CF light bulbs a serious health hazard

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PostThu Feb 10, 2011 5:21 pm » by Drjones


good stuff @thesaint :clapper: Make no mistake, we ARE under attack.
@ Pindz :roll: a little bit extreme i feel mate. :lol:
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PostThu Feb 10, 2011 5:40 pm » by Funnyman46


Excellent post thesaint :flop: I sent it to every contact I know.
Sometimes, simple is better

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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 6:47 pm » by Shaggietrip


Thought I would revisit this thread. It wont be to long untill we are forced to all get these bulbs. I do not think there is a way to stop it. Even at the state level.


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I am not sure of the alternative. I was thinking, well maybe led lighting. so I looked up the hazards of them.

Safety and health

The vast majority of devices containing LEDs are "safe under all conditions of normal use", and so are classified as "Class 1 LED product"/"LED Klasse 1". At present, only a few LEDs—extremely bright LEDs that also have a tightly focused viewing angle of 8° or less—could, in theory, cause temporary blindness, and so are classified as "Class 2".[82] In general, laser safety regulations—and the "Class 1", "Class 2", etc. system—also apply to LEDs.[83]

While LEDs have the advantage over fluorescent lamps that they do not contain mercury, they may contain other hazardous metals such as lead and arsenic. A study published in 2011 states: "According to federal standards, LEDs are not hazardous except for low-intensity red LEDs, which leached Pb [lead] at levels exceeding regulatory limits (186 mg/L; regulatory limit: 5). However, according to California regulations, excessive levels of copper (up to 3892 mg/kg; limit: 2500), Pb (up to 8103 mg/kg; limit: 1000), nickel (up to 4797 mg/kg; limit: 2000), or silver (up to 721 mg/kg; limit: 500) render all except low-intensity yellow LEDs hazardous.".[84]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode


ANSES highlights risks from LED lighting

ANSES, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, has published a report entitled (in English): " Lighting systems using light-emitting diodes: health issues to be considered," which focuses squarely on potential problems caused by LED lighting.

The full report is available in French only, but the report summary (in English) says that risks have been identified concerning the use of certain LED lamps, raising potential health concerns for the general population and professionals. "The issues of most concern identified by the Agency concern the eye due to the toxic effect of blue light and the risk of glare," says the report, adding that the blue light necessary to obtain white LEDs causes "toxic stress" to the retina.

Blue light causes a photochemical risk to the eye, says the report, the level of which depends on the accumulated dose of blue light to which the person has been exposed, which is generally the result of low-intensity exposure repeated over long periods. "Blue light is…recognized as being harmful and dangerous for the retina, as a result of cellular oxidative stress," says the report, adding that 3 groups are particularly at risk; children, populations which are already light-sensitive, and workers likely to be exposed to high-intensity lighting.

The other main risk is from glare. The report say that, for indoor lighting, it is generally agreed that luminance higher than 10,000 cd/m² causes visual discomfort whatever the position of the lighting unit in the field of vision. Because the emission surfaces of LEDs are highly-concentrated point sources, the luminance of each individual source can be 1000 times higher than the discomfort level. The level of direct radiation from this type of source can therefore easily exceed the level of visual discomfort. Other risks related to the use of LED lighting systems have also been raised, but futher study is required.

The report says that the photobiological safety standard (EN 62471) seems ill-adapted to lighting systems using LEDs, and that the Unified Glaring Rate used for the other types of lighting is unsuitable for LEDs. Among various recommendations, ANSES says that only LEDs falling into risk groups similar to those of traditional lighting systems be available to the general public, and that the highest risk lighting systems be reserved for professional use under conditions in which it is possible to guarantee the safety of workers.

Manufacturers and integrators of lighting systems using LEDs are encouraged to use optics or diffusers, for example, so that the beams of light emitted by the LEDs cannot be seen directly, to avoid glare. Manufacturers should also take account of the progressive wear of layers of phosphor in white LEDs, which in time could lead to devices being moved from one photobiological risk group to a higher one, according to ANSES.

