Listen America, Mexican Drug Cartels Are Part of Your World

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PostFri Mar 09, 2012 10:25 pm » by Will69ease


Think the horrific violence happening in Mexico will never happen in America? Think again.
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Imagine. You’re sitting on a bus, listening to music, staring sleepily out at the Mexican countryside. Suddenly, the bus screeches to a halt, and there follows a lot of shouting and some random gunshots. Seconds later, gun-wielding mafiosi board the bus and tell the passengers to disembark.

The terrified travelers are divided into groups. The elderly are promptly eradicated, shot in the head in full view of the onlookers. Next, select women are pried from the arms of children and one another, and dragged kicking and screaming behind the bus. Everyone knows their fate. Minutes later, with the old gone, the women and children dead or paralyzed with shock, the attention turns to the last group: the able-bodied males.

The men are herded into a group, which is surrounded by smirking, laughing gangsters. Each man is given a weapon; one gets a rusty old knife, another a machete, another a framer’s hammer. The unlucky are given a stick or rock. Now armed, the bewildered men are instructed to fight. Not the cartel members. One another.

Fear causes their hands to tremble; they’re hesitant. Killing an innocent man, someone you were chatting with only minutes earlier, is not an easy task. But the men quickly realize that the only way to survive is to kill. In a split second, these normal men, husbands and fathers, farmers, bricklayers and factory workers, transform into callous gladiators. Unskilled in the art of murder, their arms flail wildly. Chunks of human flesh fly, the dust turns deep red, and hemorrhaging carcasses begin to collapse. Thirty minutes later, all that remain are a handful of blood-soaked, exhausted, hollow-eyed men. The victims are now victors.

The gangsters, members of Los Zetas, Mexico’s deadliest drug cartel, whoop and holler and sing Mexican folk songs as they toss the bodies in the ditch beside the road. They’re elated, not just because they’ve recently gratified their lusts or grown a little richer, but also because they’ve got new recruits. In the coming days, the male survivors will be exploited. Some will have to infiltrate enemy territory to assassinate rival cartel members. Others will go to war with the Mexican Army. Others will be saddled with drugs and sent across the border into America. No matter the assignment, each will end up dead.

Believe it or not, this happens. Not in Afghanistan, or Iraq, or North Korea. But right across the border, in a nation adored by Americans for its cheap beer and enticing beach resorts. Since 2006, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence in Mexico. The violence spans the country, and is intensifying. In 2006, there were 2,119 cartel-related murders. In 2010, the number shot up to 15,273, and the 2011 total is expected to be somewhere around 17,000.
http://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/ ... 692716.php

Between the cartel-versus-cartel wars and the cartels-versus-Mexican military wars, “some parts of Mexico can credibly be described as a war zone,” Stratfor reported this week. The violence runs the gamut of barbaric too, ranging from simple shootings to decapitation and dismemberment, or being buried alive head first or dropped in acid. No one is immune either. The cartels often kidnap innocent people, and have no qualms about using their AK-47s in public places.

If you live in America it’s possible, though not necessarily likely, you’ve heard a little about Mexico’s out-of-control violence.

What you probably don’t know, however, is that these drug cartels are deeply entrenched in the United States!

The fact that you haven’t heard too much about this isn’t your fault. The U.S. government and mainstream media have been astonishingly silent on this issue. (This shameful silence is perhaps as significant as the cartel violence and infiltration itself.) It’s a real and extremely dire crisis—that very few in America want to talk about.

In 2008, the U.S. Justice Department warned that “Mexican dtos [drug trafficking organizations] are the most pervasive organizational threat to the United States. They are active in every region of the country and dominate the illicit drug trade in every area …” (emphasis added throughout). That was four years ago.
http://www.justice.gov/ndic/pubs27/27986/27986p.pdf

Today, Mexican drug cartels have established a foothold in every U.S. state.

They’re present in more than one thousand American cities.

In a 2009 interview with a local cnn station in Atlanta, William Newell, the special agent in charge of the Phoenix branch of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives at the time, explained the ultimate ambition of the cartels. Their goal, he said, “is to come to the United States and take over.” That statement, from an official stationed on the front lines of the drug war, ought to deeply alarm the U.S. government. And it ought to have made prime-time cnn national news. The way these cartels “take over is very violent,” Newell continued.

“We’re seeing signs of people being tortured and brutally beaten all across the U.S., not just along the southwest border.”

In August 2008, five bodies were discovered in an apartment in an affluent neighborhood in Birmingham, Alabama. The victims had been tortured before being murdered by cartel members. Drug Enforcement Administration special agent Gregory Borland worked the case and told reporters the violence was at a “level we’ve never seen before.”

Americans like to “make themselves feel better by saying that [torture] is not part of my world,” Borland said.

