In northern Mali, music silenced as Islamists drive out arti

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 7635
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:14 am

PostFri Dec 07, 2012 5:23 pm » by 99socks


In northern Mali, music silenced as Islamists drive out artists

BAMAKO, Mali — Khaira Arby, one of Africa’s most celebrated musicians, has performed all over the world, but there is one place she cannot visit: her native city of Timbuktu, a place steeped in history and culture but now ruled by religious extremists.

One day, they broke into Arby’s house and destroyed her instruments. Her voice was a threat to Islam, they said, even though one of her most popular songs praised Allah.

“They told my neighbors that if they ever caught me, they would cut my tongue out,” said Arby, sadness etched on her broad face.

Northern Mali, one of the richest reservoirs of music on the continent, is now an artistic wasteland. Hundreds of musicians have fled south to Bamako, the capital, and to other towns and neighboring countries, driven out by hard-liners who have decreed any form of music — save for the tunes set to Koranic verses — as being against their religion.

The exiles describe a shattering of their culture, in which playing music brings lashes with whips, even prison time, and MP3 and cassette players are seized and destroyed.

“We can no longer live like we used to live,” lamented Aminata Wassidie Traore, 36, a singer who fled her village of Dire, near Timbuktu. “The Islamists do not want anyone to sing anymore.”

In Malian society, music anchors every ceremony, from births and circumcisions to weddings and prayers for rains. Village bards known as griots sang traditional songs and poems of the desert, passing down centuries-old tales of empires, heroes and battles, as well as their community’s history. In this manner, memories were preserved from generation to generation, along with ancient African traditions and ways of life.

In current times, lyrics serve as a source of inspiration and learning, a way to pass down morals and values to youths. They have also been used to expose corruption and human rights abuses, and have helped eradicate stigmas and given a voice to the poor.

“In northern Mali, music is like oxygen,” said [BANNED] Salah, one of northern Mali’s most-respected musicians. “Now, we cannot breathe.”

In March, amid a military coup that left the government in disarray, Tuareg rebels who once fought for Libyan autocrat Moammar Gaddafi joined forces with secessionists and Islamists linked to al-Qaeda. They swept through northern Mali, seizing major towns within weeks and effectively splitting this impoverished nation into two. Soon afterward, the Islamists and al-Qaeda militants took control.

They have installed an ultraconservative brand of Islamic law in this moderate Muslim country, reminiscent of Afghanistan’s Taliban and Somalia’s al-Shabab movements. Now, women must wear head-to-toe garments. Smoking, alcohol, videos and any suggestions of Western culture are banned. The new decrees are enforced by public amputations, whippings and executions, prompting more than 400,000 people to flee. The extremists also destroyed tombs and other cultural treasures, saying they were against Islamic principles.

The death of music was inevitable. It is, perhaps, Mali’s strongest link to the West. Musicians such as the late guitarist Ali Farka Toure, the Tuareg-Berber band Tinariwen and singers such as Salif Keita exported their music to the United States and Europe. They often collaborated with Western musicians.

Since 2001, Western artists such as Robert Plant have performed at the Festival of the Desert, outside Timbuktu, transforming Mali into an international artistic and tourist destination. In January, U2 frontman Bono performed with Tinariwen. This February, though, the festival will be held in neighboring Burkina Faso.

The international recognition helped spark a new generation of young artists in the north. Some fused songs in their native Songhai and Tamashek languages with Arabic and French. Others melded traditional rhythms of the desert with rap, hip-hop, reggae, funk and blues. Bands weaved traditional Malian lute and fiddles with electric guitars.

In recent times, the lyrics have addressed social and political issues. In “Waidio,” Arby sings about the plight of women trapped by war. She has also sung about Fulani cattle herders and the hard labor endured by salt miners.

‘Music is against Islam’

Today, in the city of Gao, 39-year-old singer Bintu Aljuma Yatare no longer listens to music on her phone. The Islamists will confiscate it, she said. Five musicians in her band have fled to neighboring Niger; two others are in Bamako. She cannot leave because she has to take care of her aging parents.