Source: http://www.ledsmagazine.com/news/7/11/13


The amount of harm from an LED, like any other lamp, is determined by the built-in protection of the product, in combination with reasonable precautions taken by the viewer. Specific to LEDs, the wider the field of light (i.e. size of the illumination source) and the brighter (higher luminance) of that source, the more potential risk it carries for the retina. Proximity to the light source is also a consideration. One should not, for example, gaze up close into a light box of blue (or even white) LEDs for longer than 100 seconds (the maximum recommendation from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection). On the other hand, a small array of white LEDs (which contain some of the blue spectrum) in a lamp used for task lighting would probably cause little problem.

More info on all lighting and source: http://www.mdsupport.org/library/hazard.html

So doing a little research I came upon this type of lighting.

Electron Stimulated Luminescence

Electron Stimulated Luminescence (ESL) is light produced by accelerated electrons hitting a phosphor (fluorescent) surface in a process known as cathodoluminescence.[1][2][3] The light generation process is similar to a cathode ray tube (CRT) but lacks magnetic or electrostatic deflection.[4]

A cathodoluminescent lighting system has a light emitting device having a transparent glass envelope coated on the inside with a light-emitting phosphor layer. Electrons emitted from a cathode strike the phosphor; the current returns through a transparent conductive coating on the envelope. The phosphor layer emits light through the transparent face of the envelope. The system also has a power supply for providing at least five thousand volts of power to the light emitting device, and the electrons transiting from cathode to anode are essentially unfocused. Additional circuits allow triac-type dimmers to control the light level.[5] The light has a rated color rendering index of 85.[6] The energy consumption is 70 % less than that of an incandescent light bulb. The 10,000 hour lifetime is five times longer than an incandescent light bulb.[7] Light is generated instantly when power is applied. The cost is estimated at 12 EUR per bulb in 2010.[8]

Incandescent bulbs produce light by heating a wire with current. Fluorescent lamp produce light by exciting mercury vapor in a plasma process which in turn radiate UV light towards a phosphor layer that converts the light into the visible spectrum.

ESL lamps do not use mercury in the lighting process [9] The first commercially available ESL product is a reflector bulb in the R‐30 shape which was briefly available through the manufacturer's web site but direct sales were stopped as of May 23, 2011, in anticipation of outsourcing this activity.[10] An A19-type "Edison" light bulb is expected to be ready for market by mid-2011.

Independent product testing and anecdotal feedback suggests ESL boasts better light quality than both LED and CFL bulbs, with full dimmability. Drawbacks included a slightly larger-than-normal base (which favors newer recessed "can" installations) and a slight delay in illumination when switched on, similar to CFLs.[11]


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_stimulated_luminescence

There are no toxic materials in a Vu1® bulb. While we encourage recycling of all consumer products where practical, the Vu1® bulb is household waste disposable – it can go in your “trash can” and will not impact your local landfill.

Source: http://vu1corporation.com/about.php

So if and when forced to change I may be going the ESL[Electron Stimulated Luminescence] route. Providing I dont find hidden hazards or hear of another alternative. Has any one else looked into what really is the best/safest bulb we could use at this time?




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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 7:18 pm » by Mrmcnuggets


drjones wrote:
stratosfear wrote:Hate the bloody things. But you can't get the old fashioned ones anymore.


YES YOU CAN, Poundland still have them. It is still legal to sell what stock of the old bulbs you have left. :D



wait wait wait,

Are normal light bulbs no longer being produced? (or just for you guys in the UK??)
I have boooooxxxxxeeess of normal light bulbs lol. :peep:
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die. "

I AM an endangered species.


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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 8:47 pm » by Shaggietrip


mrmcnuggets wrote:
drjones wrote:
stratosfear wrote:Hate the bloody things. But you can't get the old fashioned ones anymore.


YES YOU CAN, Poundland still have them. It is still legal to sell what stock of the old bulbs you have left. :D



wait wait wait,

Are normal light bulbs no longer being produced? (or just for you guys in the UK??)
I have boooooxxxxxeeess of normal light bulbs lol. :peep:






Incandescent light bulb phaseout begins Jan. 1


The nation's light bulbs begin facing new efficiency and labeling standards starting Jan. 1, but don't expect old-fashioned incandescents to suddenly disappear from store shelves.

