11/11/11

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 18582
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:22 pm
Location: In your grill

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 10:48 am » by Slith


A tribute to the sacrifices made by all

Thank you


Upload to Disclose.tv

Image

Beating the shit out of spammers......one click at a time

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:04 am

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 6:39 pm » by flsts1


An email sent to me....

Letter from an airline pilot:

He writes: My lead flight attendant came to me and said, "We have an H.R. On this flight." (H.R. Stands for human remains.) "Are they military?" I asked.

'Yes', she said.

'Is there an escort?' I asked.

'Yes, I've already assigned him a seat'.

'Would you please tell him to come to the flight deck. You can board him early," I said..

A short while later, a young army sergeant entered the flight deck. He was the image of the perfectly dressed soldier. He introduced himself and I asked him about his soldier. The escorts of these fallen soldiers talk about them as if they are still alive and still with us.

'My soldier is on his way back to Virginia ,' he said. He proceeded to answer my questions, but offered no words.

I asked him if there was anything I could do for him and he said no. I told him that he had the toughest job in the military and that I appreciated the work that he does for the families of our fallen soldiers. The first officer and I got up out of our seats to shake his hand. He left the flight deck to find his seat.

We completed our pre-flight checks, pushed back and performed an uneventful departure. About 30 minutes into our flight I received a call from the lead flight attendant in the cabin. 'I just found out the family of the soldier we are carrying, is on board', she said. She then proceeded to tell me that the father, mother, wife and 2-year old daughter were escorting their son, husband, and father home. The family was upset because they were unable to see the container that the soldier was in before we left. We were on our way to a major hub at which the family was going to wait four hours for the connecting flight home to Virginia .

The father of the soldier told the flight attendant that knowing his son was below him in the cargo compartment and being unable to see him was too much for him and the family to bear. He had asked the flight attendant if there was anything that could be done to allow them to see him upon our arrival. The family wanted to be outside by the cargo door to watch the soldier being taken off the airplane. I could hear the desperation in the flight attendants voice when she asked me if there was anything I could do. 'I'm on it', I said. I told her that I would get back to her.

Airborne communication with my company normally occurs in the form of e-mail like messages. I decided to bypass this system and contact my flight dispatcher directly on a
Secondary radio. There is a radio operator in the operations control center who connects you to the telephone of the dispatcher. I was in direct contact with the dispatcher. I explained the situation I had on board with the family and what it was the family wanted. He said he understood and that he would get back to me.

Two hours went by and I had not heard from the dispatcher. We were going to get busy soon and I needed to know what to tell the family. I sent a text message asking for an update. I
Saved the return message from the dispatcher and the following is the text:

'Captain, sorry it has taken so long to get back to you. There is policy on this now and I had to check on a few things. Upon your arrival a dedicated escort team will meet the aircraft.
The team will escort the family to the ramp and plane side. A van will be used to load the remains with a secondary van for the family. The family will be taken to their departure area and escorted into the terminal where the remains can be seen on the ramp. It is a private area for the family only. When the connecting aircraft arrives, the family will be escorted onto the ramp and plane side to watch the remains being loaded for the final leg home. Captain, most of us here in flight control are veterans.. Please pass our condolences on to the family. Thanks.'

I sent a message back telling flight control thanks for a good job. I printed out the message and gave it to the lead flight attendant to pass on to the father. The lead flight attendant was very thankful and told me, 'You have no idea how much this will mean to them.'

Things started getting busy for the descent, approach and landing. After landing, we cleared the runway and taxied to the ramp area. The ramp is huge with 15 gates on either side of the alleyway. It is always a busy area with aircraft maneuvering every which way to enter and exit. When we entered the ramp and checked in with the ramp controller, we were told
That all traffic was being held for us.

'There is a team in place to meet the aircraft', we were told. It looked like it was all coming together, then I realized that once we turned the seat belt sign off, everyone would stand up at once and delay the family from getting off the airplane. As we approached our gate, I asked the co-pilot to tell the ramp controller we were going to stop short of the gate to
make an announcement to the passengers. He did that and the ramp controller said, 'Take your time.'

I stopped the aircraft and set the parking brake. I pushed the public address button and said, 'Ladies and gentleman, this is your Captain speaking I have stopped short of our gate to make a special announcement. We have a passenger on board who deserves our honor and respect. His Name is Private XXXXXX, a soldier who recently lost his life. Private XXXXXX is under your feet in the cargo hold. Escorting him today is Army Sergeant XXXXXXX. Also, on board are his father, mother, wife, and daughter. Your entire flight crew is asking for all passengers to remain in their seats to allow the family to exit the aircraft first. Thank you.'

We continued the turn to the gate, came to a stop and started our shutdown procedures. A couple of minutes later I opened the cockpit door. I found the two forward flight attendants crying, something you just do not see. I was told that after we came to a stop, every passenger on the aircraft stayed in their seats, waiting for the family to exit the aircraft.

When the family got up and gathered their things, a passenger slowly started to clap his hands. Moments later more passengers joined in and soon the entire aircraft was
clapping. Words of 'God Bless You', I'm sorry, thank you, be proud, and other kind words were uttered to the family as they made their way down the aisle and out of the airplane.

They were escorted down to the ramp to finally be with their loved one.

Many of the passengers disembarking thanked me for the announcement I had made. They were just words, I told them, I could say them over and over again, but nothing I say will bring back that brave soldier.


Image
...
Try not to become a man of success but a man of value.
Albert Einstein

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 18582
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:22 pm
Location: In your grill

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 6:45 pm » by Slith


Awesome post Fists. I mean awesome!!!!!!!

Cheers man. Lest we forget
Image

Beating the shit out of spammers......one click at a time

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4192
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:30 pm

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 7:02 pm » by Aragajag


Image
'Gee, I wish we had one of them Doomsday Machines, Stainsey..' General "Buck" Turgidson

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 17882
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 4:20 am
Location: underneath the circumstances

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 7:39 pm » by The57ironman


flsts1 wrote:An email sent to me....

Letter from an airline pilot:

He writes: My lead flight attendant came to me and said, "We have an H.R. On this flight." (H.R. Stands for human remains.) "Are they military?" I asked.

'Yes', she said.

'Is there an escort?' I asked.

'Yes, I've already assigned him a seat'.

'Would you please tell him to come to the flight deck. You can board him early," I said..

A short while later, a young army sergeant entered the flight deck. He was the image of the perfectly dressed soldier. He introduced himself and I asked him about his soldier. The escorts of these fallen soldiers talk about them as if they are still alive and still with us.

'My soldier is on his way back to Virginia ,' he said. He proceeded to answer my questions, but offered no words.

I asked him if there was anything I could do for him and he said no. I told him that he had the toughest job in the military and that I appreciated the work that he does for the families of our fallen soldiers. The first officer and I got up out of our seats to shake his hand. He left the flight deck to find his seat.

We completed our pre-flight checks, pushed back and performed an uneventful departure. About 30 minutes into our flight I received a call from the lead flight attendant in the cabin. 'I just found out the family of the soldier we are carrying, is on board', she said. She then proceeded to tell me that the father, mother, wife and 2-year old daughter were escorting their son, husband, and father home. The family was upset because they were unable to see the container that the soldier was in before we left. We were on our way to a major hub at which the family was going to wait four hours for the connecting flight home to Virginia .

The father of the soldier told the flight attendant that knowing his son was below him in the cargo compartment and being unable to see him was too much for him and the family to bear. He had asked the flight attendant if there was anything that could be done to allow them to see him upon our arrival. The family wanted to be outside by the cargo door to watch the soldier being taken off the airplane. I could hear the desperation in the flight attendants voice when she asked me if there was anything I could do. 'I'm on it', I said. I told her that I would get back to her.

Airborne communication with my company normally occurs in the form of e-mail like messages. I decided to bypass this system and contact my flight dispatcher directly on a
Secondary radio. There is a radio operator in the operations control center who connects you to the telephone of the dispatcher. I was in direct contact with the dispatcher. I explained the situation I had on board with the family and what it was the family wanted. He said he understood and that he would get back to me.

Two hours went by and I had not heard from the dispatcher. We were going to get busy soon and I needed to know what to tell the family. I sent a text message asking for an update. I
Saved the return message from the dispatcher and the following is the text:

'Captain, sorry it has taken so long to get back to you. There is policy on this now and I had to check on a few things. Upon your arrival a dedicated escort team will meet the aircraft.
The team will escort the family to the ramp and plane side. A van will be used to load the remains with a secondary van for the family. The family will be taken to their departure area and escorted into the terminal where the remains can be seen on the ramp. It is a private area for the family only. When the connecting aircraft arrives, the family will be escorted onto the ramp and plane side to watch the remains being loaded for the final leg home. Captain, most of us here in flight control are veterans.. Please pass our condolences on to the family. Thanks.'

I sent a message back telling flight control thanks for a good job. I printed out the message and gave it to the lead flight attendant to pass on to the father. The lead flight attendant was very thankful and told me, 'You have no idea how much this will mean to them.'

Things started getting busy for the descent, approach and landing. After landing, we cleared the runway and taxied to the ramp area. The ramp is huge with 15 gates on either side of the alleyway. It is always a busy area with aircraft maneuvering every which way to enter and exit. When we entered the ramp and checked in with the ramp controller, we were told
That all traffic was being held for us.

'There is a team in place to meet the aircraft', we were told. It looked like it was all coming together, then I realized that once we turned the seat belt sign off, everyone would stand up at once and delay the family from getting off the airplane. As we approached our gate, I asked the co-pilot to tell the ramp controller we were going to stop short of the gate to
make an announcement to the passengers. He did that and the ramp controller said, 'Take your time.'

I stopped the aircraft and set the parking brake. I pushed the public address button and said, 'Ladies and gentleman, this is your Captain speaking I have stopped short of our gate to make a special announcement. We have a passenger on board who deserves our honor and respect. His Name is Private XXXXXX, a soldier who recently lost his life. Private XXXXXX is under your feet in the cargo hold. Escorting him today is Army Sergeant XXXXXXX. Also, on board are his father, mother, wife, and daughter. Your entire flight crew is asking for all passengers to remain in their seats to allow the family to exit the aircraft first. Thank you.'

We continued the turn to the gate, came to a stop and started our shutdown procedures. A couple of minutes later I opened the cockpit door. I found the two forward flight attendants crying, something you just do not see. I was told that after we came to a stop, every passenger on the aircraft stayed in their seats, waiting for the family to exit the aircraft.

When the family got up and gathered their things, a passenger slowly started to clap his hands. Moments later more passengers joined in and soon the entire aircraft was
clapping. Words of 'God Bless You', I'm sorry, thank you, be proud, and other kind words were uttered to the family as they made their way down the aisle and out of the airplane.

They were escorted down to the ramp to finally be with their loved one.

Many of the passengers disembarking thanked me for the announcement I had made. They were just words, I told them, I could say them over and over again, but nothing I say will bring back that brave soldier.


Image
...

.


.......brought tears to 'my' eyes...





:cheers:

.
.






..... If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.......
.

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 18582
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:22 pm
Location: In your grill

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 7:44 pm » by Slith


Cheers Arag,

I'm hoping more will show respect to the fallen, and those that fought to keep us free.

Show them respect
Image

Beating the shit out of spammers......one click at a time

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 1211
Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2009 6:25 am

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 8:41 pm » by Dagnamski


“If at first, the idea is not absurd, then there is no hope for it”

>>>>>Image

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 13728
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:45 pm
Location: Chicago

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 8:45 pm » by domdabears


I didn't know we had the same Veterans day.
I wanna be a Warhol
Displayed on your wall
Still hung up on you

Conspirator
Posts: 2550
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:23 am
Location: 'Happiness is the angle at which the wise are gathered'

PostSun Nov 11, 2012 11:28 pm » by SamueltheLion


sorry slith but what my spirit thinks about world war 1 and 2 is it was a giant sham, and both sides thought they were fighting for freedom.

what happened in the end?

less freedom.

before the world wars, people could move more freely.
just as people could move more freely before 9/11 "terrorism".

I honor the dead in so far as I mourn their death, but not that for which they fought, which in my eyes, was an illusion, created by the parasitical ruling elite, then again, you know all of this and my opinion already.

