Mali : blood for uranium

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 918
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am

PostMon Jan 21, 2013 1:30 am » by Edgar 2.0


Looks like the real reasons behind the little Malian affair are becoming more clear now...

The invasion of Iraq in 2003 as part of the ‘Global War on Terror’ was a war in which France refused to directly participate. The general consensus is that the invasion of Iraq was a quest for oil, and yet the French invasion of Mali is not dissimilar.

Like its neighbour, Niger, Mali is rich in a number of resources, including uranium. Following the ‘oil shock’ of 1973 in which the oil producing nations sharply increased the price of oil, the French decided an alternative route was needed. This alternative was nuclear energy, and over the 15 years following the shock, France built 56 nuclear reactors, more than any other country in the world. France now has 59 nuclear reactors, generating nearly 80% of its electricity, making it the world’s largest net electricity exporter. In 1999, the French parliament confirmed three objectives in relation to this newly found wealth, the first: security of supply.


http://ceasefiremagazine.co.uk/blood-uranium-frances-mali-intervention-terrorism/

Gold: Mali: Africa’s third largest gold producer with large scale exploration ongoing. Mali has been famous for its gold since the days of the great Malian empire and the pilgrimage to Mecca of the Emperor Kankou Moussa in 1324, on his caravan he carried more than 8 tonnes of gold! Mali has therefore been traditionally a mining country for over half a millennium.

Mali currently has seven operating gold mines which include: Kalana and Morila in Southern Mali, Yatela, Sadiola and Loulo in Western Mali, and mines which have recently restarted production notably Syama and Tabakoto. Advanced gold exploration projects include: Kofi, Kodieran, Gounkoto, Komana, Banankoro, Kobada and Nampala.

Uranium: encouraging signs and exploration in full swing. Exploration is currently being carried out by several companies with clear indications of deposits of uranium in Mali. Uranium potential is located in the Falea area which covers 150 km² of the Falea- North Guinea basin, a Neoproterozoic sedimentary basin marked by significant radiometric anomalies. Uranium potential in Falea is thought to be 5000 tonnes. The Kidal Project, in the north eastern part of Mali, with an area of 19,930 km2, the project covers a large crystalline geological province known as L’Adrar Des Iforas. Uranium potential in the Samit deposit, Gao region alone is thought to be 200 tonnes.

Diamonds: Mali has potential to develop its diamond exploration: in the Kayes administrative region (Mining region 1), thirty (30) kimberlitic pipes have been discovered of which eight are show traces of diamonds. Some eight small diamonds have been picked in the Sikasso administrative region (southern Mali).



http://www.spyghana.com/the-war-on-mali-what-you-should-know-an-eldorado-of-uranium-gold-petroleum-strategic-minerals/
Image

Conspirator
Online
User avatar
Posts: 7557
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 9:08 am
Location: Next door

PostWed Jan 23, 2013 7:44 am » by Malogg


BUMP but Ima still say a base for running drugs

:cheers:
Image
Blame the rock she has her faults

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 918
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am

PostWed Jan 23, 2013 1:48 pm » by Edgar 2.0


Malogg wrote:BUMP but Ima still say a base for running drugs

:cheers:


Well, yeah, one of the biggest CIA bases is on the Algeria-Mali border.
Drone base, unmarked CIA planes heading for Gitmo refueling, etc.
I guess a lot of drug trafficking is going on as well.

But since drug business is of vital importance for every country in the world...

However, i don't think that's the main reason for fucking up Mali.
Drugs are illegal after all, and a bad PR. :mrgreen:

Uranium, gold and diamonds aren't.
Image

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 332
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:04 am

PostWed Jan 23, 2013 1:59 pm » by flsts1


With the advent of Germany repat'ing her gold from France I wouldn't put it past a nation to invade another for her resources....(not like thats ever happened before :hmmm: )...

I often wonder if the world banking communities that hold eachs others gold have devised a fractional banking system for gold bullion...(think Ft. Knox conspiracy). If this were to be the case, France has some 'splainin' to do....

If this invasion of Mali is driven by the need to "aquire" physical gold to pay back or return gold back to Germany that means there is world wide ponzi....for lack of a better word...scheme...Smoke and Mirrors...Paper...It would appear to me that a vacuum is being created and the world wide financial system is about to implode. Lets just wait and see what happens...

What I find amusing is the issue of what I percieve to be of the crooks not trusting the other crooks in the international banking community :P ...
Try not to become a man of success but a man of value.
Albert Einstein

Conspirator
Online
User avatar
Posts: 7557
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 9:08 am
Location: Next door

PostWed Jan 23, 2013 2:02 pm » by Malogg


Drugs :yell:
Image
Blame the rock she has her faults

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 918
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am

PostTue Jan 29, 2013 1:06 am » by Edgar 2.0


Now, this is an interesting article. I quote it entirely, and hope Thierry won't mind :


"Before our very eyes"

Mali: One war can hide another

by Thierry Meyssan

Voltaire Network | Damascus (Syria) | 23 January 2013

A long time in the making and announced by François Hollande six months in advance, the French intervention in Mali was portrayed as an emergency decision in response to dramatic developments. This scheme aims not only at seizing Mali’s gold and uranium, but more especially at paving the way for the destabilization of Algeria.



Image
Ever since Nicolas Sarkozy with Laurent Gbagbo, Muammar al-Gaddafi and Bashar al-Assad, the Kiss of Judas has been a characteristic of French diplomacy. In the photo, President François Hollande arrives in Algiers on December 10, 2012 to embrace his counterpart Abdelaziz Bouteflika. Three weeks later, he was stoking the flames of war in Mali to set Algeria ablaze.

"Appetite comes with eating", says the proverb. After having re-colonised the Ivory Coast and Libya, then having attempted to get a hold on Syria, France is now setting its sights on Mali in order to take Algeria from behind.

During the attack on Libya, the French and the British made wide use of the Islamists to fight the power structure in Tripoli, since the Cyrenaican separatists had no interest in overthrowing Muammar al-Gaddafi once Benghazi became independent. At the fall of the Jamahiriya, I was personally witness to the reception of the leaders of AQMI (Al Qaida in Islamist Mahgreb) by members of the National Transitional Council in the Hotel Corinthia, which had just been secured by British special forces who had come from Iraq for that purpose. It was clear that the next target for Western colonialism would be Algeria, and that AQMI would play its part, but at that time I could not see which conflict could be used to justify international intervention.

Paris has imagined a scenario in which war will enter Algeria via Mali.

Shortly before NATO’s capture of Tripoli, the French managed to bribe and return the Tuareg groups. They had the time to supply them with abundant funds and weapons, but it was already too late for them to play a role on the ground. Once the war was over, they went back to their desert.

The Tuaregs are a nomad people who live in the central Sahara and on the borders of the Sahel, which is a vast area shared between Libya and Algeria, Mali and Niger. While they have obtained the protection of the first two states, they have been ignored by the last two. As a result, since the 1960’s, they have been challenging the sovereignty of Mali and Niger on their land. Quite logically, these groups, armed by France, have decided to use their weapons to impose their demands on Mali. The MNLA (National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad) has taken control over almost all of northern Mali, where they live. However, a small group of Tuareg Islamists, Ansar Dine, which is connected to AQMI, has taken advantage of this occupation to impose sharia law in some areas.

On the 21st of March 2012, a strange coup d’Etat was perpetrated in Mali. A mysterious group called CNRDRE ( National Commitee for the Recovery of Democracy and the Restoration of the State) overthrew President Amadou Toumani Touré and declared their intention to restore Malian authority in the north of the country. This resulted in great confusion, since the putschists were incapable of explaining how their actions would improve the situation. The overthrow of the President was even stranger since a presidential election was to be held five weeks later and the outgoing President was not running for office. The CNRDRE is composed of officers who were trained in the United States. They halted the election process and handed power to one of their candidates, who happened to be the Francophile Dioncounda Traore. This sleight of hand was legalised by the CEDEAO (Economic Community of West African States), whose President is none other than Alassane Ouattara, who was placed in power in the Ivory Coast by the French army a year earlier.

The coup d’Etat exacerbated ethnic divisions in the country. Elite units of the Malian army (trained in the United States), whose commander is a Tuareg, joined the rebellion, taking with them their arms and equipment.

On the 10th of January, Ansar Dine - supported by other Islamist groups – attacked the town of Konna. It then moves out of Tuareg territory to spread Islamic law to the south of Mali. The transitional President, Dioncounda Traore, declared a state of emergency and called to France for help. Paris intervened within hours to prevent the fall of the capital, Bamako. Far-sightedly, the Elysée had already pre-positioned in Mali troops from the 1st Marine Infantry Parachute Regiment ("the Colonials") and the 13th Parachute Dragoon Regiment, helicopters from the COS (Special Operations Command), three Mirage 2000D’s, two Mirage F-1’s, three C135’s, a C130 Hercules and a C160 Transall.

In reality, it is highly unlikely that Ansar Dine represented any real threat, since the true combative forces are not Islamists, but Tuareg nationalists, who have no ambitions in the south of Mali.

In order to carry out its military intervention, France has turned to a number of countries for support, including Algeria. Alger is trapped – it either has to accept collaboration with an old colonial power, or take the risk of an influx of Islamists on its territory. After some hesitation, it agreed to open its airspace to French aviation. But then a non-identified Islamist group attacked a British Petroleum gas terminal in southern Algeria, accusing Algiers of complicity with Paris in the Malian affair. A hundred people were taken hostage, but they were not only Algerian and French. The aim of this attack is clearly to internationalize the conflict by transporting it to Algeria.

This technique of French intervention is a copy of the one deployed by the Bush administration - use Islamist groups to create conflict, then intervene and occupy the area under the pretence of restoring order. That is why François Hollande’s rhetoric picks up on the "war against terrorism", which has long been abandoned by Washington. The usual cast of actors can be found in this play - Qatar has bought shares in the major French companies installed in Mali, and the emir of Ansar Dine has close ties to Saudi Arabia.

The arsonist-fireman is also a sorcerer’s apprentice. France has decided to reinforce its anti-terrorist measures, the ’Vigipirate plan’. Paris is not afraid of actions by Malian Islamists on French soil, but of the influx of jihadists from Syria. In fact, over the last two years, the DCRI (Central Directorate of Interior Intelligence) has favoured the recruitment of young French Muslims to fight with the Syrian Liberation Army against the Syrian state. Since the SLA is failing, these djihadists are presently returning to their native land, where they may be tempted, out of solidarity with Ansar Dine, to use the terrorist techniques that they have been taught in Syria.



Thierry Meyssan
Image



  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook