Maine town becomes first to declare food sovereignty

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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 12:19 am » by Rydher


The town of Sedgwick, Maine, currently leads the pack as far as food sovereignty is concerned. Local residents recently voted unanimously at a town hall meeting to pass an ordinance that reinforces its citizens' God-given rights to "produce, process, sell, purchase, and consume local foods of their choosing," which includes even state- and federally-restricted foods like raw milk.

The declaration is one of the first of its kind to be passed in the US, and it is definitely not the last. Several other Maine towns -- including Penobscott, Brooksville, and Blue Hill -- all have similar ordinances up for vote in the coming weeks.

"Tears of joy welled in my eyes as my town voted to adopt this ordinance," said Mia Strong, a Sedgwick resident who frequents local farms. "I am so proud of my community. They made a stand for local food and our fundamental rights as citizens to choose that food."

In addition to simply declaring food sovereignty, the ordinance also declares it a crime for state and federal authorities to violate ordinance provisions in any way. The law specifically states that "[i]t shall be unlawful for any law or regulation adopted by the state or federal government to interfere with the rights recognized by this Ordinance." This includes, of course, any attempt to enforce the unconstitutional provisions of the S 510 the HR 2751 food tyranny bills that were recently passed (http://www.naturalnews.com/030789_F...).

And what about potential conflicts that may arise between farmer and patron? The two will agree to enter into private agreements with one another, apart from government interference, and settle any disputes that arise personally and civilly. It is the way things used to be done before Americans sacrificed their freedoms to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other federal agencies that now tell the public what they can and cannot eat.

In December, the state of Vermont drafted its own food sovereignty bill (http://www.naturalnews.com/030827_f...), and several others are considering similar bills as well.

To learn more about how to promote food sovereignty in your town, city, county, or state, visit the Tenth Amendment Center at:
http://www.naturalnews.com/030827_f...

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031667_food_ ... z1HSk0Usle

Credit to : http://www.naturalnews.com/031667_food_freedom_Maine.html

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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 12:29 am » by Nyarelathodep


O snap, thanks for the post man...Im moving to Maine this summer and didnt know that!
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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 12:41 am » by Jeckk


I'd like to see how this plays out. If they somehow manage to avoid state and federal enforcement, then this just might take off nationwide. Chances are they'll run sneaky ops to contaminate food/water in that town and then try to shut it down.

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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 12:55 am » by Anzu81


This is a great idea and should be endorsed but not made a law just to call it one. This statement will be seen a lot

And what about potential conflicts that may arise between farmer and patron? The two will agree to enter into private agreements with one another, apart from government interference, and settle any disputes that arise personally and civilly.

Because when dealing with Raw milk and anything made with Raw Milk items you can become very ill if the cow used to make the milk doesn't eat the right diet. At the least milk should be pasteurized and if you read up on it and know what the blend of grass and weeds the cow eats then you will be fine. I lived on a farm and we did this for only one cow for the family because it takes a lot ground for a cow to feed on when only using the grasses that keep the cows hormones balanced because to much estrogen and you have to pasteurize it.

But I whole heartily believe you should endorse Farm Markets and as much as you think the Government hates you they also believe that because if you use WIC (in the US) which most women can go on when pregnant and up to one year after. You get more money to use at local farmer markets than you do to get to the grocery stores to buy the veggies you need.

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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 1:01 am » by Anzu81


jeckk wrote:I'd like to see how this plays out. If they somehow manage to avoid state and federal enforcement, then this just might take off nationwide. Chances are they'll run sneaky ops to contaminate food/water in that town and then try to shut it down.


That is only if the farmer is making over 500,000 dollars which way more than any farm market producer is going to make. That is for the big produce farmers who use workers that are not so clean in the fields the main reason why people get sick from tomato's and the like that come from the southwest.

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PostThu Mar 24, 2011 1:03 am » by Rydher


Yeah, I'm curious to see what becomes of this and see it in action as well. No doubt that it's going to go to court. For the last year I've made it a point to go to my local farmers market's and buy vegetables. Two of them in town were found out to be bringing in food from other states and the place is a ghost town except for the snow birds that don't know any better. Word is getting around though and I"m sure next year they won't be so busy.

As much as I enjoy seeing freedoms be restored to the people, I'm not an anarchist. I understand the reasoning behind regulations and such, but the problem is you give the government an inch and they take 100 miles.

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PostMon May 16, 2011 2:16 pm » by Rydher


* UPDATE *

State officials in Maine target local food sovereignty bills in effort to thwart food freedom
Monday, May 16, 2011

A battle is erupting in Maine as state bureaucrats challenge the validity of the various food sovereignty bills recently passed by a handful of towns in the Pine Tree State. The bills override numerous provisions in the federal Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) that increase federal and state control over not only small farms, but also individuals and groups that grow, sell, prepare, or otherwise distribute food of any kind.

Some officials insist that local municipalities cannot go against state and federal mandates, but citizens who understand the infamous "Home Rule" system, which is a historical and respected precedent in Maine, have correctly pointed out that both constitutionally and statutorily, local communities can legally pass laws in contradiction to federal and state laws.

NaturalNews readers will recall the passage of the first food sovereignty law in Sedgwick, Maine, back in March (http://www.naturalnews.com/031667_f...). Shortly after its passage, the town of Penobscot followed suit with its own food sovereignty legislation, as did the town of Blue Hill in April (http://www.naturalnews.com/032142_f...).

Maine's strong Home Rule tradition is what has allowed the state's towns to assert the power of self-government in all sorts of issues ranging from banning of genetically-modified (GM) crops in certain areas, to restricting corporate water extraction operations. In other words, Home Rule is what has historically protected towns from overarching government regulation and control, as well as abuses by corporate interests.

Concerning federal food safety legislation, many Maine residents and even politicians understand that retaining the freedom to grow, sell, and buy the food of one's choice without excessive government intervention is crucial to the survival of small, family farms. This is why they are vigorously defending the Home Rule precedent.

"The great push for food safety regulations from the FDA and USDA is misguided and, by hurting small, local food producers, will in the end make our food supply less safe," said Rep. Walter Kumiega, to Food Freedom. "These regulations are needed to make large food producers more safe, although they are arguably a failure, since studies show a majority of supermarket meats are contaminated with diseases ranging from E. coli to MRSA."

Kumiega sponsored LD 330, "An Act To Exempt Farm Food Products and Homemade Food Offered for Sale or for Consumption at Certain Events from Certain Licensing Requirements." The bill never made it out of committee, however.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032412_Maine ... z1MW1hn8Hh

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PostMon May 16, 2011 3:48 pm » by 99socks


rydher wrote:
Maine's strong Home Rule tradition is what has allowed the state's towns to assert the power of self-government in all sorts of issues ranging from banning of genetically-modified (GM) crops in certain areas, to restricting corporate water extraction operations. In other words, Home Rule is what has historically protected towns from overarching government regulation and control, as well as abuses by corporate interests.



That part is the most important, imo.
http://www.thedailysheeple.com/obamas-doj-silent-as-new-black-panthers-leader-incites-violence-in-ferguson_082014








I can't speak about how much of the Constitution is in effect anymore... But thank God we still somewhat resemble a Republic and not a democracy!


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