Every evening, she risks being sent to prison: She shuts the windows and doors of her house and sings in her native Songhai language. “Sometimes I lie in my bed and hum my songs softly,” she said. “The only way for me to survive this nightmare is through music.”

The other day, she wrote a song about the drivers who take people out of northern Mali to safer pastures.

For reggae musician Alwakilo Toure, his home in Gao was not a sanctuary. He was strumming his guitar when six armed militants barged into his compound. With guns pointed at his head, one Islamist grabbed the guitar and smashed it to bits with his foot. “The guitar was my life,” Toure recalled. “I had nothing else to do.”

Two weeks later, he fled to Bamako.

In a telephone interview, one of the Islamists’ top commanders declared that his fighters would continue to target musicians.

“Music is against Islam,” said Oumar Ould Hamaha, the military leader of the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, one of the three extremist groups controlling the north. “Instead of singing, why don’t they read the Koran? Why don’t they subject themselves to God and pray? We are not only against the musicians in Mali. We are in a struggle against all the musicians of the world.”

Artists without a home

In a cramped apartment in Bamako, about a dozen young artists were recording a song, a fusion of rap and traditional melodies. In one corner, there was a microphone and a computer to mix the tracks. Next to that was a synthesizer.

All the artists were from northern Mali, and none were playing with their own instruments because they had either been burned or shattered by the Islamists. The group included Toure, who was coaching a singer.

But their escape to Bamako is bittersweet.

It has been difficult for the musicians to earn money in the capital. They sing in the lan­guages of the north, but most people in Bamako speak only the southern Bambara language.

“In Bamako, people don’t understand what we sing,” Toure said. “It really hurts us that we can’t perform. Most of us don’t have jobs. Many of us now rely on our relatives for money.”

But even in exile, they have found a way to take a stand against the Islamists.

“We feel like soldiers,” said Kiss Diouara, a 24-year-old rapper. “This is our way to fight our war.”

A few minutes later, he played his group’s most recent creation. The video included a collage of news clips and photos of Islamists destroying ancient mosques and asserting their power. In the video, Diourra raps:

Free the North

We want peace in our land

We want to go back to our homes

Arby understands. For the past eight months, she has lived out of a suitcase.

Arby knows she could easily travel outside Mali for work. Her 2010 album, “Timbuktu Tarab,” was widely acclaimed in the West. She had opportunities to settle in the United States, she said.

But Mali is where she is most inspired, specifically in Timbuktu, she said.

“When I think of Timbuktu, I am lost,” said Arby, wiping a sudden tear that trickled down her cheek. “When I dream of Timbuktu, I wake up. When I think of Timbuktu when I am speaking, I stop speaking. My heart is broken. Timbuktu is everything to me.”


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/in-northern-mali-music-silenced-as-islamists-drive-out-artists/2012/11/30/110ea016-300c-11e2-af17-67abba0676e2_story.html




Upload to Disclose.tv




Upload to Disclose.tv



Ahhhhh!!!!! This song is one of the many I have been looking for since 1996.... :sunny:


Upload to Disclose.tv

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/obamas-doj-silent-as-new-black-panthers-leader-incites-violence-in-ferguson_082014








I can't speak about how much of the Constitution is in effect anymore... But thank God we still somewhat resemble a Republic and not a democracy!


Image

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 7600
Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 10:34 pm

PostFri Dec 07, 2012 9:49 pm » by Flecktarn


muslim killjoys ,they need to get out of the stone age ,,even Mohammed loves drum and bass
ImageImage

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 7635
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:14 am

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 1:08 am » by 99socks


99socks wrote:


Upload to Disclose.tv







It's a metaphor, I swear... I always felt he was on to something... Like Cohen's "Future".....



