fizzy pop can give you a high

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 9:43 am » by Truthseeker


just like in the film charlie and the choclate factory fizzy pop can give you a high it makes your body go into a reaction just like gasses traped under ground you need to get the gas out of your body either from burping like in the film charlie and his granpa did or out of your body some other way ,this seems funny but why drink water that is full of gas pay large amounts of money for it and think it is good for you ,why because you think its cool refreshing and full of media hype ,they tell you to drink it so you do .Mr ASPERTAME lurkes in the zero stuff the no added sugar special type that kills you like smoking in small doses it gradualy destroys your body enjoy paying to iradicate yourselves and enjoy the gass bubbles its the real thing you now life you only have one so use it safely .

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 9:48 am » by Truthseeker


lets find ASPERTAME IN ALL WE EAT AND DRINK .
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Aspartame has established itself as an important component in many low-calorie, sugar-free foods and beverages and is primarily responsible for the growth over the last two decades in the sugar-free market. The safety of aspartame has been affirmed by the U.S. FDA 26 times in the past 23 years.

Currently, aspartame is consumed by over 200 million people around the world and is found in more than 6,000 products including carbonated soft drinks, powdered soft drinks, chewing gum, confections, gelatins, dessert mixes, puddings and fillings, frozen desserts, yogurt, tabletop sweeteners, and some pharmaceuticals such as vitamins and sugar-free cough drops. In the United States, all food ingredients, including aspartame, must be listed in the ingredient statement on the food label.

Several tabletop sweeteners containing aspartame as the sweetening ingredient can be used in a wide variety of recipes. However, in some recipes requiring lengthy heating or baking, a loss of sweetness may occur; this is not a safety issue - simply the product may not be as sweet as desired. Therefore, it is best to use tabletop sweeteners with aspartame in specially designed recipes available from the manufacturers of these tabletop sweeteners. Aspartame tabletop sweeteners may also be added to some recipes at the end of heating to maintain sweetness.


The Following Reduced Calorie Products Have Aspartame-Sweetened Choices
Breath Mints
Carbonated Soft Drinks
Cereals
Chewing Gum
Flavored Syrups for Coffee
Flavored Water Products
Frozen Ice
Frozen Ice Cream Novelties
Fruit Spreads
Gelatin, Sugar Free
Hard Candies
Ice cream Toppings
Ice Creams, No Sugar Added or Sugar Free
Iced Tea, Powder
Iced Tea, Ready to Drink
Instant Cocoa Mix
Jams & Jellies
Juice Blends
Juice Drinks
Maple Syrups
Meal Replacements
Mousse
No Sugar Added Pies
Non-Carbonated Diet Soft drinks
Nutritional Bars
Powdered Soft Drinks
Protein Nutritional Drinks
Pudding
Soft Candy Chews
Sugar Free Chocolate Syrup
Sugar Free Cookies
Sugar Free Ketchup
Table Top Sweeteners
Vegetable Drinks
Yogurt, Drinkable
Yogurt, Fat Free
Yogurt, Sugar Free

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 9:49 am » by Truthseeker


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Frequently Asked Questions about the Use of Aspartame in Low-Calorie Foods and Beverages
Click here for PDF version of the Aspartame FAQs

What is aspartame?
What is aspartame composed of?
Why is aspartame used?
What types of products contain aspartame?
How can you tell there is aspartame in a product?
Can aspartame be used in cooking or baking?
How do foods and beverages sweetened with aspartame fit into healthful eating?
Can aspartame help people lose weight?
Is aspartame safe?
Have other regulatory bodies reviewed aspartame's safety?
Have independent health organizations reviewed the safety of aspartame?
How was aspartame tested before it was approved for use in foods?
How is aspartame handled in the body?
What is methanol and is it a problem in consuming aspartame?

What is the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of aspartame?

Is it safe to consume more aspartame than the ADI?

How much aspartame would a person have to consume to reach the ADI?

How much aspartame are people actually consuming?

How much aspartame are children consuming?

What is phenylketonuria (PKU) and why is there a statement regarding PKU on products sweetened with aspartame?

Can women who are pregnant or breastfeeding consume aspartame?

Can people with diabetes consume aspartame?

Does aspartame affect blood sugar control in people with diabetes?

Does aspartame cause adverse health effects?

Does aspartame cause allergic reactions?

Is there a relationship between aspartame and headaches?

Is aspartame safe for people with epilepsy?

Does aspartame cause changes in mood, thought processes or behavior?
Does aspartame affect children's behavior?

Does aspartame increase appetite or cause weight gain?

Is there any relationship between aspartame and cancer or brain tumors?

Can aspartame affect vision?

Is it true that aspartame is an "excitotoxin?"

Is there any truth to the negative information about aspartame on the Internet or in the media?


Is there a relationship between aspartame and multiple sclerosis?

Is there a relationship between aspartame and Parkinson's disease?

Is there a relationship between aspartame and Alzheimer's disease?

Is there a relationship between aspartame and lupus?


What is aspartame?
Aspartame (L-a-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) is a low-calorie sweetener used to sweeten a wide variety of low- and reduced-calorie foods and beverages, including low-calorie tabletop sweeteners.


What is aspartame composed of?
Aspartame is composed of two amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, as the methyl ester. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Aspartic acid and phenylalanine are also found naturally in protein containing foods, including meats, grains and dairy products. Methyl esters are also found naturally in many foods, such as fruits and vegetables and their juices.


Why is aspartame used?
Aspartame is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar, tastes like sugar, can enhance fruit flavors, saves calories and does not contribute to tooth decay. Products sweetened with aspartame can be useful as part of a healthful diet.


What types of products contain aspartame?
Aspartame is found in about 6000 products around the world, including carbonated soft drinks, powdered soft drinks, chewing gum, confections, gelatins, dessert mixes, puddings and fillings, frozen desserts, yogurt, tabletop sweeteners, and some pharmaceuticals such as vitamins and sugar-free cough drops.


