Comet 15 times brighter than the Moon to cross night sky

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PostFri Sep 28, 2012 6:05 pm » by Richc


Is this one a comet.?

4179 Toutatis (1989 AC)

It will pass Earth on Dec 12th 2012 ( 12/12/12 ) and is 5.4 km wide and only 18 Luna Distance at nearest point... :|

Its the biggest object on JPL site i've seen for some time......

http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=4179;orb=1

http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/ca/

RIK
"Theres A Storm Coming!"

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PostSat Oct 06, 2012 11:06 pm » by Arella


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Posted by Bob Berman on October 6, 2012 in Nature, Night Sky

About a year from now, Comet ISON may become the brightest comet that anyone alive has ever seen. It will be the greatest astronomical event of next winter. But one caveat: How bright any comet gets is always somewhat uncertain, and this one is now receiving vigorous analysis among planetary astronomers and comet experts.

Two Russian astronomers, Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok, discovered the comet on September 21. They used a 16-inch reflector telescope of the International Scientific Optical Network, whose abbreviation, ISON, has thankfully been made the official name of the comet. Otherwise we would have had to deal with “Comet Nevski-Novichonok.”

Although the comet was super-faint when discovered (at magnitude 18.8, it was about 100 times dimmer than Pluto), its calculated orbit will carry it extraordinarily close to the Sun, and then a few weeks later, very close to Earth. At the end of November 2013, the comet will approach to a mere 1.1 million miles of the Sun, or 30 times closer to the Sun than the charbroiled planet Mercury. This should not quite destroy it, but instead cause much of its ices to sublimate into a spectacularly long tail, releasing trapped pebbles and dust that will also spread out for a million miles or more. Unfortunately, it will then hover only 4.4 degrees north of the Sun, and it will probably be unseen in the solar glare.

Immediately after reaching this solar near-point, or perihelion, Comet ISON heads in a direction optimally favorable for us: north. Developing an ever-greater, even-more-spectacular tail, it should be as bright as Venus, and may even cast shadows! We in the Northern Hemisphere will get the best views as Christmas approaches. Then, on January 8, 2014, the comet passes just two degrees from Polaris, the North Star, as it zooms just 37.2 million miles from Earth.

A “Great Comet” like this impending Comet ISON arrives every 15 to 20 years on average. The last one was Comet McNaught in 2007, which was the brightest comet in 40 years. Unfortunately for us, it was seen only in the Southern Hemisphere, and we didn’t even get a glimpse of it. This new one will have opposite characteristics: It won’t be seen in Australia at all.

Before that, we had the odd circumstance of getting two great comets in consecutive years, with Hyakutake in 1996 and then the brilliant, universally observed Hale-Bopp in 1997: the brightest comet in decades. Because it’s now 15 years since that one, we are “due.”

This is very exciting.


Astronomy Now is awkwardly calling “a once-in-a-civilisation’s-lifetime” event. The comet expert John E. Bortle is already comparing ISON with the Great Comet of 1680, which, according to contemporary accounts, caused the people of New York’s Manhattan Island to be “overcome with terror at a sight in the heavens such as has seldom greeted human eyes…. In the province of New York a day of fasting and humiliation was appointed, in order that the wrath of God might be assuaged.”

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 11:48 am » by Arella


Comet ISON Simulation and Info (HD)



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Comet C/2012 SI (ISON) How bright will it get?(INTERESTING)


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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 12:30 pm » by Hardline35


could it be seen in Australia ????? :nails:

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 12:36 pm » by Hardline35


can't have them all AH!!!!!

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 12:37 pm » by Arella


Hardline35 wrote:could it be seen in Australia ????? :nails:


assuming the comet does not fade away like some comets of the past, for those in the southern hemisphere the best chance to see Comet ISON will be from mid to late November 2013 in the mornings before sunrise and in the daytime about the date of perihelion on 29 November 2013.

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PostWed Oct 17, 2012 1:54 pm » by Arella


Starwatch: A sibling for Newton's Comet?

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A comet found recently beyond the orbit of Jupiter could well become spectacular late next year and may be a sibling of one of the most celebrated comets of all time.

What is formally known as Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was not at first recognised as a comet when it was spotted as a 19th magnitude object using a small Russian telescope of the International Scientific Optical Network on 21 September. Earlier images have been found stretching back to last year, allowing its orbit to be calculated and showing that it is destined to sweep within 1.2 million km of the Sun's surface at perihelion on 28 November 2013. Some predictions claim that it could rival the full moon in brightness at that time.

Its orbit resembles that of Kirch's Comet, the Great Comet of 1680, which hangs over Rotterdam in our illustration from a painting by the Dutch artist Lieve Verschuier. After becoming the first comet to be discovered telescopically, this brightened enough to be glimpsed in broad daylight. Sir Isaac Newton was also to demonstrate that the comet's parabolic orbit was perfect harmony with his law of universal gravitation, promulgated only seven year later in his famous work, the Principia. As a consequence, the comet is also known as Newton's Comet.

This is not to say that the comet of 1680 and Comet ISON are the same object since both probably take thousands of years to orbit the Sun. However, it is possible that both are fragments, albeit substantial ones, of a comet that broke apart many thousands of years ago when the heat stress at perihelion became too much.

The fact that Comet ISON is seen easily so far from the Sun suggests that it is large enough to survive its solar encounter and that it will not fizzle out as some close-approach comets have done before. That fate is still possible, and the predictions of its appearance that follow can be little more than guesses at this stage.

Its path is known accurately, though, and for once observers in the northern hemisphere are well placed to follow it. After passing very close to Mars and Regulus in our eastern predawn sky in mid-October next year, it should brighten to naked eye visibility during November as it dives towards the Sun.

Comet ISON lies close to Spica in Virgo on the 18th and near Mercury and Saturn a few days later, with any tail slanting up and to the right in the morning twilight. Following perihelion it reappears in our western evening sky with its tail short at first but growing rapidly, again upwards and to the right. It may still be an impressive sight as it passes closest to the Earth at the safe distance of 64 million km on Boxing Day.

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PostWed Oct 17, 2012 2:12 pm » by *WillEase*


when?

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PostWed Oct 17, 2012 2:14 pm » by Arella


willease666 wrote:when?


Hi willease,

If you mean when's the comet coming, start from the beginning and work your way through, that should answer your question...wont take too long.

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PostWed Oct 17, 2012 2:48 pm » by *WillEase*


Arella wrote:
willease666 wrote:when?


Hi willease,

If you mean when's the comet coming, start from the beginning and work your way through, that should answer your question...wont take too long.


You know, you could have just said "late next year" and saved me the time. :censored:


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