Tu Vas Me Manquer

By Salif Keita

Translated by Coumba Makalou



Y kana la oh la

Don't believe in that


Y kana la oh la

Don't believe in that



Tu m'as manquer mon amour (x2)

I missed you my love




Ne ni cherie willila kan be tama yala

Me and love got up to go travel


En sera Ouagadougou

We got to Ouagadougou


Sou kora

The sun went down

An dou bora

So we went out

Kan be ta sen na yala

So we could take a walk



An sera yen

We got there

Don ke yoro la

To the nightclub

An sera yen

We got there

Do ye kanou ye

Someone saw my love

Ka yaraba ba la

And fell for her

Ne ko kanou ma

I told my love

I kana son

Don't accept

Y kana la la

Don't believe it



Y kana la oh la

Don't believe that

Y kana la oh la

Don't believe that



Y kana da mola

Don't believe people today

Y kana da be mogo la

Don't believe what they say



Ne ni kanou willila kan be tama

Me and my love got up to travel

En sera Senegal

We got to Senegal

En sera Dakar

We got to Dakar

Ba da la

In front of the ocean

Dans la capitale

In the capital

Do ye kanou ye

Someone saw my love

A le ba tigui

Someone with power

Do ko kanou ma

Someone told my love

En be dab ala

Let's go to near the water

Doumin nouman be da la

There's good food to eat there

Ne ko kanou ma

I told my love

E kana son

Don't accept it

Y kana la la

Don't believe what they say



Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for that

Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for that

Y kana da mola

Don't fall for those people

Y kana da be mogo la

Don't fall for that kind of person



Ne ni kanou willila

Me and my love got to travel

En sera Franci

We got to France

En sera Paris

We got to Paris

Ba da la

We got in front of the water

Dans la metropole

In the metropolis

Do ye kanou ye

Someone told my love

Nafola ba tigui

Someone with alot of money

Do ko kanou ma

Someone told my love

Be son wari la

I'll give you lots of money

Be son sanu la

I'll give you lots of gold

Ne ko kanou ma

I told my love

Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for that



Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for those things

Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for those things

Y kana da mola

Don't fall for those kind of people

Y kana da be mogo la

Don't fall for those people

Tu m'as manquer mon amour

I missed you my love



Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for those things

Y kana la oh la

Don't fall for it

Y kan son

Don't accept it

Tu m'as manquer amour

I missed you my love

Y kana la la

Don't believe those things

Tu m'as manquer amour

I missed you my love

Y kana son

Don't accept that

Tu m'as manquer amour

I missed you my love

Y kana la la

Don't believe it


http://www.myspace.com/salifkeitamusic/blog/177014698
http://www.thedailysheeple.com/obamas-doj-silent-as-new-black-panthers-leader-incites-violence-in-ferguson_082014








I can't speak about how much of the Constitution is in effect anymore... But thank God we still somewhat resemble a Republic and not a democracy!


Image

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2382
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 9:16 am

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 9:16 am » by mediasorcery


wow, im realling "warming" to this extreme mentality of these utter backwards fukarse mothers, one word=bullies and stand ova fuks,


we know theyre not all like this, but the ones who are end up dominating the ones who are not thru intimidation and violence/threats, thats why they are a big fokin worry i now believe.
the story of life is quicker than the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello and goodbye, until we meet again my friend.

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 918
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 11:10 am » by Edgar 2.0


Nice guy, that Ould Hamaha :

Image

Mali's Islamist rebel group Ansar Dine, which jointly controls the country's north, said it was not interested in proclaiming an independent state but only in the implementation of sharia.



http://www.demotix.com/news/1291383/mali-islamists-want-sharia-not-independence/all-media

Charismatic Oumar Ould Hamaha speaks French perfectly. He himself said to have received his BA in 1984 in Timbuktu. His beard, dyed with henna, got him the nickname "the red beard"

He his men are alegedly called "Hakka", because of the skillful use of Kalashnikov AK-47.

Oumar Ould Hamaha, made ​​contact with the Algerian Mokhtar Belmokhtar, one of the main brains of Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, in the 2000s .
His oral fluency and radicalism of his statements have recently propelled him to the head of the Islamist groups who run Azawad today, and impose a form of religious terror there .



http://www.malijet.com/actualte_dans_les_regions_du_mali/rebellion_au_nord_du_mali/53241-qui-est-%C2%AB-le-barbu-rouge-%C2%BB-du-sahel%3F.html
Image

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4959
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:45 pm

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 12:17 pm » by Phaeton


Mali: US Africa Command (AFRICOM) Prepares for Another “Humanitarian” Military Intervention?


By Patrick Henningsen
Global Research, October 12, 2012
21st Century Wire


Obama has been carrying the AFRICOM ball down the field after the directive was launched under George W. Bush in 2007. Washington DC, led by African Secretary, Jonnie Carson, speaks to its public at a level deserving of an uninformed, Helen Keller-esque populace, claiming that Somalia was ‘a big success’ because Washington spooks spent $500 million backing an “African Proxy Force” that allegedly “drove out al Qaida” in that country. And it is no coincidence that massive untapped oil reserves in the Puntland region in northeastern Somalia were recently announced in early 2012.

Image

Just as Washington’s corporate interests are hidden behind ‘humanitarian interventions’, the UK Prime Minister David Cameron will run the same facade. Last February he hosted an international conference on Somalia, where he pledged more aid, financial help and measures “to fight terrorism” in Somalia. Cameron does not tell you that those so-called terrorist forces are funded and supported, and ultimately steered – by the western intelligence agencies – whereby they control all sides of the local conflict. Note they are using the same recycled narrative in Mali now, fighting “Islamic extremists” there – promoting freedom and democracy in the region etc.

Mali’s vast potential wealth lies in mining, agricultural commodities, and oil - and these proven reserves are not currently exploited. Interestingly enough, Ghana and Mali together account for 5.8% of total world gold production. These assets are the true focus of US and UK interests in Africa – not humanitarian concerns.

Image

The 2012 Somalia Oil Conference was a mere pre-negotiation meeting to discuss how oil assets would be divided up between the US, UK and other remaining energy players – demonstrating what is the real agenda with AFRICOM. Obama supporters will naturally give this President a free pass on Africa because he is of part African descent, not realizing that he is running the exact same agenda as his Republican predecessor. What corporate agents like Jonnie Carson does not tell electorate plebs is that the US has recently infested itself in Libya, Uganda, Somalia, North Sudan and elsewhere, and now has its eyes set on Mali. The initial goal of US domination of Africa is outlined in the AFRICOM documents, and names the eviction of China from the continent as task number one.

Africa Pulse spells it out: “Strong economic growth in the past decade among African countries rich in oil and minerals has failed to make a significant dent on their poverty levels, according to a World Bank report.”

In other words, the Anglo-American imperialists would like to eliminate competition for Africa’s bountiful resources, continuing a centuries-old policy of raping the Dark Continent and leaving nothing but perpetual internal strife and poverty behind.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/applying-the-somalia-model-us-africa-command-africom-prepares-for-humanitarianmilitary-intervention-in-mali/5308015
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


Upload to Disclose.tv


Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4959
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:45 pm

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 12:18 pm » by Phaeton


Mali, Al Qaeda, and the US Neo-Colonial Agenda


By Eric Draitser
Global Research, July 16, 2012
16 July 2012


Recent developments in Mali illustrate both the way in which the Unites States and its Western allies directly project military and political power, as well as the role of terrorism as a necessary pretext for imperialist, neo-colonial domination. Beginning with the establishment of AFRICOM (US Africa Command) in 2007, incorporating the war in Libya and the military coup d’etat in Mali, and up to today’s consolidation of power by Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), it has become clear that the United States has managed to successfully destabilize West Africa and achieve many of its long-term strategic objectives in the region.
While the Western media portrays the situation in West Africa as an “unintended consequence” of the imperialist aggression against Libya, the incontrovertible fact that the United States has, for years, attempted to expand its control of the region, has been made all the more apparent by the current instability and the “decisive action” that it necessitates. The spread of AQIM, which has now consolidated control over a vast swath of land in the Sahel region, rather conveniently provides the US with the crucial cover it needs to expand its military presence.