More FAQ’s

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 9:52 am » by Truthseeker


Aspartame Products As
A Potential Danger To
Infants, Children &
Future Generations


By Dr. H. J. Roberts, MD, FACP, FCCP
Director - Palm Beach Institute For Medical Researh
3-29-6

The chemicals we ingest may affect more than our own health. They affect the health and vitality of future generations. The danger is that many of these chemicals may not harm us but will do silent violence to our children. Senator Abraham S. Ribicoff (l971)

I have studied the numerous adverse effects of products containing the chemical aspartame for a quarter century as a corporate-neutral physician (Board-certified internist; member of the Endocrine Society and American Academy of Neurology). I encompassed them as "aspartame disease" in my large text published in 2001. They have been detailed in the articles, letters and books listed below.

The prime motive for this ongoing effort was the apparent enormous toll in illness, disability and death attributable to aspartame disease and failure of the medical profession and many governmental and other public health agencies to concern themselves with this ignored epidemic. The fact that over two-thirds of adults in our society consume aspartame products, and approximately 40 percent of children, often in prodigious amounts, provides perspective.

Perhaps the most grievous aspect pertains to the damage that these products can induce in infants and children. Moreover, aspartame could affect subsequent generations borne to mothers who were misled about the safety of this and related chemicals. Indeed, some who regard the widespread promotion of aspartame products to these groups as "crimes against humanity" have urged the banning of aspartame products as an imminent health threat.

A case in point is the full page ad that appeared in Function Foods & Nutraceuticals (November 2004) titled, "Remember your first taste of aspartame?", depicting an infant feeding at its mother,s breast. It noted that the chief ingredients of aspartame are two building blocks of protein " just like those founds in eggs, fruit cheese or fish and even in mothers, milk."

In my January 2005 objection to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission about such perceived deceptive advertising in "a material respect", I listed the following reasons: "(1) omission of other major components of aspartame, especially the 10% ­­­­­free methyl alcohol (methanol), (2) the profound adverse effects of the large amounts of its two building blocks of protein, on neurotransmitters and other important systems, and (3) the absence of any references to the terrible reactions induced by aspartame products in numerous infants and children."

Aspartame Disease in Infants and Children

The manifestations of aspartame disease in young children are legion and continue to be unraveled. They include severe headache, convulsions, unexplained visual loss, rashes, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, obesity, marked weight loss, hypoglycemia, diabetes, addiction (probably largely due to the methyl alcohol), hyperthyroidism, and a host of neuropsychiatric features. The latter include extreme fatigue, irritability, hyperactivity, depression, antisocial behavior (including suicide), poor school performance, the deterioration of intelligence, and brain tumors.

Each of these disorders and the underlying mechanisms is detailed in my books, especially Aspartame Disease: An Ignored Epidemic. They tend to be magnified in patients with unrecognized hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), hypoglycemia (low blood sugar reactions), diabetes and phenylketonuria (PKU). Persons with PKU lack the enzyme needed for handling phenylalanine, one of the amino acids. (Its dramatic increase in the body can cause severe neurological and other damage if aspartame abstinence and other dietary precautions are not instituted.)

It is my further opinion that exposure to aspartame products and other neurotoxins may initiate or aggravate changes in the nervous system that result in multiple sclerosis, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer,s disease. The latter issue is detailed in my book, Defense Against Alzheimer,s Disease.

Pregnant Women and Nursing Mothers

I continue to urge ALL pregnant women and mothers who breast-feed to avoid aspartame products advice that many of my obstetric colleagues have adopted. This caution has been dramatically demonstrated by the occurrence of convulsions in suckling infants as the mother drank an aspartame soda. The scientific grounds for the foregoing continue to increase. They include:

* exposure of the fetus to considerable phenylalanine and methanol * maternal malnutrition associated with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and a reduction of calories * transmission of aspartame and its breakdown components via the mother,s milk * the increased "allergic load," thereby risking future hypersensitivity problems


Birth Defects and Subsequent Generational Stigmas

The finding of cumulative aspartame metabolites in DNA clearly has profound implications. I have described severe problems in the fetus or the infants of parents including father who consumed much aspartame at the time of conception and/or during pregnancy.

Epidemiological studies will be necessary to corroborate the role of aspartame consumption in medical, neurological, metabolic, immune and neoplastic disorders involving subsequent generations.

The Urgent Need for Action

It is clear to all who have studied the matter that the initial approval of aspartame by the FDA in l981 in the face of severe objections from its in-house scientists, consultants for the General Accounting Office, and even a Public Board of Inquiry was an erroneous political decision. This opinion is supported by considerable clinical experience, an increasing number of credible scientific studies, and demographic evidence relating to the contributory role of aspartame sodas and other products in the dramatic increase of obesity, diabetes, attention deficit disorder, brain tumors and other malignancies in children.

In the light of this information, it is incumbent upon governmental agencies and consumers to severely curtail or stop the use of ALL aspartame products including vitamins, drugs and supplements. This also applies to a number of derivatives of aspartame and other chemicals that have not been evaluated by corporate-neutral investigators over sufficient periods of time using real-world products. Failure to do so invites the tragedy of a human "silent spring."


By Dr. H. J. Roberts, MD, FACP, FCCP Director - Palm Beach Institute For Medical Researh, Inc PO Box 17799 West Palm Beach, Florida 33416 hjrobertsmd@aol.comhjrobertsmd@aol.com 561 588-7628 Fax 561 547 8008


