long shelf life foods

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PostWed May 09, 2012 9:38 pm » by Flecktarn


Indefinite Storage Life Items:

Salt
Raw Honey (do not pack in Mylar... what a mess that would be)
White Sugar

30 Year Items:

Hard Grains (Whole)
-Buckwheat
-Corn, Dry
-Flax
-Kamut
-Millet
-Durum wheat
-Hard red wheat
-Hard white wheat
-Soft wheat
-Special bake wheat
-Spelt
-Triticale
Oats (whole or rolled)
Rice
Beans
-Adzuki Beans
-Blackeye Beans
-Black Turtle Beans
-Garbanzo Beans
-Great Northern
-Kidney Beans
-Lentils
-Lima Beans
-Mung Beans
-Pink Beans
-Pinto Beans
-Small Red Beans
-Soy Beans
Macaroni
Powdered Milk
Potato Flakes
Dried Apple Slices.
Dehydrated Vegetables

20 Year Items:


10 - 15 Year Items:

Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP)
Dehydrated Dairy Products
-Cheese Powder
-Cocoa Powder
-Powder Eggs
-Butter/Margarine Powder
-Whey Powder


8 – 10 Year Items:

Soft Grains (Whole)
-Barley
-Hulled or Pearled Oat
-Groats
-Quinoa
-Rye
Brown Rice
Shortening

3 - 5 Year Items:

Peanut Butter Powder
Coffee (Possibly Longer. Minor flavor loss in the first 2 weeks)
Bottled Butter (3 years google "bottled butter" or visit Wendy DeWitt's blog)
Chocolate (Vacuum packed in canning jars)
Meats** (See Note)
Brown Sugar (Vacuum packed in canning jars)

1 - 2 year Items:

Flours* and Other Products Made From Cracked/Ground Seed
Yeast (1 year if frozen)
Fresh Eggs 1 year (lightly coated in mineral oil and stored point down in a cool place. I have not tested this yet)

*Flour stored longer than a year or two will make perfect looking loafs of bread but the bread will taste bad. LDS package flour in #10 cans with O2 absorbers and give it a 10 year shelf life. SO this remains up in the air and I would suggest testing and erring on the side of caution.


How long will vegetable seeds last if stored properly?


Seed Type / Years
Asparagus 3
Muskmelons 5
Beans 3
Onions 1
Beets 4
Peas 3
Broccoli 5
Peppers 2
Cabbage 5
Pumpkins 4
Carrots 3
Radishes 5
Cauliflower 5
Spinach 5
Corn 2
Squash 4
Cucumbers 5
Tomatoes 4
Lettuce 5
Watermelons 4


Asparagus Asparagus officinalis Liiaceae 3
BeansPhaseolus vulgaris (& others) Fabaceae 3
Beets Beta vulgaris Chenopodiaceae 4
BroccoliBrassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Cabbage Brassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Cardoon Cynara cardunculus Asteraceae 5
Carrots Daucus carota sativus Apiaceae 3
Cauliflower Brassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Celeriac Apium graveolens rapaceum Apiaceae 5
Celery Apium graveolens dulce Apiaceae 5
Chervil Anthriscus cerefolium Apiaceae 3
Collards Brassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Corn Zea mays Poaceae 2
Cress Lepidium sativum Brassicaceae 5
Cucumbers Cucumis melo Cucurbitaceae 5
Eggplant Solanum melongena Solanaceae 5
Endive Cichorium endivia Asteraceae 5
Fennel Foeniculum vulgare Apiaceae 4
Kale Brassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Kohlrabi Brassica oleracea Brassicaceae 5
Leeks Allium porrum Liiaceae 3
Lettuce Lactuca sativa Asteraceae 5
Muskmelons Cucumis melo Cucurbitaceae 5
Mustard Brassica cretica Brassicaceae 4
Okra Abelmoschus esculentus Solanaceae 2
Onions Allium cepa Amaryllidaceae 1
Parsley Petroselinum crispum Apiaceae 1
Parsnips Pastinaca sativa Apiaceae 1
Peas Pisum sativum Fabaceae 3
Peppers Capsicum annuum Solanaceae 2
Pumpkins Cucurbita maxima Cucurbitaceae 4
Radishes Raphanus landra Brassicaceae 5
Spinach Spinacia oleracea Chenopodiaceae 5
Squash Cucurbita moschata;
C. pepo and C. maxima Cucurbitaceae 4
Swiss Chard Beta vulgaris Chenopodiaceae 4
Tomatoes Lycopersicon esculentum Solanaceae 4
Turnips Brassica rapa Brassicaceae 4
Watermelons Citrullus lanatus Cucurbitaceae 4


Collards 5
Corn salad (mache) 5
Cress 5
Cucumber 5
Endive 5
Lettuce 5
Muskmelon ("Cantelope") 5
Beets 4
Brussels Sprouts 4
Cabbage 4
Cauliflower 4
Chard, Swiss 4
Chicory 4
Eggplant 4
Kale 4
Pumpkin 4
Radish 4
Rutabaga 4
Sorrel 4
Squash 4
Tomato 4
Turnip 4
Watermelon 4
Asparagus 3
Beans 3
Broccoli 3
Cabbage, Chinese 3
Carrot 3
Celeriac 3
Celery 3
Kohlrabi 3
New Zealand Spinach 3
Pea 3
Corn, sweet 2
Leek 2
Okra 2
Pepper 2
Onion 1
Parsley 1
Parsnip 1
Salsify 1
Scorzonera 1
Spinach 1

Storing Seeds

"If you are unsure of the seed quality, you can run a germination test. Count out at least 20 randomly picked seeds (50 is better, 100 is best). Spread the seeds on several layers of premoistened paper toweling and roll them up in the paper so the seeds stay separated from one another. Place the roll into a plastic bag and keep it in a warm place (70o to 80o F). Remember to label each roll with seed type. Check the seeds in two or three days, and every day thereafter for a week or so. When a root or cotyledon protrudes through the seed coat, the seed has germinated. When some seeds have sprouted, and a one-week wait indicates that no more are about to emerge, you can calculate your rate of germination. Divide the number of seeds germinated by the number of seeds tested to find out your germination percentage. If handled very carefully, germinated seeds may be planted in the garden (if the planting time is right) or in cell packs and peat pots for further growth. If the root or shoot is damaged in the transplanting process, the plant will not survive."
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PostWed May 09, 2012 9:48 pm » by Doogle


Thinking of going somewhere Fleck?

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PostWed May 09, 2012 9:51 pm » by Flecktarn


some skills also worth learning and practicing is food preservation like salting and smoking and pickling jam and pickle making etc ,not only will it save you money but one day it could save your life ,or why not try foraging for nuts and fruit and learn what available in your area not only dose it feed you its also fun ,if you have never fished give it a try it another skill then learned :flop:
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PostWed May 09, 2012 9:54 pm » by Flecktarn


Doogle wrote:Thinking of going somewhere Fleck?

passing on info useful for if the shtf
i have taught survival courses and think people forget that even simple things learned could save them and there family's ,,as good old baden powell said be prepared
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PostWed May 09, 2012 10:03 pm » by Doogle


I am aware that there are soooo many edible plants just sitting there that we walk by every day, like wild garlic. Have you tried it? I like it meself; And mushrooms - got a coupla books, but am still too wary just yet, although that's cool. Don't want to pick a bad one. I'm pretty clued on native magic varieties though!

Anyway, I was thinking this the other day. I grow a load of my/our own veg (not enough to survive on -yet), but it would be useless if the water supply was contaminated to fuck.

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PostWed May 09, 2012 10:17 pm » by Flecktarn


i have lived off the land and survived and taught survival at wilderness events and have a long military career so survival and living rough is second nature , i did a thread on water storage ,most people are clued up on whats edible and whats not but a large majority haven't got a clue,, the supermarket brigade ,like if there was a power cut today and lasted for say 2 weeks see how many people wouldn't cope and have no reserves of food or water ,and something like this could happen ,so why not learn and practice skills that just might help
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PostWed May 09, 2012 10:37 pm » by Doogle


I think it's only a matter of when TSHTF.

Just look at the way people panic-buy when it gets a bit cloudy. Jeez. You know what, I often think that if society was to crumble, the ones that would be the best able to cope would be the outdoors types, even campers, fuck, even festival goers (some of those are a fight for survival!).
I know so many people that think I'm weird for going camping and wild swimming, the same people that can only put up with hotels if they go anywhere - how would they cope? The pussies.

Am I right in thinkin you up in Scotland?

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PostWed May 09, 2012 11:20 pm » by Flecktarn


Doogle wrote:I think it's only a matter of when TSHTF.

Just look at the way people panic-buy when it gets a bit cloudy. Jeez. You know what, I often think that if society was to crumble, the ones that would be the best able to cope would be the outdoors types, even campers, fuck, even festival goers (some of those are a fight for survival!).
I know so many people that think I'm weird for going camping and wild swimming, the same people that can only put up with hotels if they go anywhere - how would they cope? The pussies.

Am I right in thinkin you up in Scotland?

Bristol its dr jones whos up in scotland ,camping is great because you can cope with the noises and the outdoors ,i taught at a corporate event and the punters did camping they were full of shit all day the know it all office types yet at night in the tents they were scared of every single noise like kids ,,so some are cut out for it and others just wont cope and mate your not weird doing this stuff your a person able to survive and the ones that think your weird will be the ones asking you for help :flop: :flop:
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PostThu May 10, 2012 1:01 am » by Haansolo


i remember that show on tv called "the good life" where they tried to be self sufficient and kept chickens to the horror of there middle class neighbors!ah good times eh! :sunny:
"Traveling through hyperspace ain't like dusting crops, boy!



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