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

By Michael R. Brown

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

Enlarge

By Michael R. Brown

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

The congressionally mandated efficiency standards gradually phase out Thomas Edison's 131-year-old creation in favor of other light bulbs that use at least 25% less energy. The first to go, beginning Sunday, is the traditional 100-watt, followed in January 2013 with the 75-watt version and in January 2014 with the 40-watt and 60-watt bulbs.

Yet even Edison's 100-watt bulb will still be available for a while. The bipartisan law mandating the phaseout, which President George W. Bush signed in 2007, says the bulbs can't be manufactured or imported after Jan. 1 but lets stores sell them until stock runs out.

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/manufacturing/story/2011-12-28/light-bulb-rules/52256656/1
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 8:50 pm » by Mrmcnuggets


shaggietrip wrote:Incandescent light bulb phaseout begins Jan. 1


The nation's light bulbs begin facing new efficiency and labeling standards starting Jan. 1, but don't expect old-fashioned incandescents to suddenly disappear from store shelves.

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

By Michael R. Brown

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

Enlarge

By Michael R. Brown

An inspector looks over LED bulbs made at Lighting Sciences Group in Satellite Beach, Fla.

The congressionally mandated efficiency standards gradually phase out Thomas Edison's 131-year-old creation in favor of other light bulbs that use at least 25% less energy. The first to go, beginning Sunday, is the traditional 100-watt, followed in January 2013 with the 75-watt version and in January 2014 with the 40-watt and 60-watt bulbs.

Yet even Edison's 100-watt bulb will still be available for a while. The bipartisan law mandating the phaseout, which President George W. Bush signed in 2007, says the bulbs can't be manufactured or imported after Jan. 1 but lets stores sell them until stock runs out.

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/manufacturing/story/2011-12-28/light-bulb-rules/52256656/1



:flop:
thanks man, wow. Shits crazy, guess im probably moving to LED lights. fuck those EF ones, they're all sorts of bad news.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die. "

I AM an endangered species.


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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 9:11 pm » by Mydogma


mrmcnuggets wrote:
drjones wrote:
stratosfear wrote:Hate the bloody things. But you can't get the old fashioned ones anymore.


YES YOU CAN, Poundland still have them. It is still legal to sell what stock of the old bulbs you have left. :D



wait wait wait,

Are normal light bulbs no longer being produced? (or just for you guys in the UK??)
I have boooooxxxxxeeess of normal light bulbs lol. :peep:



Keewp them they culd be worth something sooner then later..haha actually u could prob double ur money soon..go get more!
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 9:21 pm » by Mydogma


I have bEen a hater of cfl back to 2007, and I'm a green builder......I was fortunate enough to be one of 20 teams across canada that were selected to design net zero housing of future with cmhc eq program...it was there I clued into the sham that if u live in a .ajority heating season they don't even save energy...its a sham...instead now they outlaw the incandelesnt bulbs and make us put in bulbs that ar xXxtimes more expensive, will poison us with a substance that is cumulative in our bodies(we don't pee it out) and is a toxic waste when bulb dies...and this is green...I have made a little website(not good one so don't be picky) talking abot this exact thing..www.ecoenergyrenos.com....we are being givin the sales pitch of bs on sooooo much stuff its sickening...thanks fro the post
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 9:23 pm » by Mrmcnuggets


mydogma wrote:Keewp them they culd be worth something sooner then later..haha actually u could prob double ur money soon..go get more!



Time to hit the dollar store. :lol:

I agree dogma, the whole energy efficient bulbs is a sham, hell even energy efficient appliances do not work "more efficiently" unless your house is wired properly and has the right wall outlets for them. :yell:
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die. "

I AM an endangered species.


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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 9:42 pm » by 1ofakind


I am sick of these bulbs, less than a month ago Tesco had them in stock for pennys and I mean about 8 pennys. Just before Christmas I noticed the same bulbs costing between 2 to 3 quid for one bulb. My experience of them is that a lot of the time they make a strange high pitched sound, flicker alot and explode (I have been showerd in glass on more than five occasions by these shitty light bulbs that are highly toxic). These things are dangerous and can only be disposed of in a so called green way. Some twat is making some cash out of this.


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