NOAA VENTS sounds, Bloop and others

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PostFri Aug 20, 2010 3:30 pm » by Nonlocal


Not sure if this has been discussed before but a quick forum search for Bloop only gave me results where it was mentioned in other threads. I'm sure everyone is familiar with the Bloop, but there are some others aswel.

I was searching one day for the name of the NOAA program that recorded the Bloop. The wiki page of the Bloop mentioned some other sounds aswel. Either I had never read that part or the article has been updated since I visited the wiki entry.

Anyways, if anyone wants to discuss or speculate on the subject;

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustic ... stery.html

I thought Julia and Train to be particulary interesting...
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PostFri Aug 20, 2010 4:48 pm » by Cornbread714


Cool stuff, but I don't know anything about it.

Got any thoughts or other info regarding this?
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PostMon Sep 06, 2010 9:50 pm » by Nonlocal


Sorry for not replying earlier in this thread, but at the time I posted this my thread was beeing "dwarfed" by the "Something is going on at Giza"-thread. I didn't think anyone would reply on this one at that time..

I don't have much other info then found on the VENTS program site though....
But the bloop has been inspiration for SciFy books and hollywood productions, and I think it's overrated compared to some of the other sounds...

Anyways, this thread obviously didn't interest people as much as I hoped.
I'll add some info to the thread nonetheless of the VENTS site for anyone that IS interested but lazy or scared of .gov sites =)

"The Bloop"

This sound was repeatedly recorded during summer, 1997 on the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array. The sound rises rapidly in frequency over about one minute and was of sufficient amplitude to be heard on multiple sensors, at a range of over 5,000 km. It yields a general location near 50oS; 100oW. The origin of the sound is unknown.

Wiki entry on "the Bloop" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloop

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/bloop.wav (Sped up x16)


"Julia"

This sound was recorded on March 1, 1999 on the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array. The source of the sound is unknown, but is sufficiently loud to be heard over the entire array. The duration is approximately 15 seconds and is severely band limited. The approximate origin is 1999JD60 2218Z near 15S, 98W.

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/julia_sound.wav (Sped up x16)


"Train"

This sound was recorded on March 5, 1997 on the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array. The sound rises to a quasi-steady frequency. The origin of the sound is unknown.

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/train.wav(Sped up x16)


"Slowdown"

This sound was recorded May 19, 1997 on the Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array. The sound slowly descends in frequency over about 7 minutes and was of sufficient amplitude to be heard on three sensors at 95W, and 8S, 0, and 8N, at a range of nearly 2,000 km. This type of signal has not been heard before or since. It yields a general location near 15oS; 115oW. The origin of the sound is unknown.

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/noise97139.wav


"Whistle"

This sound was recorded by the autonomous hydrophone deployed at 8oN, 110oW on July 7, 1997 at 0730Z. Origin of the signal is unknown, and it was not detected on any other hydrophone. The band of energy between 1 and 6 Hz represents "strumming" of the mooring in mid-water currents.

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/whistle16x.wav
(This file has been sped up 16 times and band-pass filtered between 8 and 20 Hz to reduce ambient noise.)


And the last one, "Upsweep"

This sound was present when PMEL began recording SOSUS in August, 1991. It consists of a long train of narrow-band upsweeping sounds of several seconds duration each. The source level is high enough to be recorded throughout the Pacific. It appears to be seasonal, generally reaching peaks in spring and fall, but it is unclear whether this is due to changes in the source or seasonal changes in the propagation environment. The source can be roughly located at 54o S, 140oW, near the location of inferred volcanic seismicity, but the origin of the sound is unresolved. The overall source level has been declining since 1991 but the sounds can still be detected on NOAA's equatorial autonomous hydrophone arrays.

Spectrogram:
Image
Wave file:http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/sounds/upsweep20x.wav (Sped up 20x)



For comparison here are also some examples, spectrograms of man-made noises;
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/env-noise/env-noise.html


Also on the Bloop, from a CNN article in 2002;

For years sailors have told tales of monsters of the deep including the huge, many-tentacled kraken that could reach as high as a ship's mainmast and sink the biggest ships. However Phil Lobel, a marine biologist at Boston University, Massachusetts, doubts that giant squid are the source of Bloop. "Cephalopods have no gas-filled sac, so they have no way to make that type of noise," he said. "Though you can never rule anything out completely, I doubt it."

Nevertheless he agrees that the sound is most likely to be biological in origin.

source; http://edition.cnn.com/2002/TECH/science/06/13/bloop/index.html

Back to the wiki article...;

While the audio profile of the bloop does resemble that of a living creature, the source is a mystery both because it is different from known sounds and because it was far too loud: it was several times louder than the loudest known biological sound.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale

*** Oh btw, I've made all the spectrograms smaller so if you want larges ones open them from the site ***

Well thats about it for now :)

Cheers,
“A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it” -Max Planck



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