bees with sensors

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PostThu Jan 16, 2014 10:47 am » by RATRODROB


Australia has largely escaped the mysterious decline in the disappearing bee colonies, probably due to our isolation, but scientists hav come up with an idea to try and identify the problem of the disappearing bees.

if the tests reveal links to pesticides and other chemicals then just maybe it will make it harder for the likes of MONSANTO to keep poisoning our planet....................read below







Aussie Scientists Strap Tiny Sensors To Bees To Study Colony Decline


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Photo: Researchers put the bees to sleep before gluing the sensors to them.



Scientists in Tasmania are fitting thousands of honey bees with tiny sensors as part of a project aimed at understanding the insect's behaviour and population decline.

CSIRO is working with the University of Tasmania, beekeepers and fruit growers to trial the monitoring technology, in an attempt to improve honey bee pollination and productivity.

They are fitting tiny sensors to the insects, a process which sometimes involves shaving them first.

"This has been done before," CSIRO science leader Paulo de Souza said.

"The difference here is about the size of the sensor. And the difference is the number; we're talking about 5,000 bees."

The sensors measure 2.5 millimetres by 2.5mm and act like a vehicle's "e-TAG", recording when the bees pass particular checkpoints.


Researchers can use the signals from the sensors to find out how the bees move through the landscape and understand changes in their behaviour.

They are also looking at the impacts of pesticides on the honey bees and the drivers of a condition decimating bee populations globally.

"If it impacts the bees, it impacts the whole industry that is producing food," Dr de Souza said.

"This should help us understand optimal productivity conditions, as well as further our knowledge of the cause of colony collapse disorder


Bees put to sleep, shaved, fitted with sensor

The process of gluing on the tiny sensors to the bees is delicate but quick.

"We take the bee into a cold place, usually to a fridge about five degrees Celsius, for five minutes and that is enough to have the bees sleeping," Dr de Souza said.

Video: Dr Paulo de Souza says the sensors do no harm (Supplied: CSIRO) (ABC News)



"We take them out again and attach it while they're sleeping. In five minutes they wake up again and they're ready to fly."

But some need to be shaved first.

"Very young bees, they're very hairy. At times we need to do something to help us," Dr de Souza said.

Researchers say the insects are not harmed by the glue or the sensors.

"It doesn't disturb the way the bee will see or the way the bee will fly, they just work normally," Dr de Souza said.

"Each sensor weight is about five milligrams. This is about 20 per cent of what the bee can carry.

"So the bee can carry a lot of weight in pollen, in nectar, so this is like someone carrying a small backpack."

Next step: shrink sensors to fit fruit flies, mosquitoes

Researchers are releasing about 20 honey bees a day from hives in southern Tasmania.

The bees travel up to 700 metres from the hives, but always return, making it easy to pinpoint changes in their behaviour.

Researchers hope their work will help farmers and fruit growers, who rely on the bees' pollination, to improve their practices.

The next stage of the project is to shrink the sensors to only one millimetre, so they can be attached to much smaller insects such as fruit flies and mosquitoes.








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PostThu Jan 16, 2014 12:10 pm » by DarkHeart


Whats the source for this RRR ?

Even bees get monitored now, jeez


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PostThu Jan 16, 2014 12:40 pm » by Flipper


There you go here is one source. Research is being conducted by the CSIRO Tasmania.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-15/s ... ne/5199862
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PostThu Jan 16, 2014 2:01 pm » by RATRODROB


Flipper wrote:There you go here is one source. Research is being conducted by the CSIRO Tasmania.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-15/s ... ne/5199862






thanx FLIPP, I did fail to show my source................................... :oops:

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PostThu Jan 16, 2014 10:37 pm » by DarkHeart


Cheers guys :cheers:
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PostFri Jan 17, 2014 3:19 am » by Thebluecanary


That's so cool! Who knew you could shave a bee?!

I took a beekeeping class this fall, and our instructor said that "they" think that CCD is a combination of factors; neonicotinoid pesticides that get on the bees and carried back to the hive, which weakens the hive making it prone to the two main bee killers here in the US; varroa mite and American Foulbrood disease. The bees "disappear" because they have attempted to swarm to find a more suitable hive, but because they're weakened by illness they don't survive long. That's just the current local theory, of course. I've wondered about cell phone towers myself.

I'd love to see the final research as to where the sensor-wearing bees go and what they do. That's awesome. And hopefully will help save the bees (and us).
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