Recent Developments
Since the fall of the Gaddafi regime in Libya, Mali has been embroiled in a fierce civil war that has torn the country apart. The Tuareg fighters, who had fought on the side of Gaddafi and the Green Resistance, began to return home armed, battle-hardened, and bearing a grudge. This was, understandably, a recipe for war in Mali where the central government was seen as little more than a US puppet regime,touting democracy as it bowed to US military and corporate interests. The rebels began waging war against Bamako in hopes of creating their own independent state of Azawad in Northern Mali, a goal which has been stifled since Mali gained its own independence in 1960.
As the war continued to intensify, the Malian military became increasingly frustrated with what they perceived to be a lack of support from the civilian government. This anger and resentment was then channeled by a small clique within the Malian officer corps into a coup d’etat to overthrow the government in Bamako. The coup was lead by Captain Amadou Sanogo, a US-trained mid-level officer, heading an assortment of lower-level military officers who claimed to be patriots seeking to quell the rebellion in the North. In reality, the move was a cynically designed ploy by Sanogo and his US sponsors to destabilize Mali. As anticipated, the overthrow plunged the country into political turmoil, and with no legitimate government in the capital, opened the door to a much more dangerous enemy in the North.

Enter: Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb
In the midst of the fighting between the Touré government and the Tuareg forces, there emerged a new threat in the North, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). This offshoot of Al Qaeda, once seen as a marginal threat with little to no chance of establishing a significant presence in the region, began to make its presence felt through an alliance with the rebels. Really no more than a marriage of convenience, the two forces fought side by side to defeat the weak Malian military which, despite years of training and advanced equipment from the United States, was unable to inflict any significant damage on the rebels or terrorist fighters. However, once it became clear that the North was going to be “freed” from the control of the government and Malian military, the divide between rebels and AQ fighters became evident.
Eyewitness accounts from Mali describe the AQIM fighters as having arrived in Land Cruisers with advanced weapons and communications equipment, ostensibly acquired through defeating the Malian and other military forces in the region. This highly organized and well-funded contingent emerged in Mali after having been roundly defeated by the military and other government forces in Algeria, where the group originated. This fact should not be lost on keen observers who note that, due to their failure to destabilize that oil-rich country in the interests of Western imperialists, AQIM migrated to Mali where they successfully hijacked the civil war there and turned it into another staging ground for terror and destabilization, like its corollary in Libya.

AQIM, US-AFRICOM, and the Destabilization of the Sahel
As with other Al Qaeda offshoots, AQIM’s history is directly related to that of the US intelligence and military presence in the Sahel. The US military’s Africa Command (AFRICOM) was established by the Bush Administration in 2007 in order to, in their words, “defend US national security interests by strengthening the defense capabilities of African States…and defeat transnational threats.” However, within months of the establishment of AFRICOM, the Algerian group known as the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (SGPC) was rebranded AQIM and immediately became a much more serious threat with international capabilities, something it had never had before that point.
One can only wonder how, within the span of a few short months, as US military and intelligence presence is dramatically increased, such a group can immediately spring up. It would be logical to assume that the two events are not merely coincidence. Rather, AFRICOM, in order to legitimize its own presence in the region needed an enemy. So, it took an obscure terror organization, gave them the Al Qaeda banner, and thereby created the conditions for a military presence. AFRICOM was then able to install so-called “advisers” in the militaries of the region, ostensibly to combat the threat posed by this new organization while, in truth, creating dependence of those militaries on the United States. These developments were part of the broader mission known as the Trans-Sahara Counter-Terrorism Partnershipwhich enabled the United States to penetrate the militaries of the entire region and thereby make them into clients or proxies of the US military. It is precisely this dependence which was so evident in the routing of the Malian military at the hands of the rebels and AQIM.
With the defeat of the Malian forces and the de facto establishment of the state of Azawad, AQIM now controls a large portion of the Sahel/West Africa region, allowing it to menace neighboring states and continue to legitimize the AFRICOM presence. This military presence, though, is not entirely visible. In fact, it is now confirmed that US commandos and other Special Forces have been actively engaged in Mali since before the coup in late March. According to mainstream media and military spokespeople, the commandos were purely communications experts providing technical assistance to the military. While this is undoubtedly true to a certain extent, the news indicates a much broader engagement in the country, one that likely includes all manner of covert operations engaging with terrorists, rebels, and the military forces. Essentially then, the situation in Mali, and the wider region, has to be understood as being directly and cynically manipulated by the United States.