Image

the real "war" is within: don't fight or kill other people, they ARE you.
especially not people you don't even know.
defend yourself, sure, but as far as i can tell: both sides in both wars were manipulated to go far beyond self defense, and honor didn't have much meaning in the end, with the loss of respect, it was just slaughter.

do we honor those who died in troy?

Image

no? why not.

because we don't feel "aligned' with the greeks or their "enemies", who weren't their enemies before paris stole away their queen.
Is Nationalism involved in all wars? Undoubtedly so in my opinion. Is nationalism ever good then? If people can be manipulated into wars through it? Only if the populace is intelligent enough to refuse to march to their own death. But what do i know right?

because time reveals the tragedy that war always is, and how killing and the ransacking of cities lay bare the worst of man's traits: savagery; we do not honor savagery, we abhor it.
The only heroic thing about the people who fought was if they were perhaps able to bring the war to an end sooner, once they found themselves involved in it.
Just look at all that was wasted, all of the youth who died for what? nothing.

and you tell me it's not nothing, you tell me it's something, but that's just because you want to believe all these people died fighting for -something-. Freedom. WELL: What if we were intelligent and brave enough to prevent it from happening in the first place!? Wow: Now that would be worth honoring; perhaps an HONORABLE life, like the honor you can see in the eyes of these people:

Image

(even though they are weilding rifles, lol)

defend our freedom? no, our planet has become our prison and it has grown tighter because of all these self-righteous freedom fighters, military men willing to sign their brain away.
the cia, cctv cameras, spying, oh god... how many dreadful things can you count on one hand, which were invented and called into existence because of what happened in the world wars, and how people allowed themselves to be involved in them?

You don't FIGHT for freedom! end of story. Not in the sense of murdering millions of people. And bombing civilians at least.

Or tell me: How FREE is anyone when they are in a state of Fighting, in a state of -engaging the enemy-.

geeze, in this day and age i would have thought you would see that clearly now, with the iraq war and so on. What a SHAM.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Is_a_Racket

Image

"War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. It is the only one international in scope.
It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives.
A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of the people. Only a small 'inside' group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes."


Recommendations

In his penultimate chapter, Butler argues that three steps are necessary to disrupt the war racket:
1. Making war unprofitable. Butler suggests that the owners of capital should be "conscripted" before other citizens are: "It can be smashed effectively only by taking the profit out of war. The only way to smash this racket is to conscript capital and industry and labour before the nation's manhood can be conscripted. … Let the officers and the directors and the high-powered executives of our armament factories and our steel companies and our munitions makers and our ship-builders and our airplane builders and the manufacturers of all other things that provide profit in war time as well as the bankers and the speculators, be conscripted — to get $30 a month, the same wage as the lads in the trenches get"


2. Acts of war to be decided by those who fight it. He also suggests a limited plebiscite to determine if the war is to be fought. Eligible to vote would be those who risk death on the front lines.

3. Limitation of militaries to self-defence. For the United States, Butler recommends that the navy be limited, by law, to within 200 miles of the coastline, and the army restricted to the territorial limits of the country, ensuring that war, if fought, can never be one of aggression.


the soldier pays the biggest part of the bill.


this is my way of "respecting the fallen", and if you don't think it's respectful to state the truth as you see it, then ignore this.

:hugging:
Your faith will make you whole

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:04 am

PostMon Nov 12, 2012 1:07 am » by flsts1


Hey Thanks for you thoughts Sam.
I here what your saying.
But ask any vet who he put his neck on the line for...
Know what he's going to tell you?

"My fire team partner"

He ain't going to tell you gawd, qween and country

Conventional militaries are but a microcosm of society as a whole. Each and everyone of those that hire on have reasons of thier own. Be it financial...did it to escape a jail term...bored...whatever...

You can bet your bottom dollar after any period of time in a theater, troops get disillusioned w/the "noble cause".

This cannot alleviate the sacrifice some have made. For this reason the warrior should be honoured.

Perhaps not for the cause but for the spirit....For without these types of men "others" will and do suffer.

It's a tough thing to explain to those whom have not put their neck (life) on the line for others...they cannot understand.
Try not to become a man of success but a man of value.
Albert Einstein


Next

Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook