Jung Quote I Had to Share

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PostMon Oct 18, 2010 2:46 am » by Cornbread714


I've been reading Carl Jung again lately (hence my latest sig) and I ran across this in the book The Undiscovered Self and thought the quote was timely even though it was written in 1957:

"The State, like the Church, demands enthusiasm, self-sacrifice and love, and if religion requires or presupposes the 'fear of God', then the dictator State takes care to provide the necessary terror."

Seems pretty accurate to me...
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PostTue Oct 19, 2010 3:07 am » by Cornbread714


The Undiscovered Self also points out the fact that we cling to the idea of community as being our salvation but asks the question:

How can the community be expected to rise above the failings of the individual?

At least that's the way I understood it.
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PostMon Apr 18, 2011 8:22 am » by Eliakim


cornbread714 wrote:The Undiscovered Self also points out the fact that we cling to the idea of community as being our salvation but asks the question:

How can the community be expected to rise above the failings of the individual?

At least that's the way I understood it.


By taking the inner journey to heal the self.

At the end of Jung's life he did declare that he wished that he had spent his whole life dedicated to spiritual alchemy and mysticism because the mystical healers already knew what he had spent his whole life studying.

The renowned psychologist Carl Jung wrote

"Neither family nor society nor position can save man from his fate; nor yet the most successful adaptation to his environment, however smoothly he fits in. The development of personality is a favour that must be paid for dearly.

But the people who talk most loudly about developing their personalities are the very ones who are least mindful of the results, which are such as to frighten away weaker spirits.

Yet the development of the personality means more than just the fear of hatching for monsters of isolation. It also means fidelity to the law of one's own being. For the word "fidelity" I should prefer, in this context, the Greek used in the New Testement, which is erroneously translated "faith"". It literally means "trust", "trustful loyalty."

Fidelity to the law of one's own being (Science of Being and the barometer of balance -v- imbalance) is a trust in this law, a loyal perseverance and confident hope; in short, an attitude such as a religious man should have towards God. It can now be seen how portentous is the dilemma that emerges from behind the problem: personality can never develop unless the individual chooses his own way, consciously and with moral deliberation. Not only the causal motive - necessity - but conscious moral decision must lend its strength to the process of building the personality. If the first is lacking, then the alleged development is mere acrobatics of the will; if the second, it will get stuck in unconscious automatism. But a man can make a moral decision to go his own way only if he holds that way to be best. If any other way were held to be better, then he would live and develop that other personality (persona) instead of his own.

(Basically, Plato said the same)

The other ways are conventionalities of a moral, social, political, philosophical, or religious nature. The fact that the conventions always flourish in one form or another only proves that the vast majority of mankind do not choose their own way, but convention, and consequently develop not themselves but a method and a collective mode of life at the cost of their own wholeness.

Just as the psychic and social life of mankind at the primitive level is exclusively group life which a high degree of unconsciousness among the individuals composing it, so the historical process of development that comes afterwards is in the main collective and will doubtless remain so.

That is why I believe the convention of the to be a collective a necessity. It is a stop gap but not an ideal, either in the moral or religious sense, for submission to it always means renouncing one's wholeness and running away from the final consequences of one's own being."


Basically, sums up what Christ taught as well.

WHOLENESS

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PostMon Apr 18, 2011 12:25 pm » by Svaha


Thanks Cornbread, some quotes that hint at this :


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Follow your bliss(ters) - Joseph Campbell

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PostMon Apr 18, 2011 5:49 pm » by 99socks


cornbread714 wrote:The Undiscovered Self also points out the fact that we cling to the idea of community as being our salvation but asks the question:

How can the community be expected to rise above the failings of the individual?

At least that's the way I understood it.



:think:
http://www.thedailysheeple.com/obamas-doj-silent-as-new-black-panthers-leader-incites-violence-in-ferguson_082014








I can't speak about how much of the Constitution is in effect anymore... But thank God we still somewhat resemble a Republic and not a democracy!


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