Ison 2013

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PostMon Aug 26, 2013 11:11 pm » by Shaggietrip


I will start this thread to keep an eye on Ison. Not to say that some can not post future near Earth objects or of things at later date if something come by. I am not try to make a redundant thread. But some are Titled differently and want to make sure we understand what this is about.


I will post a few Videos to get things going. Post your finds and or images as things progress.


the following are from BPEarthWatch


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Ison tool for seeing approach


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This get a bit on religious at beginnig so do freak and stop skip through if you do not want to hear that part.


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I hope many are caught up to this point by reading other threads. If not post question I will try to get answers best i can. I hope others with thoughts or answers will post theirs. If you have any thing to add please do. The more we have in this thread the more we have for research or a data base to refer to at later date.




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PostTue Aug 27, 2013 12:02 am » by *WillEase*


bump for future reference.

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PostTue Aug 27, 2013 5:34 pm » by *WillEase*


If you want the best images available of objects in space, Hubble Space Telescope is the way to go...

Hubble's First Glimpse of Comet ISON

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For eons, Comet ISON has drifted in the cold, far reaches of our solar system’s Oort Cloud. We don’t yet know ISON’s fate, but we do know this: the comet’s long sleep is over.

When first imaged by Hubble on April 10, ISON was only just inside the orbit of Jupiter. Even then, the Sun was warming ISON’s surface, causing a coma of gas to form as ice sublimates – transitions directly from a solid to a gas. Researchers hope the changes ISON was undergoing this spring will shed light on what the comet has in store for stargazers this fall.

This early image doesn’t appear to show much. The Hubble filter we used lets in light across the visible spectrum, not in specific colors – the blue and white in this image just show how the comet’s overall brightness falls off as you get farther away from the nucleus. With clever analysis, though, this image can speak volumes.

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The above image is tricky. It’s not what Hubble saw. Instead, it’s a comparison of what Hubble saw with what researchers assume a comet might look like. Since a coma is a cloud of dust and gas shed from a comet’s nucleus, this model assumes that a coma will be uniform, fading only as you get farther and farther away from the core.

But real comet comas don’t work that way, ISON included. The uniform model has been subtracted from the actual coma, so bright areas show where the coma is brighter than expected from the model. It’s obvious that the real coma is brightest where it faces the Sun (which is way, way off in the upper right).

From this comparison, we can infer that the nucleus feeds the coma by producing a jet of gas and dust where the sunlight strikes it. This makes sense: ice sublimates into plumes of gas from the sunny side, which then exposes new pockets and crevices to the Sun.

Comet ISON is awake, and it’s warming up.

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PostTue Aug 27, 2013 5:49 pm » by *WillEase*


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PostTue Aug 27, 2013 6:12 pm » by *WillEase*


Comet ISON Basics

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What is Comet ISON?

Comet ISON is an approaching comet with the potential to put on a stunning show in late 2013. It’s a type of comet known as a “sungrazer,” which means its orbit will bring it close to the Sun -- specifically,within 800,000 miles (1.2 million km) of the Sun’s surface. As the comet’s ice and volatiles react to the heat of the Sun, it could develop a long tail and brighten to the point where it can be seen with the naked eye.

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A different sungrazer, Comet Lovejoy, over Santiago de Chile in 2011 Credit: ESO/Yuri Beletsky

Did you say, “potential?” What do you mean, “could?”

It’s difficult to judge at this point whether Comet ISON will be an impressive sight or fizzle out. There are many factors in play. Pros: the comet was bright enough to be discovered when it was quite far away (almost seven times the distance from the Earth to the Sun), it comes from a place that tends to give birth to brilliant comets, and its orbit will bring it near enough the Sun to create a spectacle. Cons: Comets are unpredictable, this one has already failed to brighten as expected, and it could disintegrate when it nears the Sun.

Will it hit us?

No. It will be about 40 million miles (65 million km) away at its closest approach to Earth.

But I’ve totally heard it’s going to hit us. Someone sent me an email written in all-caps.

If you spend all your time in that bunker, you’re going to miss the pretty f*n comet.
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Speaking of that, I’ve heard it might be as bright as the Sun.

That would be cool. But it won’t happen. The Sun is really, really, really bright. Around 150,000 times brighter.

I’ve heard it’s going to be the Comet of the Century.

There’s a chance. On the other hand, this century is all of 13 years old, and history is littered with Comet of the Century letdowns and the bitter tears of astronomy fans. We won’t know how dazzling Comet ISON might be until it draws closer, and we get a look at how it begins to behave as it nears the Sun.

Why is Hubble looking at it?

Hubble is the best tool to study the small comet nucleus -- the source of all the action. In early images Hubble can also detect the coma and tail. But as the comet gets closer, the coma and tail will become too big for Hubble's field of view, and ground-based astrophotographers will produce the most stunning images. But Hubble will still be able to examine the nucleus best, which will be critical if the comet shatters into pieces.

What is a comet, anyway? Is it like a shooting star or an asteroid?

A comet is basically a big, dusty ball of ice, a piece of debris left over from the formation of the solar system. If a comet gets near enough to the Sun, the ice and frozen gases start to vaporize and escape into space, creating a tail that streams away from the Sun. Comets originate in the outer solar system, and are visible in the sky for extended periods of time. Asteroids are also left over from the solar system’s formation, but they’re mostly made up of rock. They originate from the inner solar system, mostly between Mars and Jupiter. Shooting stars are meteors – bits of dust that burn up swiftly as they enter Earth’s atmosphere. Interestingly, the dust that gives rise to meteors is left behind by comets as they pass our planet.

Where did it come from?

Comet ISON is what is known as a long-period comet, which means it comes from the scattered disk of debris in the Oort Cloud region, near the very boundary of our solar system. A gravitational shoving match with another object out there jolted it out of its orbit and sent it sailing toward the inner solar system. Short-period comets – the kind you see returning to the inner solar system again and again, like Halley’s Comet – are from the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune, a thousand times closer. Long-period comets only appear once, and are gone forever. They either get ripped apart by the Sun or end up back adrift in the Oort Cloud.

Why is its origin important?

Some of the most famous comets are long-period comets. They have a lot of volatiles like ammonia and methane stored in abundant water ice, and when they encounter the Sun they have a lot more material to burn off than comets that visit repeatedly. This makes them very bright.

How do I see it?

Comet ISON could be visible from both Northern and Southern hemispheres, but the best view will be from the Northern Hemisphere. It could be visible in binoculars by late October, growing steadily brighter through November. Late November and early December will be best for viewing if the comet survives its approach to the Sun on Nov. 28. The comet will appear in both the early morning and early evening in the Northern Hemisphere, but it will rise with the Sun in the Southern Hemisphere. We’ll have more information on how to view Comet ISON as it draws closer.

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PostTue Aug 27, 2013 6:26 pm » by *WillEase*


You should change the name to "Ison Updates" or "All About Ison".
You don't really want to start this thread with a title that is wrong?
Ison is not a rock. If it were a rock, it would be called an asteroid or meteor.

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PostSun Sep 01, 2013 4:50 am » by Shaggietrip


thank you for the posts *WillEase*

Title changed. Keep in mind new theories may conflict with the Iceball. I will begin to keep closer look at ison. I do hope others do also and post the finds.


Please post items. It will be coming in fast at this point.


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PostSun Sep 01, 2013 4:38 pm » by *WillEase*


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PostSun Sep 01, 2013 5:21 pm » by The57ironman


.

.....what a great idea for a thread....


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..... If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.......
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PostSun Sep 01, 2013 5:45 pm » by *WillEase*


Shaggietrip wrote:thank you for the posts *WillEase*

Title changed. Keep in mind new theories may conflict with the Iceball.

:cheers:


Would you need for me to debunk the stupid 'Ison is a spaceship' theory?
(I've already prepared my rebuttal material, I just want to know if it is necessary to post it)


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