New earthquake shakes northern Italy

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PostTue May 29, 2012 10:01 am » by One-23


An earthquake has jolted northern Italy, apparently originating from Emilia, where a quake earlier this month killed seven people and damaged many buildings.

Tuesday's tremor was estimated at 5.8 and was felt in Milan and Bologna, where office workers were evacuated.

The quake struck 40km north of Bologna and 60km east of Parma, at a depth of 9.6km (six miles), according to the US Geological Survey, quoted by Reuters.
Source http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18247659
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PostTue May 29, 2012 10:21 am » by Eis_Leo


True, just heard of it on the radio.

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PostTue May 29, 2012 5:01 pm » by One-23


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PostTue May 29, 2012 5:42 pm » by Flecktarn


Carved up by two major fault lines, Italy has gained a reputation as one of the most earthquake prone countries in Europe.
Close to the point at which two of the world's major tectonic plates meet, its landscape and history have been defined by its geology.
An estimated 20 million people live at risk from earthquakes in the country which is also home to some of the most active volcanoes in Europe.
Small quakes can occur almost anywhere, including Britain. A minor tremor felt in parts of Herefordshire and Worcestershire last year did little more than rattle crockery.
But the most deadly quakes are concentrated on or close to the boundaries between tectonic plates which divide Earth's crust.
Currents in the molten rock under the surface cause plates to move around.

As they converge, one is usually drawn slowly underneath the other but they often slide past each other sideways.
When this happens plates can become stuck, building up pressure over time as they are pushed in separate directions.
Eventually the pressure becomes too much and they move apart violently as an earthquake.
The Eurasian and African plates meet along a line which runs through North Africa and crosses the Mediterranean near southern Italy and Greece.
As a result two main cracks - or fault lines - cut across the Italian peninsula, one running north-south along the spine of the Apennine mountains and another crossing east-west south of Rome and north of Naples.
L'Aquila sits in a valley in the central Apennines north of Rome and is built on a basin of sediments which has attracted geological interest in the past.
It was hit by earthquakes repeatedly in its history including one in 1703 which flattened the centre.
In 2002, 30 people including 27 children were killed when an earthquake destroyed a school in the tiny medieval village of San Giuliano di Puglia in south central Italy.
In November 1980 more than 2,500 people died with 30,000 displaced when a quake hit the Irpiona region near Naples.
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PostTue May 29, 2012 5:44 pm » by Flecktarn


Italy's Mount Etna erupts 5:37PM GMT 18 Mar 2012
Europe's most active volcano, Mount Etna erupted on Sunday sending a four mile-long plume of smoke and ash into the sky.
The eruption is the fourth of its kind this year sending a lava stream into Sicily's uninhabited valley of Valle del Bove.
Etna, which is 11,000ft high and located 18 miles above the Sicilian town of Catania, often erupts but rarely causes damage. 11,000ft high, sits
Nearby airports remained open and continued operations during the eruption athough authorities shut down two nearby flight paths.

i wonder if this was the build up for these quakes
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