Bitcoin the NWO currency

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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 12:32 pm » by mediasorcery


TheDuck wrote:
mediasorcery wrote:i think your spot on, there not really anonomyous at all, they go thru tor or onion or watever which is policed by abcs to the max, they know exactly whose got what, and where can you exchange them for real money???> and who invented them, where is the dude, show me the dude please?? good post.


Bitcoin isn't anonymous at all, you can see every transaction in real time, doesn't have anything to do with tor really, tumblers can hide activitys somewhat...

No one knows who invented them.

There is still no proof that abc agency's have cracked tor at all. People keep saying that, show me evidence please.



how did they bust that silk road dude i wonder? there may not be direct evidence those kinda networks are compromised[cant remember the names] but at an educated guess the abc,s have it mostly all covered, i mean they got thru the email encryption algorythyms and many others so id just as likely assume they have.

im not "against" bitcoin personally, just dont see its worth as a currency, its way too reliant on technology which is prone to failure and hacking as weve already seen, even credit card data like the recent hack of target 110million accounts compromised , just not really real money is it? nor is it safe, at least with cash you got the goods and the power in your hands, where it should be, gold silver even better prolly.
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 12:39 pm » by Opalserpent


Max is almost going troppo in this episode. Full of bitcoin goodness and some fbi and nsa complicity. :clapper:
He needs to smoke some goodness and relax. :flop:

RT


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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 12:47 pm » by Opalserpent


mediasorcery wrote:
TheDuck wrote:
mediasorcery wrote:i think your spot on, there not really anonomyous at all, they go thru tor or onion or watever which is policed by abcs to the max, they know exactly whose got what, and where can you exchange them for real money???> and who invented them, where is the dude, show me the dude please?? good post.


Bitcoin isn't anonymous at all, you can see every transaction in real time, doesn't have anything to do with tor really, tumblers can hide activitys somewhat...

No one knows who invented them.

There is still no proof that abc agency's have cracked tor at all. People keep saying that, show me evidence please.



how did they bust that silk road dude i wonder? there may not be direct evidence those kinda networks are compromised[cant remember the names] but at an educated guess the abc,s have it mostly all covered, i mean they got thru the email encryption algorythyms and many others so id just as likely assume they have.

im not "against" bitcoin personally, just dont see its worth as a currency, its way too reliant on technology which is prone to failure and hacking as weve already seen, even credit card data like the recent hack of target 110million accounts compromised , just not really real money is it? nor is it safe, at least with cash you got the goods and the power in your hands, where it should be, gold silver even better prolly.



Yeah I read the silk road got hacked and many people lost their bitcoin.

I reckon you could be a government agency, hack the silk road and steal

all the customers bitcoin and claim plausible deniability.


It's been compromised and looks like it's only barely on it's feet again.

I won't be posting a link on it. I can imagine mega fascists will be watching

carefully. :look:
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 3:41 pm » by Aragajag


I bet you all one new 25k boat and a new ford ranger(after market tricked up) and a hundred grand in the bank and you can pay me the balance that i have in bitcoin if I am right, if you can show me it doesnt work or is not real.




not a real contract as I dont know how to write one for a bet this big, just saying bitcoin is real wish it was for you
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 6:22 pm » by TheDuck


mediasorcery wrote:
TheDuck wrote:
mediasorcery wrote:i think your spot on, there not really anonomyous at all, they go thru tor or onion or watever which is policed by abcs to the max, they know exactly whose got what, and where can you exchange them for real money???> and who invented them, where is the dude, show me the dude please?? good post.


Bitcoin isn't anonymous at all, you can see every transaction in real time, doesn't have anything to do with tor really, tumblers can hide activitys somewhat...

No one knows who invented them.

There is still no proof that abc agency's have cracked tor at all. People keep saying that, show me evidence please.



how did they bust that silk road dude i wonder? there may not be direct evidence those kinda networks are compromised[cant remember the names] but at an educated guess the abc,s have it mostly all covered, i mean they got thru the email encryption algorythyms and many others so id just as likely assume they have.

im not "against" bitcoin personally, just dont see its worth as a currency, its way too reliant on technology which is prone to failure and hacking as weve already seen, even credit card data like the recent hack of target 110million accounts compromised , just not really real money is it? nor is it safe, at least with cash you got the goods and the power in your hands, where it should be, gold silver even better prolly.


Money isn't real either, just an illusion, backed by fk all these days, so what's the difference, apart from bitcoin having no central authority (which is whats awesome about it...) its safer than money at times if you're smart, can't hack me and steal my bitcoins if I keep my wallet offline, in my pocket... keeping shed loads online is kinda stupid...

I try not to make assumptions, they got the guys name from him discussing programming or something with people on the clearweb (regular internet) they got his rough place of residence because he logged into the silk road management from a friends computer, then they put the pieces together, tor wasn't compromised AT ALL...

As for the new silk road, I wouldn't trust it yet, obviously not run by the same guy, someone just cloned the site... again if you get hacked and lose a shit load of coin on those sites its your own fault, putting all your eggs in one basket is never clever...
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 6:53 pm » by *WillEase*


Why the Massive Popularity of Bitcoin?
December 10, 2013 • From theTrumpet.com
Could distrust in the dollar have anything to do with it?
By Richard Palmer

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Bitcoin, in case you haven’t heard, is the New Big Thing. It’s been advancing throughout the news media this past year, only to explode into the headlines in the last few weeks of November.

Bitcoin is either the currency of the future or the next big bubble, depending on who you talk to (and usually, how old they are). It is a virtual currency, beyond the control of central banks—or any banks—but can be used to buy real things.

And it’s not just used for online trading. Traditional brick-and-mortar shops are starting to accept them. Tesla will sell you a car with bitcoin. The University of Nicosia in Cyprus will sell you an education. The first bitcoin atms are even under construction.

Six months ago, a list of businesses accepting bitcoin contained only 200 entries. Now it’s close to a thousand.

To the converted, bitcoin is doing for currency what the Internet did for information. Transactions are instant. Fees are minimal. Borders are nonexistent. It’s hard—but not impossible—to trace the transactions. You don’t need a credit card, or even a bank account. It is, insist some, the money of tomorrow.

But the skeptics also make a pretty compelling case.

At the start of this year, one bitcoin was worth $13.56. A month later, it was $21.30. By the start of March it had hit $33.51. In early April it peaked at nearly $240, before plummeting down to $83. Currently it trades at $880. That’s up from about $725 on Sunday, and down from it’s all-time peak of $1,200 on November 30.

So how much is a bitcoin really worth? $14? $1,000? Nothing?

That’s the million-bitcoin question. Of itself, a bitcoin has no value. It’s not backed by anything. Neither is the dollar, but at least it has the government to lend it legitimacy.

A bitcoin is worth whatever other people are willing to swap for a bitcoin—hence its extreme volatility.

And what is a bitcoin? How does it work? The explanation is sufficiently complicated to bore most of our readers. Its workings revolve around solving one simple question. If you create a digital currency—where each coin is basically a set of numbers—how do you stop someone spending the same coin twice? If I hand over a coin in exchange for a potato, for example, I’m giving something up. If all I have to do is say a number, I could turn around and give someone the same number in exchange for something else.

Bitcoin’s answer is to broadcast every transaction to the world—but in such a way that it’s very hard to tell who the buyer or seller are. And the system ensures that the records of which bitcoins went where is very hard to forge. That way, all bitcoin users can view the records and verify that no individual spends the same coin twice.

But do most bitcoin users even know that much about the currency they’re using? Probably not—especially not all the new users that have jumped on after the hype in the media.

Who invented bitcoin? No one knows. The original paper outlining how it works was published under what is believed to be pseudonym.

So the next big thing is a currency that most of its users don’t understand, created by someone whose identity is unknown, has no intrinsic value and a price that rockets up and down from day to day. This is the next big currency? Even with the advantages mentioned earlier, why would anyone even use it?

One answer: to break the law. Bitcoin is the currency of choice for buying drugs, hit men or anything else online. But that answer doesn’t hold water anymore. The U.S. government shut down the Internet’s biggest illegal online marketplace in October—seizing 0.22 percent of all bitcoin in circulation in the process. Since then the online illegal drugs market has been in turmoil. Yet at the time of the government’s raid, one bitcoin was worth about $140. It took a slight hit as a result of the raid, before soaring in value. Bitcoin may be used to break the law, but there’s no evidence that that is its main purpose—or even a significant one.

Again, then, why use bitcoin?

One major factor has to be the desire to get rich quickly. People hear stories about guys who bought a handful of bitcoin shortly after they came out in 2009 and were worth almost nothing. Those early investors got rich and now there’s a huge pull to jump on the bandwagon in hopes of getting rich too.

But here’s another factor—and it’s definitely a major one: People don’t trust the dollar. They don’t trust the U.S. Treasury. They don’t trust the federal reserve to maintain the value of the dollar. They don’t trust the U.S. government not to spy on them. They don’t trust the nsa to keep its nose out of their credit records. They fear that someday the American government will impose limits on what people can do with their money—how much they can take out of the country at one time, for example.

It’s no coincidence that the university accepting bitcoin is in Cyprus—where the government recently confiscated savings to pay for a bailout. With bitcoin, that’s impossible.

Many of those using bitcoin want a currency that the government can’t mess with.

The dollar is backed only by people’s trust in America and its government. And that trust is so low that some people would rather trust a relatively unknown currency created by an unknown guy with an unknown value.

Several weeks ago, we wrote about how although the world deeply mistrusts the dollar, it uses it because there are no alternatives. The popularity of bitcoin shows that this unhappiness with the dollar applies not just to nations, but to individuals too.

Bitcoin, no matter how successful, won’t threaten the supremacy of the dollar—it’s too much of a niche product for that. But the Trumpet has said for years that in order to fix the eurocrisis, Europe will have to come up with a reliable and improved currency—supported by a common eurozone government. It could do that by fixing the euro. The EU could launch a new currency—perhaps backed by gold.

The whole world is crying out for such a currency. Even risk-averse savers who wouldn’t touch a bitcoin with a digital barge pole would flock to anything solid and reliable—a currency that a government won’t inflate away with money printing or quantitative easing.

Watch for the emergence of this new currency. When it arrives, the dollar is dead.
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 7:07 pm » by Aragajag


It is open source.
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 7:52 pm » by Aragajag


The calm before the storm, and as always I could be wong.
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PostTue Jan 14, 2014 11:57 pm » by mediasorcery


well jags buddy i really hope it works out for you, that would be just fantastic hey and a nice big bonus if it does translate to those things you desire,

although duk has made some great points and obviously knows a lot more than me on this subject i still wonder how you spend it without connecting to the internet? and who is swapping bitcoin for cash? at least with cash you are relatively anonymous and dont need no internet to spend it, ive phased out using credit/debit cards now i refuse to use them unless i absolutely have to, on a personal note,


my thought is once u connect to the net to spend or watever with bitcoins, your being monitored,[this is an presumtion btw]



good luck with em u guys!!!
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PostWed Jan 15, 2014 12:02 am » by TheDuck


Bobby Lee, CEO - BTC China wrote:Lee said he did not think bitcoin was a bubble asset "any more than any other asset class including real estate, stocks, currencies."


Yup, I agree with Lee.

Am I a Commy if I agree with Lee :think:

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