640TBs Of Data In One Billionth Of A Second

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PostTue Jun 17, 2014 11:16 pm » by Domeika


Chaindrive wrote:June 16, 2014
Justine Alford


New Type Of Computer Capable Of Calculating 640TBs Of Data In One Billionth Of A Second, Could Revolutionize Computing


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Let me introduce The Machine- HP’s latest invention that could revolutionize the computing world. According to HP, The Machine is not a server, workstation, PC, device or phone but an amalgamation of all these things. It’s designed to be able to cope with the masses of data produced from the Internet of Things, which is the concept of a future network designed to connect a variety of objects and gadgets.

In order to handle this flurry of information it uses clusters of specialized cores as opposed to a small number of generalized cores. The whole thing is connected together using silicon photonics instead of traditional copper wires, boosting the speed of the system whilst reducing energy requirements. Furthermore, the technology features memristors which are resistors that are able to store information even after power loss.

The result is a system six times more powerful than existing servers that requires eighty times less energy. According to HP, The Machine can manage 160 petabytes of data in a mere 250 nanoseconds. And, what’s more, this isn’t just for huge supercomputers- it could be used in smaller devices such as smartphones and laptops. During a keynote speech given at Discover, chief technology officer Martin Fink explained that if the technology was scaled down, smartphones could be fabricated with 100 terabytes of memory.

HP envisages a variety of future applications for this technology in numerous different settings, from business to medicine. For example, it could be possible for doctors to compare your symptoms or DNA with patients across the globe in an instant and without breaching privacy, improving health outcomes.

While this is an exciting development, unfortunately for us HP isn’t expecting to have samples until 2015 and the first devices equipped with The Machine won’t surface until 2018.

If you’d like to find out more, check out this YouTube video from Discover 2014 detailing the technology:



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http://www.iflscience.com/technology/new-type-computer-capable-calculating-640tbs-data-one-billionth-second-could#TiE2LyYbvFlEdvTm.99



Read this the other day... and "I" made me very own machine.... (long pause)... unfortunately.. I made mine out of legos.. Hmmm me wonders if itll work the same way... Hell, it was cheap and easy to make.. :D I also wonder if itll start bouncing around the table top with all the information zipping back and forth like it was having a spazim attack or something.? :lol:


As usual, people will roll out the ole great for education, kids, bzzz. When what it really means is......

A QUANTUM LEAP IN PORNOGRAPHY

Wooooooo Hooooo!
I don't know about leggo porn though....you sick rat bastid :dancing:

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PostWed Jun 18, 2014 12:08 am » by Toxic32


I remember watching a program called tomorrows world on the BBC a very very long time ago where they introduced a new type of memory for computers that could, even at that time record everything that had ever been filmed, recorded, written, photographed, or needed to be stored in some way. He showed what it was. It was a crystal the size of your little finger nail. I remember after all they had claimed the commentator said that it would only take up a fraction of what could be used to store information. What the fuck happened to that invention? Killed by the people that wanted to control the release of memory capacity. That's why every year we are drip fed an increase in memory capacity and ram use.
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PostSun Oct 12, 2014 11:42 am » by Tjahzi


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Epic :o
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PostSun Oct 12, 2014 12:10 pm » by Mad Scientist


Toxic32 wrote:I remember watching a program called tomorrows world on the BBC a very very long time ago where they introduced a new type of memory for computers that could, even at that time record everything that had ever been filmed, recorded, written, photographed, or needed to be stored in some way. He showed what it was. It was a crystal the size of your little finger nail. I remember after all they had claimed the commentator said that it would only take up a fraction of what could be used to store information. What the fuck happened to that invention? Killed by the people that wanted to control the release of memory capacity. That's why every year we are drip fed an increase in memory capacity and ram use.


When the P-75 was released back in the day I was told by an ex-Father in Law that they were already 10 years ahead in developing hardware. They are probably milking stuff to finance R&D departments.
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PostThu Oct 30, 2014 12:27 pm » by All Creation


Wow! That is impressive. And now they have developed fiber-optic cables that could transmit data at similar rates.

World on a string: Breakthrough fiberoptic cable 2,500X faster than fastest internet
Published time: October 28, 2014 17:13

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AFP Photo / Stan Honda

Imagine downloading your favorite flick in 31 thousandths of a second. Such insane internet speeds are now a reality, with researchers rolling out a 255 terabits per second fiberoptic network which could transport the entire Internet on a single cable.

The cable, the joint effort of Dutch and US scientists, is 2,550 times faster than the fastest single-fiber links in commercial operation today.

In real terms, it could transfer a 1 GB movie in 0.03 milliseconds or the entire contents of your 1 terabit hard drive in about 31 milliseconds.

At this speed, a single fiber optic cable could theoretically carry the all the data on the internet at peak times.

But how does it work?

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and the University of Central Florida employed a well-known but still cost-prohibitive technology; multi-mode fiber.

Normal fibre optic cables contain thousands of strands of glass or plastic fibre which are slightly thicker than the thread of a needle. These fibers can, in essence, only carry the light for a single laser.

The multi-mode fiber used by the researchers in contrast, has seven distinct cores in a hexagonal shape which are able to carry just as many distinct signals at one time. What’s more, they are squeezed down into the size of the same kind of fiber optic cables used to support the current transatlantic internet cables.

Image
image from http://www.nature.com

In layman’s terms, it is something akin to a one way road being stretched out into a seven lane highway. This seven lane highway is then stretched into a multi-tier freeway, much like the so-called LA 'Stack'. Except in this case, it’s like a seven lane, multi-story drag race, with all the power from the individual vehicles being directed into a single source.

Researchers said that this new type of optical fibre is like "allowing 21 times more bandwidth than currently available in communication networks," which is 4-8 Terabits per second standard.

Moreover, the researchers have introduced "two additional orthogonal dimensions for data transportation - as if three cars can drive on top of each other in the same lane."

In their test, the researchers managed to reach speeds of 5.1 terabits for each of the seven carriers. Then, by using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a number of optical carrier signals onto a single optical wire, they managed to cram 50 carriers down the seven cores, reaching the massive 255 terabit per second speed.

Measuring less than 200 microns in diameter, the new fiber does not take noticeably more space than conventional fibres already deployed, Dr. Chigo Okonkwo who led the work explained.

“These remarkable results, supported by the European Union Framework 7, MODEGAP, definitely give the possibility to achieve petabits per second transmission, which is the focus of the European Commission in the coming seven-year Horizon 2020 research program,” Okonkwo said.

Research results were recently published in the journal Nature Photonics.

While the technology for multi-mode fiber is in place, the price tag on replacing the millions of miles of existing cables could put the upgrade off for decades.

But with the mind-blistering implications of a world wide web operating at thousands of times its current maximum speed, the cost of holding off on the upgrade for too long may be incalculable.


http://rt.com/news/200151-internet-spee ... tic-cable/

Imagine if those cables were actually put to use.
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PostThu Oct 30, 2014 7:48 pm » by Dagnamski


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“If at first, the idea is not absurd, then there is no hope for it”

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PostThu Oct 30, 2014 10:43 pm » by Chaindrive2.5


All Creation wrote:Wow! That is impressive. And now they have developed fiber-optic cables that could transmit data at similar rates.

World on a string: Breakthrough fiberoptic cable 2,500X faster than fastest internet
Published time: October 28, 2014 17:13

Image
AFP Photo / Stan Honda

Imagine downloading your favorite flick in 31 thousandths of a second. Such insane internet speeds are now a reality, with researchers rolling out a 255 terabits per second fiberoptic network which could transport the entire Internet on a single cable.

The cable, the joint effort of Dutch and US scientists, is 2,550 times faster than the fastest single-fiber links in commercial operation today.

In real terms, it could transfer a 1 GB movie in 0.03 milliseconds or the entire contents of your 1 terabit hard drive in about 31 milliseconds.

At this speed, a single fiber optic cable could theoretically carry the all the data on the internet at peak times.

But how does it work?

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and the University of Central Florida employed a well-known but still cost-prohibitive technology; multi-mode fiber.

Normal fibre optic cables contain thousands of strands of glass or plastic fibre which are slightly thicker than the thread of a needle. These fibers can, in essence, only carry the light for a single laser.

The multi-mode fiber used by the researchers in contrast, has seven distinct cores in a hexagonal shape which are able to carry just as many distinct signals at one time. What’s more, they are squeezed down into the size of the same kind of fiber optic cables used to support the current transatlantic internet cables.

Image
image from http://www.nature.com

In layman’s terms, it is something akin to a one way road being stretched out into a seven lane highway. This seven lane highway is then stretched into a multi-tier freeway, much like the so-called LA 'Stack'. Except in this case, it’s like a seven lane, multi-story drag race, with all the power from the individual vehicles being directed into a single source.

Researchers said that this new type of optical fibre is like "allowing 21 times more bandwidth than currently available in communication networks," which is 4-8 Terabits per second standard.

Moreover, the researchers have introduced "two additional orthogonal dimensions for data transportation - as if three cars can drive on top of each other in the same lane."

In their test, the researchers managed to reach speeds of 5.1 terabits for each of the seven carriers. Then, by using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a number of optical carrier signals onto a single optical wire, they managed to cram 50 carriers down the seven cores, reaching the massive 255 terabit per second speed.

Measuring less than 200 microns in diameter, the new fiber does not take noticeably more space than conventional fibres already deployed, Dr. Chigo Okonkwo who led the work explained.

“These remarkable results, supported by the European Union Framework 7, MODEGAP, definitely give the possibility to achieve petabits per second transmission, which is the focus of the European Commission in the coming seven-year Horizon 2020 research program,” Okonkwo said.

Research results were recently published in the journal Nature Photonics.

While the technology for multi-mode fiber is in place, the price tag on replacing the millions of miles of existing cables could put the upgrade off for decades.

But with the mind-blistering implications of a world wide web operating at thousands of times its current maximum speed, the cost of holding off on the upgrade for too long may be incalculable.


http://rt.com/news/200151-internet-spee ... tic-cable/

Imagine if those cables were actually put to use.




could put the upgrade off for decades.. have NO idea just how many miles of copper is still buried and STILL being used today.. Whoopie you have a DSL or your daddy warbucks and have google fiber... IF you can even get it, thats great in massive cities like new york or los angeles AND within those cities.. BUT once it hits butthole montana, well, guess what... your old 33.6 modem would be faster there.. and your DLS/fiber anything is worthless..

Now, satellite IS the thing to have really... But guess what (dont know about now tho)... your REQUIRED to have a landline IN getting your security keys.. Direct was like that... BIG pain in the ass... and you need a separate dish for it too... dont ask me why video AND data cant be on the same stupid dish..



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