US Objectives
The US imperialist ruling class has a multitude of reasons for their desire to destabilize the Sahel and Africa more broadly. First and foremost is the desire to block the continued Chinese economic penetration of the continent. It is no secret that China has become, by far, the most significant investor in Africa. With the mutually beneficial arrangements wherein China engages in large-scale economic development while receiving, in return, access to raw materials, the Chinese have entrenched themselves in many African nations. Because of this, the United States must find ways to slow down or stop altogether these relations by any means necessary.
Secondly, the US seeks to prevent the independent economic development of Africa. Washington and Wall St. cannot bear to watch their former servants establish themselves outside of US dollar hegemony. As the US, Europe, and much of the world have slipped into a global depression, much of Africa has remained economically stable. Naturally, the 1% cannot allow this, and so, they must seek to re-impose their dominance utilizing the usual assortment of weapons: terrorism, military coups, and blackmail. In so doing, Africa is once again under the thumb of Western financiers.
Lastly, the US must do whatever it takes to continue to justify its military presence on the continent. Despite public revulsion throughout Africa to the idea of AFRICOM, Washington has managed to incorporate it into many of the militaries on the continent. In so doing, the US both legitimizes its own expenditures and is able to enforce the agenda of Wall St. and the international financier class. Moreover, this provides the muscle behind US puppet regimes such as those in Ethiopia, Rwanda, Uganda, and elsewhere – governments that act as the brutal enforcers of US policy, always bowing to the dictates of their patrons in Washington.

In many ways, Mali has become a second Libya – a fractured nation that has been reduced to chaos with much of the population living under the rule of terrorists and extremists. Like Libya, Mali is undoubtedly being transformed into a sanctuary for international terror campaigns that have, as their mission, nothing less than the total destruction of modern Africa.

Whether conscious or unconscious, these forces, which seek to impose their will on the people of Africa, work in the service of the United States. As with Libya, Somalia, Nigeria, and countless other nations, the US imperialists, using the brutal weapon of terrorism, have reduced Mali to a failed state in order to consolidate their own domination and further their neo-colonial agenda.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/mali-al-qaeda-and-the-us-neo-colonial-agenda/31918
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


Upload to Disclose.tv


Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4959
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:45 pm

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 12:26 pm » by Phaeton


When are we going to start realizing that almost all these extremist elements are used by our own ruling bodies to further its goals geo- politically?

Wake the F*CK up.

These extremists are just as ignorant and just as hoodwinked as the lionpart of the Western populace is.

Their movie is anti- Western, our movie is anti- Islamic.

We watch our movie with popcorn and 'diet' coke, they watch theirs with bullets flying and general poverty abound.

Thats the only difference.
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


Upload to Disclose.tv


Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2382
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 9:16 am

PostSat Dec 08, 2012 2:15 pm » by mediasorcery


its b husseins/sotero/whatever his nameis strategy to implement sharia,[thats what they want,hilary too] hes not african i dont believe, hes egyptian i reckon,
could u blame the earth for wanting to cleanse all the violent deceptive filth?
the story of life is quicker than the blink of an eye, the story of love is hello and goodbye, until we meet again my friend.



  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook