ISON COVER UP/May not be a Comet.

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:03 pm

PostFri Aug 23, 2013 1:02 am » by Mumin


so... nobody else thinks that what is shown in that GIF that I uploaded is extremely weird?

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:03 pm

PostFri Aug 23, 2013 3:19 pm » by Mumin


I've made one with faster transitions between the pictures, using 4 of the pictures taken on July 16th.

http://i.imgur.com/uqtSFQq.gif

Writer
User avatar
Posts: 63
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 2:23 am

PostFri Aug 23, 2013 3:48 pm » by Reposoul


Mumin wrote:I've made one with faster transitions between the pictures, using 4 of the pictures taken on July 16th.

http://i.imgur.com/uqtSFQq.gif


Looks like its speeding up by the look of them pictures
ImageImage

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2386
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 1:09 pm

PostFri Aug 23, 2013 3:59 pm » by Tjahzi


*WillEase* wrote:Hate to kill your thread, but if you go to the source everything is explained...
http://heritage.stsci.edu/2013/24/original.html


I'm not entirely convinced by that link.

Mumin wrote:I've made one with faster transitions between the pictures, using 4 of the pictures taken on July 16th.

http://i.imgur.com/uqtSFQq.gif


Very odd gif :cheers:
Image

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:03 pm

PostMon Aug 26, 2013 11:45 pm » by Mumin


Thank you Tjahzi!
as soon as there's new pictures available from Hubble, we will know if those strange images are because of the way Hubble's wide field camera works or not.

As I don't have access to telling Hubble what to take pictures of, all we can do now is wait! :D

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 9578
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 3:24 pm

PostSun Sep 01, 2013 8:20 pm » by *WillEase*


Mumin wrote:I couldn't just take that youtube video for face value and had to check the original HUBBLE image files myself.
There's 8 pictures of the comet that are taken on the same day.
If you align those 8 pictures you get the weirdest thing ever!
It looks like a huge triangular object that turns on and off parts of its edges.
As the position of those lit edges stays the same, even when they're turned off and later turned on, I can't imagine how this could be explained with long exposure and stacking.

I just made this gif, so it's a DTV exclusive :D

it's wider than 750 pixels, so you have to click on the link:
http://i.imgur.com/4gOMbwf.gif


Prove it! Where is the link to the original images you used?
Not here...
http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/query/Ison/

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2531
Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:23 pm
Location: Lahaina , HI

PostSun Sep 01, 2013 8:36 pm » by Kerrblur2


*WillEase* wrote:
Mumin wrote:I couldn't just take that youtube video for face value and had to check the original HUBBLE image files myself.
There's 8 pictures of the comet that are taken on the same day.
If you align those 8 pictures you get the weirdest thing ever!
It looks like a huge triangular object that turns on and off parts of its edges.
As the position of those lit edges stays the same, even when they're turned off and later turned on, I can't imagine how this could be explained with long exposure and stacking.

I just made this gif, so it's a DTV exclusive :D

it's wider than 750 pixels, so you have to click on the link:
http://i.imgur.com/4gOMbwf.gif


Prove it! Where is the link to the original images you used?
Not here...
http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/query/Ison/


the original images from that date were darkened to get that strange image inside the white mesh of the comet. you can get the original hubble image, darken it a few shades, and you will see
http://www.disclose.tv/forum/the-smokey-god-audio-book-t86832.html
The autobiography of olaf Jenson and his journey to the inner earth.

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:03 pm

PostSun Sep 01, 2013 8:51 pm » by Mumin


Will:

I think I wrote that I used the raw pictures from hubble, and not the processed ones you just linked to.
here's one of the pictures taken on that day:
http://hla.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/display?im ... WFC3+F606W

drag a little bit to the top to see the comet.
This interactive image viewer lets you use gamma control on the raw data by letting you push on the "darker" and "brighter" button on top.

try it out.

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 9578
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 3:24 pm

PostSun Sep 01, 2013 9:25 pm » by *WillEase*


Mumin wrote:Will:

I think I wrote that I used the raw pictures from hubble, and not the processed ones you just linked to.
here's one of the pictures taken on that day:
http://hla.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/display?im ... WFC3+F606W

drag a little bit to the top to see the comet.
This interactive image viewer lets you use gamma control on the raw data by letting you push on the "darker" and "brighter" button on top.

try it out.


The image is the result of combining 3 exposures that produce the 3 components, and the shapes are produced by the combined motion of the Hubble telescope and the comet.

Image

That image (shown above) is the average of 3 separate Hubble exposures. The 3 exposures are available individually for display or download from the web page, as is the combined image.

http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/ison/di ... ml#27jun13

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 776
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:03 pm

PostSun Sep 01, 2013 10:04 pm » by Mumin


Will,

three separate exposures would look like this, yes.
This link explains it quite well:
http://archive.stsci.edu/hla/ison/


PreviousNext

  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook