BIG CATS ..............Australia

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PostWed Feb 05, 2014 12:31 am » by RATRODROB


The57ironman wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

RRR

.


...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
http://i.imgur.com/wYu3g8a.gif






Most peeps (non Australian especially) think of kangaroos as being of the eastern grey type, the small cuddly ones, they are common around caravan parks, golf courses and other public places, these guys can be hand fed and even patted but I don't recommend it, they can still lash out unexpectedly, mostly using their front paws causing lacerations and scratches,
Image
these little guys can still do this
Image
A 13-year-old girl suffered a vicious 25-minute attack by two kangaroos while out jogging in the bush in Australia.
Jade Bassett was left bleeding with deep scratches down her legs as well as injuries to her face and arm after confronting the two eastern grey kangaroos in bushland in Oakhampton in the Hunter region of New South Wales.
Her grandfather, Kevin Henderson, had taken her to the track and sat down on a bench to wait for her to return from a 15-minute run.
Bassett had only jogged about 10 metres when she spotted kangaroos, two of which she said were “really big” and one slightly smaller, though still bigger than her.
As she ran towards them they did not move, which Bassett said she found strange, but did not give it much thought as she ran around them.
As she ran past one bounded up beside her and she moved to let it reach the scrub.
“I thought it was weird but I kept running. You usually don’t see them beside you, they usually move away,” she said.
“I kept going and then I heard a really loud, grunting, hissing, sound. It scared the absolute nutter out of me.”
Bassett saw the kangaroo get up on its hind legs and thought to herself “I can’t outrun a kangaroo”, so she ran into the dense scrub next to the path, thinking it would not follow her.
“Then it hit me, I don’t know if it was with its arms, its legs or its tail. I was just on the ground,” she said. “I looked up and thought ‘oh my god, it’s just so big’.”
Bassett said the kangaroo then attacked her with its front paws, scratching her and trying to bite her while baring its teeth and snarling.
“I’ve never heard a noise like it,” she said. “I can’t sleep, every time I close my eyes I hear it in my mind. I hate it.”
Bassett said she tried to push the kangaroo’s face away from her but the movement exposed her face and stomach to the animal as it attacked her, so she lay down and tried to kick as high as she could.
Bassett did not want to scream for her grandfather as she was worried what would happen if it attacked the 71-year-old.
“I copped a lot in the back of thighs, its claws kept sinking into me but I couldn’t feel it at the time,” she said.
“It took me a full day to get up the guts and look at my legs because they felt so wrong. I could put my finger in the grooves where its claws dug into me.”
Bassett picked up a branch and tried to crawl away from the kangaroo back to the track but it followed her and kept pulling her hair, scratching her and kicking her. Bassett then felt something thump her on the back.
She said she looked up and saw a second kangaroo had joined the attack and its face was just inches from her own.
“It was the scariest thing I have ever seen,” she said. “I thought, ‘it’s going to eat my face’.”
“By now I was just screaming I was in so much pain. One was grabbing the back of my hair and pulling me back while the other was pulling me forward. I thought ‘I can’t handle this’ and just started screaming for my pop.”
Bassett said she kept blacking out as the kangaroos continued kicking, clawing and hitting her. Her grandfather ran yelling down the road with a big stick, which scared the kangaroos away.
Bassett got up and ran back down to the track where Henderson was and they were helped by two strangers.
Henderson said he wanted signs put up in the area.
Bassett said she wanted to warn other people that kangaroos might be more aggressive than usual in the area as she did not want it to happen to anyone else. …

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/19/australia-wildlife









But its the REDS who can really do damage, they are big
Image
this is how they use their tails for balance and stance, they could easily empty your stomach using their extremely powerful hind legs.

Image
Image
they are powerful animals, very muscular and you don't want to piss one off.

people don't realise that roos find it VERY difficult to move backwards, this is why I think a lot of unprovoked attacks occur IMO, they easily feel trapped or cornered, but some are just grumpy, they are mostly wild animals and peeps should not forget that.



RRR
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PostWed Feb 05, 2014 12:42 am » by RATRODROB


Perronick wrote:Didn't Australia sustain dingos and other mid-sized carnivores? I¡m not even sure the foot claw is of much use when some African herbivores are much better equipped and are common prey for big cats.








Australia has a healthy population of dingoes, im not sure what your question is if any, but I have never seen a carcass of a dingo that has been attacked by a predator, their are just too many easier targets for BIG CATS to go after.

big cats over here as opposed to Africa, probably have better access to farm animals all over Australia, sheep and cattle are every where, yes there are many photos of cattle with huge scratch marks on there hides as a result of being attacked by large predators, BIG CATS are the only animals capable of leaving those types of injuries IMO

RRR
The more people i meet, the more i like my dog

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PostWed Feb 05, 2014 1:14 am » by RATRODROB


.

footage of a big cat or large feral...........?


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38 secs in, look at the length of the tail on this one

RRR
The more people i meet, the more i like my dog

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PostWed Feb 05, 2014 1:28 am » by RATRODROB


.



A short doco on BIG CATS Australia, the narrator and the over dramatic music are fckn annoying.



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PostSun Mar 09, 2014 4:42 am » by Opalserpent


RATRODROB wrote:
The57ironman wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

RRR

.


...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
http://i.imgur.com/wYu3g8a.gif





Most peeps (non Australian especially) think of kangaroos as being of the eastern grey type, the small cuddly ones, they are common around caravan parks, golf courses and other public places, these guys can be hand fed and even patted but I don't recommend it, they can still lash out unexpectedly, mostly using their front paws causing lacerations and scratches,
Image
these little guys can still do this
Image
A 13-year-old girl suffered a vicious 25-minute attack by two kangaroos while out jogging in the bush in Australia.
Jade Bassett was left bleeding with deep scratches down her legs as well as injuries to her face and arm after confronting the two eastern grey kangaroos in bushland in Oakhampton in the Hunter region of New South Wales.
Her grandfather, Kevin Henderson, had taken her to the track and sat down on a bench to wait for her to return from a 15-minute run.
Bassett had only jogged about 10 metres when she spotted kangaroos, two of which she said were “really big” and one slightly smaller, though still bigger than her.
As she ran towards them they did not move, which Bassett said she found strange, but did not give it much thought as she ran around them.
As she ran past one bounded up beside her and she moved to let it reach the scrub.
“I thought it was weird but I kept running. You usually don’t see them beside you, they usually move away,” she said.
“I kept going and then I heard a really loud, grunting, hissing, sound. It scared the absolute nutter out of me.”
Bassett saw the kangaroo get up on its hind legs and thought to herself “I can’t outrun a kangaroo”, so she ran into the dense scrub next to the path, thinking it would not follow her.
“Then it hit me, I don’t know if it was with its arms, its legs or its tail. I was just on the ground,” she said. “I looked up and thought ‘oh my god, it’s just so big’.”
Bassett said the kangaroo then attacked her with its front paws, scratching her and trying to bite her while baring its teeth and snarling.
“I’ve never heard a noise like it,” she said. “I can’t sleep, every time I close my eyes I hear it in my mind. I hate it.”
Bassett said she tried to push the kangaroo’s face away from her but the movement exposed her face and stomach to the animal as it attacked her, so she lay down and tried to kick as high as she could.
Bassett did not want to scream for her grandfather as she was worried what would happen if it attacked the 71-year-old.
“I copped a lot in the back of thighs, its claws kept sinking into me but I couldn’t feel it at the time,” she said.
“It took me a full day to get up the guts and look at my legs because they felt so wrong. I could put my finger in the grooves where its claws dug into me.”
Bassett picked up a branch and tried to crawl away from the kangaroo back to the track but it followed her and kept pulling her hair, scratching her and kicking her. Bassett then felt something thump her on the back.
She said she looked up and saw a second kangaroo had joined the attack and its face was just inches from her own.
“It was the scariest thing I have ever seen,” she said. “I thought, ‘it’s going to eat my face’.”
“By now I was just screaming I was in so much pain. One was grabbing the back of my hair and pulling me back while the other was pulling me forward. I thought ‘I can’t handle this’ and just started screaming for my pop.”
Bassett said she kept blacking out as the kangaroos continued kicking, clawing and hitting her. Her grandfather ran yelling down the road with a big stick, which scared the kangaroos away.
Bassett got up and ran back down to the track where Henderson was and they were helped by two strangers.
Henderson said he wanted signs put up in the area.
Bassett said she wanted to warn other people that kangaroos might be more aggressive than usual in the area as she did not want it to happen to anyone else. …

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/19/australia-wildlife









But its the REDS who can really do damage, they are big
Image
this is how they use their tails for balance and stance, they could easily empty your stomach using their extremely powerful hind legs.

Image
Image
they are powerful animals, very muscular and you don't want to piss one off.

people don't realise that roos find it VERY difficult to move backwards, this is why I think a lot of unprovoked attacks occur IMO, they easily feel trapped or cornered, but some are just grumpy, they are mostly wild animals and peeps should not forget that.



RRR







Skippy tasted blood, better watch your babies!!!


Sam Murray


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