REFERENCES

Roberts, H. J.: Neurologic, psychiatric and behavioral reactions to aspartame in 505 aspartame reactors. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Dietary Phenylalanine and Brain Function edited by R. J. Wurtman and E. Ritter-Walker, Washington, D.C., May 8-10, l987, pp. 477-481 Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame (NutraSweet) associated confusion and memory loss: A Possible human model for early Alzheimer,s disease. Abstract 306. Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Boston, February 13, l988. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame (NutraSweet) associated epilepsy. Clinical Research l988; 36:349A. Roberts, H. J.: Complications associated with aspartame (NutraSweet) in diabetics. Clinical Research l988:3:489A Roberts, H .J.: The Aspartame Problem. Statement for Committee on Labor and Human Resources, U.S. Senate, Hearing on "NutraSweet" Health and Safety Concerns, November 3, l987, 83-178, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, l988, pp. 466-467 Roberts, H. J.: Reactions attributed to aspartame-containing products: 551 cases, Journal of Applied Nutrition l988; 40:85-94 Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame (NutraSweet): Is It Safe? Philadelphia, The Charles Press, 1989 Roberts, H. J.: Does aspartame cause human brain cancer? Journal of Advancement in Medicine 1991: 4 (Winter):231-241 Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame-associated confusion and memory loss. Townsend Letter for Doctors 1991:June:442-443. Roberts, H. J.: Myasthenia gravis associated with aspartame use. Townsend Letter for Doctors 1991;August/September:699-700. Roberts, H. J.: Joint pain associated with aspartame use. Townsend Letter for Doctors 1991;May:375-376. Roberts, H.J.: Sweet,ner Dearest: Bittersweet Vignettes About Aspartame (NutraSweet) West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, Inc. l992. Roberts, H.J.: Unexplained headaches and seizures. Townsend Letter for Doctors, 1992: 1001-1002. Roberts, H.J.: Safety of aspartame (Letter) Townsend Letter for Doctors 1992: November:977-978. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame: Is it safe? Interview with H. J. Roberts, M.D., Mastering Food Allergies 1992: 7 (#1), 3-6. Roberts, H. J.: Testimony: Analysis of Adverse Reactions to Monosodium Glutamate. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Bethesda, April 8, 1993. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame (NutraSweet) NOHA News 1993; Winter:5-6. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame-associated dry mouth (xerostomia). Townsend Letter for Doctors 1993; February/March:201-202. Roberts, H. J.: "Dry eyes" from use of aspartame (NutraSweet). Townsend Letter for Doctors 1994;January:82-83. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame as a cause for diarrhea in diabetics. Townsend Letter for Doctors 1994; June:623-624. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame and headache. Neurology 1995; 45:1631-1633. Roberts, H. J.: Defense Against Alzheimer,s Disease: A Rational Blueprint for - Prevention. West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press. 1995. Roberts, H. J.: Lactose Intolerance. (Letter) New England Journal of Medicine 1995; 333:1359 Roberts, H. J.: Memory loss and aspartame. Townsend Letter for Doctors 1995; August/September:99-100 Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame as a cause of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Archives of Internal Medicine. 1996; 156:1027 Roberts, H. J.: Critique of the Official Australia and New Zealand Food Authority (ANZFA) Position on Aspartame. Soil & Health 1997; July/September:15. Roberts, H .J.: Preclinical Alzheimer,s disease (Letter) Neurology 1997; 48-549-55. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame effects during pregnancy and childhood. (Letter) Latitudes 1997; 3 (Number 1):3 Roberts, H. J.: "Dry eyes" from use of aspartame. Associated insights concerning the Sjogren syndrome. Focus (Information Forum For Retinal Degenerative Disorders) 1998: Volume 3 (No. 3):16-17. Roberts, H. J.: Submission to FDA regarding Docket No. 981F-0052 (Food Additive Petition for Neotame), March 3, 1998. Roberts, H. J.: What,s blinding the world? Focus (Information Forum for Retinal Degenerative Disorders) 1998; Volume 3 (No. 3): 15-16 Roberts, H. J.: Ignored Health Hazards for Pilots and Drivers: The A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H File West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 1998. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame toxicity denied Dr. Roberts responds. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 1998; April:110-113. Roberts, H. J.: The CACOF Conspiracy: Lessons of the New The CACOF Conspiracy: - Lessons of the New Millennium. West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 1998. Roberts, H. J.: Unrecognized aspartame disease in silicone breast implant patients. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 1998; May:74-75. Roberts, H. J.: Unrecognized Aspartame Disease in Silicone Breast Implant Patients. Solicited Statement for the Committee on the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants, Institute for Medicine, Washington, D.C. Submitted on June 4, 1998. Roberts, H. J.: Breast Implants or Aspartame (NutraSweet) Disease? The Suppressed Opinion About a Perceived Medicolegal Travesty. West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 1999. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame (NutraSweet) addiction. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2000; January (#198): 52-57. Roberts, H. J.: Carpal tunnel syndrome due to aspartame disease. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2000; November: 82-84. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame Disease: An Ignored Epidemic, West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 2001. Roberts, H.J.: Response to the assessment by the Alzheimer,s Association concerning Research and prevention of Alzheimer,s disease. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2001; May:111-112. Roberts, H .J.: The labeling minefield, with emphasis on aspartame. Nutrition Health Review 2001; #80:6. Roberts, H. J.: Reply and commentary to the NutraSweet Company,s senior medical Consultant. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2001; October:93-95. Roberts, H. J.: Pseudotumor cerebri due to aspartame disease. Townsend Letter For Doctors & Patients 2002;June:66-68. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame-induced dyspnea and pulmonary hypertension. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2003; January:6465. Roberts, H .J.: Useful Insights for Diagnosis Treatment and Public Health. West Palm Beach, Palm Beach Institute for Medical Research, 2002. Roberts, H. J.: The trouble with sweeteners. Nutrition Health Review 2003; July (#85): 3-6. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame disease: A possible cause for concomitant Graves,disease and Pulmonary hypertension. Texas Heart Institute Journal. 2004; 31:105 Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame-induced arrhythmias and sudden death. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2004; May:121. Roberts, H. J.: The potential hazard of aspartame absorption from within the mouth. Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients 2004; July:100. Roberts, H. J.: Aspartame Disease: An Ignored Epidemic. 3 cassette audio set. (ISBN - 1-884243-207). West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 2005. Roberts, H. J.: Mommylinks to Health: Aspartame (NutraSweet) Disease. CD (1-884243-134) West Palm Beach, Sunshine Sentinel Press, 2005.

(Dr. Roberts can be seen in the aspartame documentary: Sweet Misery: A Poisoned World, <http://www.amazon.com/www.amazon.com or Barnes & Noble. He is an internationally known medical consultant and researcher. He is listed in Who,s Who in America, Who,s Who in The World, Who,s Who in Science and Engineering, and The Best Doctors in the U.S. He has been knighted by the Order of St. George for his humanitarianism. The publisher,s web site is <http://www.sunsentpress.com/www.sunsentpress.com or 1 800 827 7991. Many of the reports in his references can be read on <http://www.dorway.com/www.dorway.com and <http://www.wnho.net/www.wnho.net )

Dr. Betty Martini, D.Hum, Founder Mission Possible International 9270 River Club Parkway Duluth, Georgia 30097 770 242-2599

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 10:07 am » by Truthseeker


ITS COMING FROM CHINA AND YOU WILL EAT AND DRINK IT .
Sweeteners: Information
Sweeteners are food additives used to add a sweet flavor to foods and beverages. In general, there are two categories of sweeteners: nutritive and nonnutritive.

Nutritive sweeteners are those that contain calories, such as sucrose (refined sugar). Other nutritive sweeteners include: mannitol (extracted from seaweed), sorbitol (extracted from corn syrup) and xylitol (extracted from birch wood or fruits), which are sugar alcohols. Sugar alcohols occur naturally and are used in some foods as additives. While sugar alcohols do contain calories, they do not raise blood sugar levels significantly.

Nonnutritive sweeteners provide very little or no calories. Commonly used nonnutritive sweeteners include: saccharin (Sweet N Low brand), aspartame (Equal and NutraSweet brands), sucralose (Splenda brand), and stevia, which is only approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a dietary supplement.

Pros and Cons
Sucrose: (refined sugar) Pros: Sugar is naturally occurring in various forms, and in moderate consumption in healthy individuals is not associated with serious health risks. Sugar provides a pleasant flavoring in various foods. Cons: Sugar is high in calories, and consuming large amounts may lead to serious health problems such as diabetes and obesity. It is not safe for individuals with diabetes to consume large amounts of sugar.
Sugar alcohols: (mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol Pros: these sweeteners are naturally occurring and are not associated with health risks. They do not raise blood sugar significantly, and may also decrease the incidence of tooth decay. Cons: May cause unpleasant gastrointestinal discomfort such as diarrhea, bloating, and gas.
Saccharin: (Sweet N Low brand) Pros: Saccharin provides a calorie free sweet taste to foods, and may help decrease incidence of tooth decay. Although studies have linked consumption of large amounts of saccharin to cancer in rats, it has not been proven to have to same effect in humans. In 2000, the US government removed saccharin from its list of cancer-causing agents. Cons: The possible cancer connection in humans is still not completely clear.
Aspartame: (NutraSweet and Equal brands) Aspartame is made up of amino acids and methyl alcohol. Pros: Aspartame provides a calorie free sweet taste to foods, and may help decrease incidence of tooth decay. Cons: Aspartame has been associated with a variety of unpleasant side effects such as gastrointestinal discomfort, headaches, and mood swings. It is thought that aspartame may reduce the availability of the amino acid tryptophan, thereby reducing levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain. Individuals with phenylketonuria should avoid aspartame. More research is needed on the health impacts of aspartame.
Sucralose: (Splenda brand) Sucralose is the result of the replacement of the hydroxyl molecule groups with chlorine in sucrose (refined sugar). Pros: Sucralose provides a calorie free sweet taste to foods, and may help decrease the incidence of tooth decay. Studies so far show no health risks associated with sucralose. Cons: The FDA only approved sucralose for use as a food additive in 1998. Long term health effects of consumption of sucralose are not currently known.
Stevia: Stevia, or stevioside, is derived from the leaves of a South American shrub, a member of the daisy family. Pros: Stevia provides a calorie free sweet taste to foods, and may help decrease the incidence of tooth decay. Many who hesitate to consume artificial food additives may prefer stevia because it is all natural. Cons: Stevia is not approved in the US, Canada, or the European Union as a food additive because not enough is known about its safety. In the US, stevia may only be sold as a dietary supplement. Stevia> may also have unpleasant side effects including dizziness, headache, muscle tenderness and gastrointestinal discomfort. More research may need to be conducted to determine the safety of stevia.
Usage Indications
Use as directed. Consult your physician about sweeteners, especially if you have health problems

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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 10:18 am » by Truthseeker


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Sugar, Sugars and Sweeteners - The Definitive Guide

Introduction
Sugar the Nickname vs. Sugar the General Term
Artificial vs. Natural
Nutritive vs. Non-nutritive Sweeteners
The Definitive List
Notes on the How the List was Compiled
Introduction
With so many different types of sweetener being added to our food and drink these days and with so many different names being used for each, it can be a minefield to unravel the definitions and understand the implications for our health. I have spent the last week creating a structured, definitive list and some clear definitions. The aim is to evolve this page into a one-stop shop for understanding sweeteners and their effects.

This is work-in-progress document. I will regularly improve and refine the notes on each sweetener and record the changes as they happen in the comments. If you see something you believe to be incorrect or have additional information that would improve the page, add a comment yourself, including (if possible) a reference to support the change. I will review any comments and make changes as appropriate.
Sugars vs. Sweeteners
Sugars are carbohydrates that have particular molecular characteristics – there are many varieties and they have widely differing properties. Sweetener is a more general term, referring to any substance that can be used to make something taste sweeter. This includes some sugars - for example, glucose. Other sweeteners, such as Aspartame, are not sugars.

N.B. Strictly speaking all carbohydrates are sugars, but we do not need to worry about that here.
Sugar the Nickname vs. Sugar the General Term
This can be confusing for newcomers to the topic and is the most important to get straight from the start. As mentioned above, there are many kinds of sugar. However, when people talk about ‘Sugar’, especially in the context of food, they are often referring to Sucrose, one particular sugar. Certainly when you see the word in the list of ingredients for a product, this is what it means. Sucrose has acquired the nickname ‘Sugar’ over the years because it is the most commonly used sugar. It has acquired many other names too, as you will see in the definitive list.

A good illustration of this is a dried fruit like figs. You will not see the word ‘Sugar’ in the ingredients list of a packet of dried figs - yet in the nutritional breakdown it might say Carbohydrate, of which sugars – 65g. This is because whilst there is no sucrose in the figs, there is naturally occurring fructose and glucose – which are themselves sugars.
Artificial vs. Natural
The term natural sweeteners is typically understood to mean substances that can already be found in plants or animals, unlike artificial sweeteners, which cannot. Often, natural sweeteners only occur in very small amounts in nature and undergo much processing before they find their way into our foods.

For example, fructose is a natural sweetener – it is responsible for some or all of the sweetness in most fruits. However, it is also found in high fructose corn syrup, a highly processed sweetener derived from corn. Likewise, Tagatose is found in small amounts in dairy products, but used as a sweetener in concentrated form.