His job, he stated, is to tell naive Americans that cartel violence “is a part of your world.”

The number of cartel-related deaths inside America isn’t high—yet. But this isn’t a crisis of numbers—it’s about the presence of exceptionally violent drug cartels inside America. All of Mexico’s largest cartels—the Sinaloa Federation, Los Zetas, La Familia Nichoacana (lfm), the Gulf Cartel (cdg), the Juarez Cartel, the Tijuana Cartel—are operating in all of America’s major cities, from Phoenix to Maine, Boise to Anchorage.

Large cities like Dallas, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Miami, New York, El Paso, Houston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, San Antonio and San Diego are drug hubs. Bulk loads of drugs such as cocaine, marijuana and meth are taken to warehouses in these cities where the drugs are re-processed, re-packaged and dispatched to smaller markets. “The same folks who are rolling heads in the streets of Ciudad Juarez are operating in Atlanta,” warned Jack Killorin, the head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In America, “they are just better behaved.”

For now.

In Cartel, Sylvia Longmire, a specialist in Mexico’s drug wars, gives an eye-opening glimpse into the state of affairs. She writes, “[F]or [Americans] living in or near a decent-sized metropolitan area, chances are pretty high that their hometown is infested with drugs being managed by one of the Mexican cartels.” Think about that—a member of Los Zetas could be living down the street from you.

In many cities, the cartels have developed alliances with local gangs and criminal organizations. The gangs provide the cartels with storage and transportation, and in return the cartels supply the gangs with a wholesale supply of drugs. These deadly relationships often come with horrific consequences. In an interview on Lou Dobbs, Stratfor analyst Fred Burton explained: “Street violence in Los Angeles, Portland, Chicago, New York City or Washington, d.c., is directly attributable to the violence that’s taking place in Mexico. Meaning, the cartels are working with criminal gangs inside the United States, and they’re carrying out these violent murders and crimes on the streets of America.”
[youtube]xZPAb50X7tQ&feature=related[/youtube]

That’s a blockbuster headline—“Mexican Drug Cartels Operating on America’s Streets”—that you don’t see in the mainstream press.

Right now, the violence tends to be worse in regions and cities close to the border. In some areas, it’s gotten so bad that parts of the border are actually controlled by the cartels. These cartels have agents stationed on hills and ridges, who watch the border with binoculars and shoot dead any illegals who dare to cross into America without cartel approval. Think on that. Can America even call itself a sovereign nation if it doesn’t control its borders?

For now, it’s in the best interest of the cartels to lie low in the U.S. They try to avoid local and federal authorities, and only resort to violence when they deem it necessary. But think about the deadly concoction brewing in hundreds of American cities. Unemployment is growing, especially among the youth. Racial tension is rising. Many American cities are already overwhelmed with gang violence and organized crime. Now, add the presence of some of the most violent organizations in the world to that mix. It’s another gargantuan crisis just waiting to explode!

It might be okay as long as the cartels inside the U.S. are allowed to ply their trade. But what’s going to happen when the gangs get testy—or worse, state or federal authorities decide to crack down on them? The drug violence in Mexico actually took off in 2006, when Prime Minister Felipe Calderon decided to get tough with the cartels. Since then, tens of thousands of Mexican soldiers have been rallied to combat the cartels. The result? More violence, more kidnappings, more mass graves.

Imagine the anarchy that would result if the U.S. government decided to confront the cartels.

Then again, imagine the inevitable violence and anarchy that will come if the government remains idle and allows the cartels to continue to operate.

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PostFri Mar 09, 2012 10:48 pm » by domdabears


Ummmmm what's a Mexican?... :headscratch:

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Like... fur sure
I wanna be a Warhol
Displayed on your wall
Still hung up on you

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PostFri Mar 09, 2012 11:10 pm » by Zegtelzegtel


I came across this site a few days ago while searching stuff on the cartels
http://www.borderlandbeat.com/

Check this out..that.guy is a hero

Don Alejo Garza Tamez

When Mexican Marines arrived at the San Jose Ranch, 15 kilometers from Victoria, Tamaulipas, the scene was bleak: The austere main house was practically destroyed by grenades and heavy gunfire.

Outside of the home, they found four bodies. Cautiously, and with their weapons drawn, the troops continued inspecting the exterior and found two more gunmen, wounded and unconscious, but alive.

Inside the house only one body was found, riddled with bullets and with two weapons by it's side. The body was identified as Don Alejo Garza Tamez, the owner of the ranch and a highly respected businessman in Nuevo Leon.

Upon further inspection of the interior, marines found weapons and ammunition at every window and door. This allowed them to reconstruct how, just hours prior, the battle had played out.

Marines searched for more bodies inside the house, but none were to be found. It seemed hard to believe that one person, armed only with hunting rifles, had caused so many casualties on the attackers.

Dozens of spent shells and the smell of gunpowder gave proof of the tenacity of the man who fought to the end in defense, of not only his ranch, but his dignity.

In the end, it was deduced the man had created his own defense strategy to fight alone, placing weapons at every door and window.

The story began in the morning of Saturday November 13, when a group of armed gunmen went to deliver an ultimatum to Don Alejo Garza Tamez: He had 24 hours to turn over his property or suffer the consequences.

Using the diplomacy he had acquired over nearly eight decades of life, Don Alejo flatly announced that not only would he not be surrendering his property, but that he'd be waiting for them.

When the men had left, Don Alejo gathered his workers and ordered them to take Sunday off, he wanted to be alone.

He dedicated the rest of Saturday to taking stock of his weapons and ammunition and creating a military fortress style defense strategy for his home.

The night of Saturday the thirteenth was long and restless, much like his past hunting adventures; Don Alejo woke early. Shortly after 4 a.m. the motors of various trucks could be heard entering the property from a distance.

Marines who investigated the scene could only imagine how it was that morning: armed men, their impunity secured, confident they'd soon be owners of yet another property. Nobody, or almost no one, could hold out against a group of heavily armed gunmen. Only Don Alejo.

The trucks entered the ranch and took up positions surrounding the house. The gunmen got out of their trucks, fired shots in the air, and announced they came to take possession of the ranch. They were expecting the terrified occupants to run out, begging for mercy with their hands in the air.

But things didn't go as expected. Don Alejo welcomed them with bullets; the entire army of gunmen returned fire. Don Alejo seemed to multiply, he seemed to be everywhere. The minutes would have seemed endless to those who had seen him as easy prey. Various gunmen were killed on sight. The others, in rage and frustration, intensified the attack by swapping out their assault rifles for grenades.

When everything finally fell silent, the air was left heavy with gunpowder. The holes left in the walls and the windows attested to the violence of the attack. When they went in search of what they had assumed was a large contingent, they were surprised to find only one man, Don Alejo.

The surviving gunmen did not take over the ranch. Thinking the military would arrive at any moment, they decided to run. They left behind what they thought were six corpses, but two of their gunmen had survived.

Shortly after, the Marines arrived and methodically reconstructed the events. A lone rancher, a man who worked a lifetime to be able to enjoy the fruits of his labor such as his ranch, had defended it to his death.

In the last hunt of his life, Don Alejo surprised the group of assassins who wanted to impose the same law on his ranch that they had on the State, the law of the jungle.

The marines who were present will never forget the scene: a 77 year old man, who before death, took out four gunmen, fighting the same as the best soldiers: with dignity, courage, and honor.

Rest in Peace Don Alejo Garza Tamez

A Man of His Word

- Don Alejo Garza was a proud Norteño. He was born in Allende, Nuevo leon in 1933. He childhood was spent in the most wooded areas of the state.

-Allende, located 50 miles south of Monterrey, is crossed by National Highway 85 that leads to Ciudad Victoria, Tampico and Veracruz. This community is located at the base of the Sierra Madre Oriental.

-His father owned a sawmill, and he learned early in his youth, along with his older brothers, how to work, saw, and sell wood. Driven by this activity he eventually founded the timber supply store El Salto in Monterrey, taking the name from the place where they bought the product.

- As a young man he had to travel constantly to Parral, Chihuahua, and El Salto, Durango, to buy the wood which would then be sold in Monterrey. His family was successful in this field and opened branches in Allende, his hometown, and Montemorelos.

- Don Alejo began fishing and hunting as a child. As a young man he began to collect weapons. Among his friends and associates he was known as an excellent shooter who, in the company of his friends, hunted deer, geese and pigeons.

- Don Alejo Garza Tamez was one of the founding members of the "Dr. Maria Manuel Silva" Hunting, Shooting and Fishing Club, located in Allende, Nuevo León.

- He and his brother, Rodolfo, bought the San Jose Ranch in Tamaulipas and divided it between them. Don Alejo's half bordered with the Padilla Lake and Rodolfo's with the Coronoa river.

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PostSat Mar 10, 2012 1:46 am » by Cornbread714


zegtelzegtel wrote:I came across this site a few days ago while searching stuff on the cartels
http://www.borderlandbeat.com/

Check this out..that.guy is a hero

Don Alejo Garza Tamez

When Mexican Marines arrived at the San Jose Ranch, 15 kilometers from Victoria, Tamaulipas, the scene was bleak: The austere main house was practically destroyed by grenades and heavy gunfire.

Outside of the home, they found four bodies. Cautiously, and with their weapons drawn, the troops continued inspecting the exterior and found two more gunmen, wounded and unconscious, but alive.

Inside the house only one body was found, riddled with bullets and with two weapons by it's side. The body was identified as Don Alejo Garza Tamez, the owner of the ranch and a highly respected businessman in Nuevo Leon.

Upon further inspection of the interior, marines found weapons and ammunition at every window and door. This allowed them to reconstruct how, just hours prior, the battle had played out.

Marines searched for more bodies inside the house, but none were to be found. It seemed hard to believe that one person, armed only with hunting rifles, had caused so many casualties on the attackers.

Dozens of spent shells and the smell of gunpowder gave proof of the tenacity of the man who fought to the end in defense, of not only his ranch, but his dignity.

In the end, it was deduced the man had created his own defense strategy to fight alone, placing weapons at every door and window.

The story began in the morning of Saturday November 13, when a group of armed gunmen went to deliver an ultimatum to Don Alejo Garza Tamez: He had 24 hours to turn over his property or suffer the consequences.

Using the diplomacy he had acquired over nearly eight decades of life, Don Alejo flatly announced that not only would he not be surrendering his property, but that he'd be waiting for them.

When the men had left, Don Alejo gathered his workers and ordered them to take Sunday off, he wanted to be alone.

He dedicated the rest of Saturday to taking stock of his weapons and ammunition and creating a military fortress style defense strategy for his home.

The night of Saturday the thirteenth was long and restless, much like his past hunting adventures; Don Alejo woke early. Shortly after 4 a.m. the motors of various trucks could be heard entering the property from a distance.

Marines who investigated the scene could only imagine how it was that morning: armed men, their impunity secured, confident they'd soon be owners of yet another property. Nobody, or almost no one, could hold out against a group of heavily armed gunmen. Only Don Alejo.

The trucks entered the ranch and took up positions surrounding the house. The gunmen got out of their trucks, fired shots in the air, and announced they came to take possession of the ranch. They were expecting the terrified occupants to run out, begging for mercy with their hands in the air.

But things didn't go as expected. Don Alejo welcomed them with bullets; the entire army of gunmen returned fire. Don Alejo seemed to multiply, he seemed to be everywhere. The minutes would have seemed endless to those who had seen him as easy prey. Various gunmen were killed on sight. The others, in rage and frustration, intensified the attack by swapping out their assault rifles for grenades.

When everything finally fell silent, the air was left heavy with gunpowder. The holes left in the walls and the windows attested to the violence of the attack. When they went in search of what they had assumed was a large contingent, they were surprised to find only one man, Don Alejo.

The surviving gunmen did not take over the ranch. Thinking the military would arrive at any moment, they decided to run. They left behind what they thought were six corpses, but two of their gunmen had survived.

Shortly after, the Marines arrived and methodically reconstructed the events. A lone rancher, a man who worked a lifetime to be able to enjoy the fruits of his labor such as his ranch, had defended it to his death.

In the last hunt of his life, Don Alejo surprised the group of assassins who wanted to impose the same law on his ranch that they had on the State, the law of the jungle.

The marines who were present will never forget the scene: a 77 year old man, who before death, took out four gunmen, fighting the same as the best soldiers: with dignity, courage, and honor.

Rest in Peace Don Alejo Garza Tamez

A Man of His Word

- Don Alejo Garza was a proud Norteño. He was born in Allende, Nuevo leon in 1933. He childhood was spent in the most wooded areas of the state.

-Allende, located 50 miles south of Monterrey, is crossed by National Highway 85 that leads to Ciudad Victoria, Tampico and Veracruz. This community is located at the base of the Sierra Madre Oriental.

-His father owned a sawmill, and he learned early in his youth, along with his older brothers, how to work, saw, and sell wood. Driven by this activity he eventually founded the timber supply store El Salto in Monterrey, taking the name from the place where they bought the product.

- As a young man he had to travel constantly to Parral, Chihuahua, and El Salto, Durango, to buy the wood which would then be sold in Monterrey. His family was successful in this field and opened branches in Allende, his hometown, and Montemorelos.

- Don Alejo began fishing and hunting as a child. As a young man he began to collect weapons. Among his friends and associates he was known as an excellent shooter who, in the company of his friends, hunted deer, geese and pigeons.

- Don Alejo Garza Tamez was one of the founding members of the "Dr. Maria Manuel Silva" Hunting, Shooting and Fishing Club, located in Allende, Nuevo León.

- He and his brother, Rodolfo, bought the San Jose Ranch in Tamaulipas and divided it between them. Don Alejo's half bordered with the Padilla Lake and Rodolfo's with the Coronoa river.


That was one tough old Mexican. Wow.
Where's the beer and when do I get paid?
- Jimmy Carl Black (the Indian of the group)



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