to blame for mass extinctions that occur here every 26 million years.

The star -- nicknamed Nemesis by NASA scientists -- would be invisible as it only emits infrared light and is incredibly distant. Nemesis is believed to orbit our solar system at 25,000 times the distance of the Earth to the Sun. As it spins through the galaxy, its gravitational pull drags icy bodies out of the Oort Cloud -- a vast sphere of rock and dust twice as far away as Nemesis. These "snowballs" are thrown towards Earth as comets, causing devastation similar to the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.
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I just love how these guys come on here and spout this it's a "reflection of darkness". How does darkness reflect? Only light can reflect. I've been making

@jcattera I do see the smaller sphere in front of the dark object, but I put this on my 30 inch cinematic screen and on 2011-02-09 photo at 03:29:36 there is clearly an immense, perfectly round sphere behind the dark object. I'd say it was about 50 times the size of the dark object. Some writings say that Nemesis is the dark star, Homeworld is the earth-like planet that the Annunaki live on (the small sphere orbiting the dark star??), and Nibiru is a gas giant like Jupiter, only larger.

@SilverMessages - Yes, I do see it. It made it even more conclusive that it is real after seeing the sphere in front of it. Thank you for checking it out.

Why would an object that close to the sun, not be illuminated?



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5 comments

  • Evildweeb#

    Evildweeb February 13, 2011 5:47:19 PM CET

    Not sure why the original links failed. I went back and hunted them down, and sure enough they didn't transfer in the edit --- Sooo... I revised this post with the right links. Thanks for the heads up Mattypoo :)

  • Evildweeb#

    Evildweeb February 13, 2011 5:47:03 PM CET

    Not sure why the original links failed. I went back and hunted them down, and sure enough they didn't transfer in the edit --- Sooo... I revised this post with the right links. Thanks for the heads up Mattypoo :)

  • Evildweeb#

    Evildweeb February 13, 2011 5:46:49 PM CET

    Not sure why the original links failed. I went back and hunted them down, and sure enough they didn't transfer in the edit --- Sooo... I revised this post with the right links. Thanks for the heads up Mattypoo :)

  • Mattypoo72#

    Mattypoo72 February 13, 2011 1:58:22 PM CET

    hi there, just to tell you that none of the links in your explanation work. that is funny, hey?

  • Vik456#

    Vik456 February 13, 2011 3:21:47 AM CET

    If have to take into consideration that the "black spot" you see is a type of a lens glare producing a negative image type effect on the filter. You can see that the "black spot" is identically the same to the bright planet near it. I can also be wrong and it could be some type of Planet X also.. lol



 
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