New clue found to disappearing honey bees

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Expand view Topic review: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Lowsix » Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:36 am

rogerrabbit wrote:
LowSix wrote:I read that the suceptibility to this fungus and particular parasite were a result of letting these bees mix with a modified bee, and that the result was making a honeycomb that was like .5mm smaller than they used to be (or larger, cant remember) due to the differences in the bee breeds, and that this difference in honeycomb size allowed that fungus and parasite to flourish. By either not allowing enough air flow or too much..

Meaning that there was hope if they can get the influx of the organic bees to start mixing back into the population. If i remember correcltly the bad bees came frm commercial farms, where they were modified to increase honey output..

I tried to find the links but cant offhand..


bullshit that smells like to me sorry l6
just not worth thinking about rest your head


And your problem would be what exactly?

Facts bother you?
The fact that I wrote it bother you?
Please enlighten me..Youre a bee expert?
Youve got information to the contrary?

Or you're just talking out of your ass to see some pixels spell your name?

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Rogerrabbit » Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:04 am

LowSix wrote:I read that the suceptibility to this fungus and particular parasite were a result of letting these bees mix with a modified bee, and that the result was making a honeycomb that was like .5mm smaller than they used to be (or larger, cant remember) due to the differences in the bee breeds, and that this difference in honeycomb size allowed that fungus and parasite to flourish. By either not allowing enough air flow or too much..

Meaning that there was hope if they can get the influx of the organic bees to start mixing back into the population. If i remember correcltly the bad bees came frm commercial farms, where they were modified to increase honey output..

I tried to find the links but cant offhand..


bullshit that smells like to me sorry l6
just not worth thinking about rest your head

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Lucidlemondrop » Tue Aug 25, 2009 11:15 pm

seahawk100 wrote:
The sick bees suffered an unusually high number of infections with viruses that attack the ribosomes, the researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported.

"If your ribosome is compromised, then you can't respond to pesticides, you can't respond to fungal infections or bacteria or inadequate nutrition because the ribosome is central to the survival of any organism. You need proteins to survive," May R. Berenbaum, head of the department of entomology at Illinois, said in a statement.



B.A.I.D.S.!!!!


Cute! :dancing:

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Seahawk » Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:26 pm

The sick bees suffered an unusually high number of infections with viruses that attack the ribosomes, the researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported.

"If your ribosome is compromised, then you can't respond to pesticides, you can't respond to fungal infections or bacteria or inadequate nutrition because the ribosome is central to the survival of any organism. You need proteins to survive," May R. Berenbaum, head of the department of entomology at Illinois, said in a statement.



B.A.I.D.S.!!!!

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Lowsix » Tue Aug 25, 2009 9:22 pm

I read that the suceptibility to this fungus and particular parasite were a result of letting these bees mix with a modified bee, and that the result was making a honeycomb that was like .5mm smaller than they used to be (or larger, cant remember) due to the differences in the bee breeds, and that this difference in honeycomb size allowed that fungus and parasite to flourish. By either not allowing enough air flow or too much..

Meaning that there was hope if they can get the influx of the organic bees to start mixing back into the population. If i remember correcltly the bad bees came frm commercial farms, where they were modified to increase honey output..

I tried to find the links but cant offhand..

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Towelie » Tue Aug 25, 2009 9:08 pm

There trying to get people here U.K. to start keeping bees, in bee hives on the roof of there buildings, i saw something on the news a couple of weeks ago about it, apparently bees travel upto 6-7miles so they can be kept even in city centres.

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Rizze » Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:40 pm

towelie wrote:According to Wikipedia :hmmm: , Fluvalinate kills 95% of the mite, although the remaining mite can become immune to it.
Aparently theres a few different measures that can be taken to protect from these mites, id assume, aslong as bee keepers start taking adequate precautions, they should be able to get this under controll.


Good info towelie, thanks for that.
I hope some one benefits from your posting.
Don't know any bee keepers myself, otherwise I would pass this on.
But I assume most of them know this.

It may be those that are opposed to using pesticides, are the root cause, just an assumption of mine.

I guess the trouble starts as the bees move from place to place, they go vast distances I believe.

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Lucidlemondrop » Tue Aug 25, 2009 5:36 pm

What particularly disturbs me about these findings is the inablility to fight off the fungi diseases.

I have mentioned this before but will again..........I am very disturbed by the fact that the ground doesn't seem to ever get dry and much of the areas around my city are like marshes, and mushy. This of course enhances fungus growth and it is sometimes effecting the food products.

Last year my whole neighborhood had the tomatoes rot from the inside before they were even ready to be picked.

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Rogerrabbit » Tue Aug 25, 2009 5:33 pm

savwafair2012 thx for vids ill get to watch them befor bed tonight cheers

bee's ftw!!
like your honey :obsessed:

Re: New clue found to disappearing honey bees

Post by Savwafair2012 » Tue Aug 25, 2009 5:29 pm


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