Acesulfame potassium (also known as Acesulfame K, Sunett, Sweet One or E950) is an artificial sweetener, often found in canned drinks marketed as being sugar free. It was formulated by a German chemical company and is not found in plants or animals.

Nutritive vs. Non-nutritive Sweeteners
The definition of nutritive sweeteners is that they have calories, whereas non-nutritive sweeteners do not. However, this is broad distinction and not always clear; it should not be taken as a guide to whether a sweetener is the right choice, because within these categories there are wide variations.
Nutritive Sweeteners
There are two ‘families’ of nutritive sweeteners - sugars and sugar alcohols.

Sugars – this family of sweeteners is commonly found in (and extracted from) naturally sweet foods; as such they are also classed as natural sugars. Their names usually end with –ose; for example, Sucrose, Glucose and Fructose. Glucose is found in many fruits and along with fructose is responsible for their sweet taste. Sugars tend to be the highest calorie sweeteners and some of them have been implicated in causing or exacerbating health problems such as tooth decay, heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

Sugar Alcohols – this family of sweeteners have names that end in -ol; for example, Sorbitol and Xylitol. Sugar alcohols are classed as natural sugars - Xylitol, for example, is found in some fruits and vegetables as well as in the bark of the Birch tree. Most sugar alcohols have fewer calories than sugars because they only partially digest. This can have intestinal implications and common side-effects of over consumption include diarrhoea and flatulence. However, their low impact on blood sugar, reduced calories and the fact they do not cause tooth decay makes them a widely-used substitute for sugars.

Sugar alcohols are hydrogenated disccharides. I am not sure whether this classifies them as a carbohydrate or not. If you know, please comment!

An example of how these categories can blur is the sugar alcohol Erythritol. It does not get absorbed by the gut at all and therefore has no calories - yet as a sugar alcohol it is classed as a nutritive sweetener.
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners
For the most part, non-nutritive sweeteners are artificial sweeteners. Examples are Aspartame (Phenylalinine), Saccharin and Sucralose. The reasons why a non-nutritive sweetener might not provide calories include:

It does not digest, but passes through unchanged – for example Saccharin
It digests, but has no calorific value – for example sucralose
It does digest and does have calories, but is so sweet that the amounts required to sweeten a product are tiny – for example Neotmame, which is 10,000 times sweeter than sucrose.
Non-nutritive sweeteners are typically found in products marketed as sugar-free. In some cases (for example, Aspartame) there have been studies that suggest large quantities can be harmful when fed to rats.

One non-nutritive sweetener that is not artificial is Stevia. It's a non-nutritive sweetener because it is not metabolised by the body, but it is also a natural sweetener, since it can be found in the South American stevia plant.
The Definitive List
Bear in mind that the word you are searching for could occur in more than one place – for example, Honey contains fructose and glucose, so it is listed under ‘Also found in…’ for both Glucose and Fructose.

Sweeteners in bold have separate posts written about them which can be reached by expanding the row then clicking on the link inside.

Use your browser’s ‘Find’ function to locate the sweetener you are looking for. CTRL + F is the shortcut for this – alternatively, it can be found under Edit in the menu.

Chemical Name Alternative Names Also found in...
Acesulfame K Acesulfame Potassium, Sunett, Ace K, E950


Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener; also used in oral hygiene products
Notes It is 200 times sweeter than sucrose and is not metabolised so no effect on blood sugar. Does not cause damage to the teeth

Alitame Aclame


Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It has negligible calories because it's 2000 times sweeter than sucrose so hardly any is required to sweeten products.As a result, there is no real effect on blood sugar. Although from the same chemical family as Aspartame, it does not cause Phenylketonuria.

Aspartame Tropicana Slim, Equal, NutraSweet, Canderel, E951


Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes In a small number of people it causes Phenylketonuria, a condition that affects the brain. It has the same calories by weight as sucrose but in reality the calories it adds to foods are negligible because it's 180 times sweeter so hardly any is needed to sweeten a product. It does not damage teeth or significantly affect blood sugar.
More Spotlight on Aspartame

Cyclamate Assugrin, Sucaryl, Sugar Twin


Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It has no calories (and therefore no effect on blood sugar) because it is not metabolised. It is 30 times sweeter, by weight, than sucrose.

Erythritol Zerose Fruit

Type Natural, Sugar Alcohol, Nutritive
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It is three quarters as sweet as sucrose by weight but has almost no calories in spite of the fact that it does get absorbed. However, the absorption is mostly by the large intestine so unlike with some other sugar alcohols, there is not a laxative except in large doses. Does not affect the teeth. No significant effect on blood sugar

Fructose Fruit Sugar, Levulose, Laevulose Fruit, High Fructose Corn, Syrup (Isoglucose), High Fructose Glucose, Any Concentrated Fruit Juice, Any Fruit Syrup, Inverted Sugar (Reducing Sugar), Inverted Sugar Syrup / Trimoline, Sucrose Syrup, Golden Syrup, Honey, Agave Syrup, Carob Powder, Gur, Jaggery, Panella, Rapadura

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes Consuming fructose in the form of moderate amounts of fruit is considered safe. In more concentrated forms such as syrups, excessive consumption can cause health problems. Fructose does not raise blood sugar as much as other sugars like glucose and is therefore often recommended for people who need to control blood sugar. However, ironically there is evidence that regular consumption of large amounts of fructose can lead to insulin resistance, which is often the problem already faced by people who need to control blood sugar. It can only be metabolised by the liver, which develops fatty deposits when consumption is excessive. It has also been linked to heart disease and obesity by a number of studies. Like sucrose, fructose causes tooth decay.

Galactose Brain Sugar, Galactan Dairy Products, Sugar Beets

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses

Notes


Glucose Dextrose, Dextrin, Maltodextrin, Dextroglucose, Dextrose Monohdrate, Corn Syrup, Corn Syrup Solids, Corn Starch, Glucose Syrup, Isomaltose, Polycose Fruit, Agave Syrup, Inverted Sugar (Reducing Sugar), Inverted Sugar Syrup / Trimoline, Sucrose Syrup, Corn Sugar, Golden Syrup, Honey, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Carob Powder, Gur, High Fructose Glucose, Jaggery, Litesse, Panella, Rapadura

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses General food and drink sweetener and also used in oral hygiene products
Notes Consuming glucose in the form of moderate amounts of fruit is considered safe. Glucose causes sharp increases in blood sugar and is the benchmark for the glycemic index which measures the effect a food or drink has on blood sugar. In concentrated forms such as syrups, excessive consumption is likely to cause health issues and has been linked to heart disease and obesity as well as a number of other conditions. Like sucrose, glucose causes tooth decay.

Glycerol



Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses General food and drink sweetener; also used in pharmaceutical products
Notes It has the same calories as sugar but is not as sweet and has no effect on blood sugar. It also does not promote tooth decay

Inulin
Chicory, Chicory Root, Fruits/vegetables/Grains (in varying amounts)

Type Nutritive, Natural
Uses This is a family of substances, some of which are used as a sweetener - they are also used to replace fat or flour in some foods
Notes They are believed to have probiotic qualities and have little effect on blood sugar. Inulin is effectively a fiber, not a carbohydrate and has around a quarter of the calories of sucrose. It supposedly increases the absorbtion of calcium from other foods.

Isomalt Palatinose, Isomaltulose DiabetiSweet

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It has half the calories of sucrose by weight, does not promote tooth decay and does not raise blood sugar significantly. As with most alcohol sugars, it can have a laxative effect in large doses

Lactitol



Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses Mainly for sweetening food - often found in 'sugar-free' candies, cookies (biscuits), chocolate, and ice cream
Notes It has just over half the calories of sucrose by weight but is less than half as sweet. It supposedly has probiotic qualities and oes not cause tooth decay. It has a low effect on blood sugar but reportedly causes problems for lactose-intolerant people.

Lactose Milk Sugar Milk

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses Not a commonly used sweetener, although it is sometimes combined with other sweeteners or used in homeopathic remedies
Notes Lactose intolerance can affect some people, which leads to digetive and other problems when dairy foods are consumed

Maltitol Maltisorb, Maltisweet


Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses Used in 'sugar-free' hard candies/sweets, chewing gum, chocolates, baked goods and ice cream
Notes It is about three quarters as sweet as sucrose by weight and has half to three quarters the calories by weight. It has a reduced effect on blood sugar and does not damage teeth.

Maltose
Barley Malt Syrup, Brown Rice Syrup, High Maltose Corn Syrup, Corn sugar

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes


Mannitol Mannite, Manna Sugar Hydrogenated Glucose Syrup,
Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses General food and drink sweetener, especially minty products
Notes Like most sugar alcohols, it can have a laxative effect and does not raise blood sugar.

Neotame



Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It has negligible calories because it's 10,000 times sweeter than sucrose by weight so hardly any is required to sweeten products. Thus, there is no real effect on blood sugar. Although from the same chemical family as Aspartame, it does not cause Phenylketonuria.

Saccharin
Sweet'n' Low

Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses Used to sweeten drinks, candies, medicines and toothpaste
Notes It as no calories because it's not metabolised and so has no effect on blood sugar. It is 300 times sweeter than sucrose by weight.

Sorbitol Arlex Various Fruits and Berries, Hydrogenated Glucose Syrup, Hydrogenated Starch, Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate, Litesse

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses General food and drink sweetener, particularly diet foods. Also used in minty/ dental products and medicines
Notes It has about three quarters the calories of sucrose. Like most sugar alcohols, it can cause a laxative effect. It has a reduced action on blood sugar but there have been some concerns about excessive consumption by diabetics causing other health problems.

Stevia Stevia rebaudiana, Stevioside, Rebiana, sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, Truvia The leaft of the stevia rebaudiana plant.

Type Non-nutritive, Natural
Uses General food and drink sweetener, particularly diet foods.
Notes Stevia is typically up to 300 times the sweetness of sugar but is regarded as being effectively zero calorie.
More Article on Stevia at Felix's Kitchen

Sucralose Splenda, SucraPlus, E955


Type Non-nutritive, Artificial
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes It has zero calories, although some of the products that use it, such as Splenda, apparently contain some calories because the use bulking agents. It is 600 times sweeter than sucrose by weight and does not cause tooth decay

Sucrose Saccharose, Sucanat, Sugar, Granulated Sugar, Refined Sugar, Brown Sugar, Cane Juice, Evaporated Cane Juice, Evaporated Cane Sugar, Cane Sugar, Raw Cane Sugar, Demerera, Muscovado, Turbinado, Cane syrup, Beet syrup, Baker's Sugar, Bar Sugar, Barbados Sugar, Berry Sugar, Chinese Rock Sugar , Confectioners Sugar, Gemsugar, Polincillo, Rock sugar, Wasanbon Molasses, Maple syrup, Maple Sugar, Carob Powder, Date Sugar, Gur, Jaggery, Palm Sugar, Panella, Rapadura, Sucrose Syrup

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses General food and drink sweetener
Notes Although probably still the most commonly used food and drink sweetener, it is increasingly being replaced by other alternatives. It raises blood sugar rapidly and causes tooth decay. It has been implicated in a number of health issues. For example, there is evidence to suggest it has addictive qualities and that it may cause vitamin B defficiency. Excessive, long term consumption has been linked to heart disease and obesity

Tagatose Nutrilatose, Tagatesse Dairy Products (in small amounts)

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses General food and drink sweetener and also used to add creaminess to foods
Notes It has less than half the calories of sucrose (due to partial absorbstion in the gut) but is almost as sweet by weight. It does not have a significant effect on blood sugar and is not damaging to teeth. It apparently has probiotic effects.

Trehalose Mycose Various Plants and Animals (in small amounts)

Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar
Uses Used in food and cosmetics
Notes It is half as sweet as sucrose by weight, but contains the same number of calories by weight. It is also an antioxidant and has only a small effect on blood sugar.

Xylitol Birch Sugar


Type Nutritive, Natural, Sugar Alcohol
Uses Sweetening minty products and dental products
Notes It has less than half the calories of sucrose and has no effect on blood sugar
More Spotlight on Xylitol

Notes on the How the List was Compiled
The first column contains the chemical names for sweeteners.

The Alternative Names column contains either nicknames for that sweetener or substances that are mostly made up of that sweetener and therefore amount to the same thing.
The Also Found in column includes foods, drinks, plants or animals where there are significant amounts of the sweetener to be found – except in some cases, where the amounts are small this is indicated in brackets.
If there is missing information this is because I could not find it - for example, the effects on teeth is mentioned for some sweeteners but not others.
Introduction
Sugar the Nickname vs. Sugar the General Term
Artificial vs. Natural
Nutritive vs. Non-nutritive Sweeteners
The Definitive List
Notes on the How the List was Compiled
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Sugar, Sugars and Sweeteners - Spotlight on Xylitol
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Posts: 1544
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 1:36 pm

PostMon Jul 19, 2010 10:22 am » by Truthseeker


Artificial Sweeteners
Dr. Larry W. McDaniel and Jamie Welter ask the following questions related to artificial sweeteners.

Do sweeteners have the ability to prevent weight loss?
May the use of artificial sweeteners produce possible side effects?
What are some of the differences between artificial sweeteners?
Artificial sweeteners provide lower caloric intake than sugar in various types of foods and fluids. However, there has been controversy surrounding these too- good-to-be-true sweeteners. "The idea of a genuinely toothsome sensation that isn't "paid for" in calories and weight gain seems too much like the proverbial free lunch" [9]. Artificial sweeteners have been found to increase body weight when compared to high-sucrose foods. The rationale behind this observation was that sweeteners may actually increase cravings for foods that contain real sugar. Questions have been raised related to how these artificial sweeteners affect the brain to produce the association between sweetness and the urge to increase cravings for sweet calories. Other research trials have shown that diets with artificial sweeteners may assist subjects in the process of losing weight. [9]


Do artificial sweeteners have the ability to prevent weight loss?
Obesity has continued to rise in the age of artificial sweeteners; some studies found short-term increases in sugar craving to sweeteners, while others found no connection. People who use artificial sweeteners tend to be heavier than those who do not renounce sugar, but this may occur because of the greater number of overweight people who consume sugar substitutes to control their weight. Normally the brain identifies sweetness with calories, which is not achieved with artificial sweeteners. For example, when a group of rats drank artificially sweetened fluid the rats began to miss the sweetness calorie connection. The rats consumed more of a sugary and fattening snack than those rats who had been enjoying sweet high calorie drinks. Research suggests that artificial sweeteners may cause the same effect on people, however, that possibility has not been strongly supported.

A study consisted of a group of overweight people who drank beverages sweetened with sugar and a second group of overweight people that drank beverages with a sugar substitute. Both groups consumed the same quantity of liquid. Those who drank the sugar liquid gained 3.5 pounds versus a two-pound weight loss for those who drank the artificially sweetened beverages. Sweeteners may not cause the same results on people because sugar substitutes tend to be consumed by ingesting low or no calorie drinks accompanied with high calorie meals. This combination may satisfy the sugar calorie connection in their brains.

David Levitsky added, "Unquestionably, artificial sweeteners work. In experimental studies, when calories were actually measured by what people ate with and without sweeteners, total caloric intake goes down with sweeteners" [9]. But Levitsky cautioned that sweeteners need to be substituted for higher calorie foods and drinks to make a difference, as opposed to simply adding them on to the calories that have been consumed. If used properly, sweeteners may be useful in weight management. Research have been performed that included two overweight groups that agreed to supplement their meals with sucrose or artificial sweeteners for 10 weeks. Those with sucrose gained 1.5 kg; the group who consumed artificial sweeteners lost 1.0 kg. These findings contradicted the idea that the consumption of artificial sweetener leads to over consumption of carbohydrate foods, leading to weight gain. Additional studies with similar results have been published. [9]

May the use of artificial sweeteners produce possible side effects?
In reference to the safety aspects related to the consumption of artificial sweeteners aspartame was found to be multi-potent carcinogenic agent when feed to rats. These studies confirmed that aspartame was a carcinogenic agent. Researchers demonstrated that carcinogenic effects are increased when there is life-span exposure to aspartame beginning during fetal life.

A case study on aspartame found that it has the potential to trigger migraine headaches. The study found that in two patients the acute agent containing aspartame worsened rather than relieved their migraines. Another case study, by Dr's. Bigal and Krymchantowski, found that Splenda, containing sucralose, may also induce migraines. [1]

The list of artificial sweeteners to be avoided consisted of Sucralose, Acesulfame-K, Aspartame, Alitame, and Cyclamate. Two sweeteners that are the most used and popular were Sucralose and Aspartame. Sucralose is known as SPLENDA. SPLENDA has been acknowledged for its inability to be metabolized by the body. Since it is not digested, Splenda does not increase calories, raise blood sugar, or leave an aftertaste. Testing of sucralose has revealed organ, genetic, and reproductive damage. Other side effects may entail shrinkage of the thymus gland, swelling of the liver and kidneys, and initiate calcification of the kidney; but the FDA determined that it does not increase cancer risk in humans. [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Aspartame, known as NutraSweet and Equal, is intensely sweet and is digested like protein, but the calories are negligible since only a small amount is needed due to its intensely sweet taste. Aspartame has no aftertaste. Aspartame has been identified as a dangerous chemical food additive. The use of this sweetener during pregnancy and by children has been contraindicated. Menthanol, part of aspartame's blueprint, is a known carcinogen that causes retinal damage in the eye, interferes with DNA replication, and causes birth defects. One of the most deadly reactions to aspartame is by phenylketonurics (PKU). Toxic levels of this substance (PKU) in the blood stream may result in mental retardation. Scientists believe aspartame alters brain function and prompts behaviour changes in humans. The over consumption of PKU in one's diet may cause seizures, elevated blood plasma, and negative effects during pregnancy, increased PMS symptoms, insomnia, and severe mood swings. [3]


What are some of the differences between varieties of artificial sweeteners?
Many people assume that all artificial sweeteners are similar and have the same properties. A section of this study was prepared to discuss those differences. Not all artificial sweeteners are produced using the same ingredients. Some sweeteners are composed of a mixture of unnatural chemicals that the body has difficulty processing. Basically, these chemicals accumulate in vital organs, pollute bloodstream, or cause mutations of human cells. One method to determine which sugar packet may be safely consumed is to look at the colour of the paper container. When shopping think of Splenda, the yellow packet, as caution. The blue packet, Equal, makes you feel blue. Sweet'N'Low®, or generic saccharin, the pink packet: you're in the pink! Sweet'N'Low® has been the most recommend sweetener for human use. [6] Alternatives to consider include safe natural sweeteners such as stevia, honey, sorghum, barley malt, and molasses

Conclusion
Studies were uncertain as to whether artificial sweeteners were contributors to weight gain. However, research findings have indicated that diet drinks may cause some individuals to overeat. Water has been a great substitute for sweetened or artificial sweeteners. When deciding which sweeteners to be consumed use Sweet'N'Low®, or generic saccharin. Avoid or reduce the consumption of Aspartame, Nutra-Sweet, and Equal.

Health and safety studies indicate that it is important to pay attention to the amount of artificial sweeteners an individual consumes in their diet daily. An additional consideration would be the potential for the development of migraine head aches or cancer in years to come. Be cautious of the effects that these substances may have on your body.

The American Dietetic Association (ADA) published a comprehensive report on sugar and artificial sweeteners affirming that artificial sweeteners are safe when used in the amounts specified by the FDA. One does not have to eliminate artificial sweeteners from your diet, but it is important to be cautious when using sweeteners. These products should be used in moderation. [3][4]

Sweet choices
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five low-calorie sweeteners for use in a variety of foods. The FDA has established an "acceptable daily intake" (ADI) for each sweetener. This is the maximum amount considered safe to consume each day over a lifetime. ADIs are intended to be about 100 times less than the smallest amount that might cause health concerns.

Artificial sweetener ADI* Estimated ADI equivalent** OK for Cooking?
Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) 50 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg of body weight) 18 to 19 cans of diet cola No
Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, SugarTwin) 5 mg per kg 9 to 12 packets of sweetener Yes
Acesulfame K (Sunett, Sweet One) 15 mg per kg 30 to 32 cans of diet lemon-lime soda*** Yes
Sucralose (Splenda) 5 mg per kg 6 cans of diet cola*** Yes
Neotame 18 mg per day No consumer products available yet in the USA Yes

*FDA-established acceptable daily intake (ADI) limit per kilogram (2.2 pounds) of body weight
**Product-consumption equivalent for a 150-pound person
***These products usually contain more than one type of sweetener

References
Bigal,M.E.& Krymchantowski,A.V. (September 2007). Should You Sour on Aspartame? Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, 25(7), 4-5.
Hirsch, A. R. (March 2007). Migraine Triggered by Sucralose - A Case Report. Headache: The Journal of Head & Face Pain, 47(3), 447.
Hull, J. (March 2005). The Dangers of Artificial Sweeteners. Total Health, 27(1), 30-32.
Newman, L. C. & Lipton, R. B. (October 2001). Migraine MLT-Down: An Unusual Presentation of Migraine in Patients With Aspartame-Triggered Headaches. Headache: The Journal of Head & Face Pain, 41(9), 899-901.
Rebhahn, P. (April 2001). Dangerous Diet Drinks. Psychology Today, 34(2), 20-25.
Rubin, K. (May 2003). Where We Stand Today: Artificial Sweeteners. FoodService Director, 16(5), 48.
Soffritti, M., Belpoggi, F., et al. (September 2007). Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning during Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats. Environmental Health Perspectives, 115(9), 1293-1297.
St-Onge, M. & Heymsfield, S. B. (June 2003). Usefulness of Artificial Sweeteners for Body Weight Control. Nutrition Reviews, 61(6), 219-221.
Szalavitz, M. (September 2006). The Sweetener Standoff. Psychology Today, 39(5), 60.
About the Authors
Dr. Larry McDaniel is an associate professor and advisor for the Exercise Science program at Dakota State University, Madison SD USA. He is a former All - American in football and Hall of Fame athlete & coach. Jamie Welter is a student in Exercise Science at Dakota State University.

Article Reference
Dr. McDaniel L. et al (2008), "Artificial Sweeteners", BrianMac Sports Coach: www.brianmac.co.uk/articles/article028.htm
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PostMon Jul 19, 2010 3:03 pm » by Truthseeker


you are what you eat and drink .
Article
Carbonated Drinks: Learn the Truth!
Front page / Science / Health
15.07.2010 Source: Pravda.Ru


Pages: 1

A study by a Brazilian Professor from Matto Grosso Federal University has revealed the shocking truth about the effects of having a can of a carbonated drink. Learn what happens inside your body in the sixty minutes after you glug down your refreshing sizzling drink…and think carefully!






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After just ten minutes, 10 teaspoons of sugar hit your body, 100% of the daily recommended
dose. You do not immediately vomit from the overwhelming sweetness because the
Phosphoric acid in the drink cuts the taste.


After twenty minutes, t he level of sugar in your blood erupts, forcing a rush of insulin. The liver responds by turning all the sugar it receives into fat.

After forty minutes, the caffeine absorption is complete. Your pupils dilate, blood pressure
r ises, the liver responds by pumping more sugar into your bloodstream. Adenosine receptors in the brain are now blocked, preventing drowsiness and giving you an energy rush.

After 45, the body increases dopamine production stimulating the pleasure centers. This same process takes place with the consumption of heroin, for example.

50 minutes. The phosphoric acid binds calcium, magnesium and zinc in the intestine,
increasing the metabolism. High doses of sugar and artificial sweeteners also increase
Calcium excretion in the urine, or in other words, you are urinating your bones away, one of
the causes of Osteoporosis.

60 minutes: One hour after consuming. The caffeine's diuretic properties come into play. You urinate. Now it is guaranteed that will be putting out of your system calcium, magnesium and zinc, which your bones need. As time goes on, you'll experience a sugar crash. You'll be cranky. You will already have excreted everything that was in the drink, but also essential properties which your body needs.

Then you’ll reach for another one. No wonder President Vargas banned Cola from Brazil!

Study by Prof. Dr. Carlos Alexandre Fett

“Quando você acaba de beber um refrigerante”

When you have just consumed a carbonated drink

School of Physical Education UFMT

Master of Nutrition UFMT
Laboratory of Physical Fitness and Metabolism - 3615 8836
Consultancy on Human Performance and Aesthetics


Translation: Fátima CHANTRE

Portuguese version

PRAVDA.Ru



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