A Devil in Disguise

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PostSat Jan 19, 2013 12:58 pm » by Phaeton


Phaeton wrote:The notion Ashkenazim are to be equated with the Khazar is not clear, what does seem clear, is the following:


- the Khazars and Khazar Kingdom was concealed from the annals of history;

- in the seventh century the Khazar pagan nation adopted Judaism as the new state religion by decree of King or 'Chagan' Bulan;

- they were an Asiatic Mongoloid nation. They are classified by modern anthropologists as Turco- Finns racially;

- the converted Khazars were the first population of so-called or self-styled 'Jews' in Eastern Europe;

- They were a people of whose life and history are interwoven with the very beginnings of the history of the Jews of Russia http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/4279-chazars;

- the Khazars gravitated strongly towards the Talmud instead of the Thora;

- since the conquest of the Khazars by the Russians and the disappearance of the Khazar Kingdom the language of the Khazars is known as Yiddish;

- for about six centuries the self- styled "Jews" of eastern Europe have referred to themselves while still resident in their native eastern European countries as "Yiddish" by nationality;

- Jews throughout the world today of eastern European origin make up at least 90% of the world's total present population of so-called or self-styled "Jews";

- by the close of the 19th century there was massive Ashkenazi emigration from Eastern Europe to Australia, South Africa, the United States, and last but certainly not least, Erez Israel;

- before World War II Ashkenazi Jewry comprised 90% of the global total.



Findings of a recent gene study:

Gene study settles debate over origin of European Jews

(AFP) – 2 days ago

PARIS — Jews of European origin are a mix of ancestries, with many hailing from tribes in the Caucasus who converted to Judaism and created an empire that lasted half a millennium, according to a gene study.

The investigation, its author says, should settle a debate that has been roiling for more than two centuries.

Jews of European descent, often called Ashkenazis, account for some 90 percent of the more than 13 million Jews in the world today.

According to the so-called Rhineland Hypothesis, Ashkenazis descended from Jews who progressively fled Palestine after the Moslem conquest of 638 AD.

They settled in southern Europe and then, in the late Middle Ages, about 50,000 of them moved from the Rhineland in Germany into eastern Europe, according to the hypothesis.

But detractors say this idea is implausible.

Barring a miracle --which some supporters of the Rhineland Hypothesis have in fact suggested -- the scenario would have been demographically impossible.

It would mean that the population of Eastern European Jews leapt from 50,000 in the 15th century to around eight million at the start of the 20th century.

That birth rate would have been 10 times greater than that of the local non-Jewish population. And it would have occurred despite economic hardship, disease, wars and pogroms that ravaged Jewish communities.

Seeking new light in the argument, a study published in the British journal Genome Biology and Evolution, compares the genomes of 1,287 unrelated individuals who hail from eight Jewish and 74 non-Jewish populations.

Geneticist Eran Elhaik of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, trawled through this small mountain of data in search of single changes in the DNA code that are linked to a group's geographical origins.

Such telltales have been used in past research to delve into the origins of the Basque people and the pygmy people of central Africa.

Among European Jews, Elhaik found ancestral signatures that pointed clearly to the Caucasus and also, but to a smaller degree, the Middle East.

The results, said Elhaik, give sound backing for the rival theory -- the "Khazarian Hypothesis."

Under this concept, eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, a hotchpotch of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries AD and, influenced by Jews from Palestine, converted to Judaism in the 8th century.

The Judeo-Khazars built a flourishing empire, drawing in Jews from Mesopotamia and imperial Byzantium.

They became so successful that they sent offshoots into Hungary and Romania, planting the seeds of a great diaspora.

But Khazaria collapsed in the 13th century when it was attacked by the Mongols and became weakened by outbreaks of the Black Death.

The Judeo-Khazars fled westwards, settling in the rising Polish Kingdom and in Hungary, where their skills in finance, economics and politics were in demand, and eventually spread to central and western Europe, according to the "Khazarian Hypothesis."

"We conclude that the genome of European Jews is a tapestry of ancient populations including Judaised Khazars, Greco-Roman Jews, Mesopotamian Jews and Judeans," says Elhaik.

"Their population structure was formed in the Caucasus and the banks of the Volga, with roots stretching to Canaan and the banks of the Jordan."

Many things are unknown about the Khazars, whose tribal confederation gathered Slavs, Scythians, Hunnic-Bulgars, Iranians, Alans and Turks.

But, argues Elhaik, the tale sketched in the genes is backed by archaeological findings, by Jewish literature that describes the Khazars' conversion to Judaism, and by language, too.

"Yiddish, the language of Central and Eastern European Jews, began as a Slavic language" before being reclassified as High German, he notes.

Another pointer is that European Jews and their ancestral groups in the Caucasus and Middle East share a relatively high risk of diseases such as cystic fibrosis.

The investigation should help fine-tune a fast-expanding branch of genomics, which looks at single-change DNA mutations that are linked with inherited disease, adds Elhaik.




The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses

Eran Elhaik1,2,*

+ Author Affiliations

1Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
2McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

↵*Corresponding author: E-mail: eelhaik@jhsph.edu.

Accepted December 5, 2012.

Abstract

The question of Jewish ancestry has been the subject of controversy for over two centuries and has yet to be resolved. The “Rhineland hypothesis” depicts Eastern European Jews as a “population isolate” that emerged from a small group of German Jews who migrated eastward and expanded rapidly. Alternatively, the “Khazarian hypothesis” suggests that Eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, an amalgam of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries CE and converted to Judaism in the 8th century.

Mesopotamian and Greco–Roman Jews continuously reinforced the Judaized empire until the 13th century. Following the collapse of their empire, the Judeo–Khazars fled to Eastern Europe. The rise of European Jewry is therefore explained by the contribution of the Judeo–Khazars. Thus far, however, the Khazars’ contribution has been estimated only empirically, as the absence of genome-wide data from Caucasus populations precluded testing the Khazarian hypothesis.

Recent sequencing of modern Caucasus populations prompted us to revisit the Khazarian hypothesis and compare it with the Rhineland hypothesis. We applied a wide range of population genetic analyses to compare these two hypotheses. Our findings support the Khazarian hypothesis and portray the European Jewish genome as a mosaic of Near Eastern-Caucasus, European, and Semitic ancestries, thereby consolidating previous contradictory reports of Jewish ancestry.

We further describe a major difference among Caucasus populations explained by the early presence of Judeans in the Southern and Central Caucasus. Our results have important implications for the demographic forces that shaped the genetic diversity in the Caucasus and for medical studies.

http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/5/1/61

http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1208/1208.1092.pdf
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PostSat Jan 19, 2013 1:36 pm » by mediasorcery


hmmmmm, always thought as much^,
the story of life is quicker than the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello and goodbye, until we meet again my friend.

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PostSat Jan 19, 2013 3:25 pm » by Phaeton


Although I completely agree with what you said - as it goes for me as well - I am not presenting this as absolute proof M.

Just like the studies done in the past confirming the Rhineland hypothesis do not equate absolute proof.

One just has to study the respective reports, analyse its sources and possible connections to those sources, and ask yourself 'who do I trust'? Who has the most to gain by presenting a lie as the truth.

A central question in this context, if you are one that believes scripture holds [a certain degree of] truth,
what congregation is referred to when the following is read:

"Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee."

Who?

I would pose the following symbols are a logical guess.

Image

Image

Image
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


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