BIG CATS ..............Australia

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PostSun Feb 02, 2014 3:00 pm » by Perronick


Didn't Australia sustain dingos and other mid-sized carnivores? I¡m not even sure the foot claw is of much use when some African herbivores are much better equipped and are common prey for big cats.

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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 5:14 am » by RATRODROB


RATRODROB wrote:
Eltorito wrote:We used to live on a farm in the North Eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia.

Rumours about big cats have been going round for decades there.

Apparently some pumas escaped from a circus in the mid 1950’s near Merredin WA.

Hard to tell but the environment would certainly sustain any Big Cat.

We had some 15.000 head of sheep roaming the place;

if we have lost a few each month I doubt we would have noticed to be honest.

I never had problems with the wild live on the farm.

We never got closer than about 30 yards to a big red kangaroo and they would leg it.

We had an emu land on our bonnet once, but the old Holden Kingswood kept us safe. :banana:









Eltorito, the pumas that escaped were possibly from a traveling circus and escaped along with other animals after a truck accident, I might see if I can find something on that.
It would be hard to notice the odd sheep missing from a flock of thousands but often the predator leaves behind a carcass.
Yeah you are not likely too get too close to a big red before they are off, but they sure could do some serious damage to you if cornered or if grumpy, they are certainly not like the little greys you see in caravan parks being fed and patted by kiddies haha.
you are correct when you say our environment could sustain any big cat, theres plenty of cover, water and food.


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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 5:51 am » by RATRODROB


.photo of a suspected big cat at Lara, about 15 mile from where I live in Geelong




Image
Big cat photographed near Lara. Source: Supplied


Image
An old clipping from The Argus of the St Arnaud's puma which was hunted by a posse of locals after it escaped from Perry Brothers circus. Source: Supplied


Image
This large black cat was photographed near Casterton forest several years ago. Picture: Bob Mcpherson Source: News Limited


Image
Rob Curtin with a casting of a big cat paw print which he sighted in the Wombat State Forest in Trentham. Picture: Nicole Garmston Source: Herald Sun



All pics and text HERALD SUN


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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 1:04 pm » by Perronick


Kind of looks like a wildcat, but like bigger.

The wildcat (Felis silvestris) is a small cat found throughout most of Africa, Europe, and southwest and central Asia into India, China, and Mongolia. Because of its wide range it is classed by the IUCN as Least Concern. However, crossbreeding with housecats is extensive and has occurred throughout almost the entirety of the species' range.

The wildcat shows a high degree of geographic variation. Asiatic subspecies have spotted, isabelline coats, African subspecies have sandy-grey fur with banded legs and red-backed ears, and European wildcats resemble heavily built striped tabbies with bushy tails, white chins and throats. All subspecies are generally larger than house cats, with longer legs and more robust bodies. The actual number of subspecies is still debated, with some organisations recognising 22, while others recognise only four, including the Chinese mountain cat, which was previously considered a species in its own right.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildcat

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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 1:37 pm » by Perronick


Or an Asian Golden Cat:

The Asian golden cat is heavily built, with a typical cat-like appearance. It has a head-body length of 66 to 105 cm (26 to 41 in), with a tail 40 to 57 cm (16 to 22 in) long, and is 56 cm (22 in) at the shoulder. The weight ranges from 9 to 16 kg (20 to 35 lb), which is about two or three times the size of a domesticated cat.[2]

The pelage is uniform in color, but highly variable ranging from red to golden brown, dark brown to pale cinnamon, gray to black.


Asian golden cats can climb trees when necessary. They hunt birds, large rodents and reptiles, small ungulates such as muntjacs and young sambar deer.[5] They are capable of bringing down prey much larger than themselves, such as domestic water buffalo calves.[21] In the mountains of Sikkim, they reportedly prey on ghoral.[22]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_golden_cat

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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 2:21 pm » by RATRODROB


Perronick wrote:Or an Asian Golden Cat:

The Asian golden cat is heavily built, with a typical cat-like appearance. It has a head-body length of 66 to 105 cm (26 to 41 in), with a tail 40 to 57 cm (16 to 22 in) long, and is 56 cm (22 in) at the shoulder. The weight ranges from 9 to 16 kg (20 to 35 lb), which is about two or three times the size of a domesticated cat.[2]

The pelage is uniform in color, but highly variable ranging from red to golden brown, dark brown to pale cinnamon, gray to black.


Asian golden cats can climb trees when necessary. They hunt birds, large rodents and reptiles, small ungulates such as muntjacs and young sambar deer.[5] They are capable of bringing down prey much larger than themselves, such as domestic water buffalo calves.[21] In the mountains of Sikkim, they reportedly prey on ghoral.[22]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_golden_cat








Your input is valued Perronick, it really is baffling as to what these big cats all over Australia in fact are and how they got here, maybe they have been here longer than we think.
I don't know what my sister and myself witnessed that day, but it was BIG


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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 4:02 pm » by The57ironman


RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

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...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 6:23 pm » by Thebluecanary


The pic at the top looks like a cougar. The body shape, the way the ears are slightly rounded, and the tail…it looks a lot like a North American cougar or mountain lion (same animal, like 10 different names). The one in the middle could be a thalacyne? (I realize I spelled it wrong, and I'm OK with that.) The bottom one looks like a bushy black dog to me. Too stocky in the body and the tail is wrong.
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PostMon Feb 03, 2014 9:09 pm » by DarkHeart


RATRODROB wrote:.


http://www.australianbigcats.com/2012/11/western-australia-big-cats.html



Myself over the 8 years I was the local Wildlife Officer for Nannup logged a few more than the 64 reports for Thylacines.



Whats the likely hood of the big cats wiping out the remaining Thylacines (aka Tasmanian Tigers) ?

I know they aren't supposed to exist esp on the mainland but there is enough evidence to say they do.


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PostTue Feb 04, 2014 11:54 pm » by RATRODROB


DarkHeart wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:.


http://www.australianbigcats.com/2012/11/western-australia-big-cats.html



Myself over the 8 years I was the local Wildlife Officer for Nannup logged a few more than the 64 reports for Thylacines.



Whats the likely hood of the big cats wiping out the remaining Thylacines (aka Tasmanian Tigers) ?

I know they aren't supposed to exist esp on the mainland but there is enough evidence to say they do.


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I wouldn't be surprised if a number of thylacines survived somewhere, could even be on the main land, who really knows.......?
My thinkin on weather big cats have or could wipe out the last of the thylacines is no, I don't recon big cats are to blame for the demise of thylacines, I just think that big cats can easily find much more passive and slower targets to pursue in the way of food. there is plenty of sheep and other farm animals to take down and the odd smaller kangaroo.
I suppose if food were a little scarce the big cats would certainly have a go, especially if there were thylacine cubs around, but my way of thinkin is that the big cats would have very little to do with it.



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