The History of Human-Powered Flight

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Re: The History of Human-Powered Flight

Post by One-23 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 5:09 pm

:flop: it was your OP that made me decide to post this

Re: The History of Human-Powered Flight

Post by Eldorado » Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:39 pm

Cageyone23 wrote:
In 1980, at the height of this human-powered fervor, the American Helicopter Society announced the Sikorsky Prize - named after helicopter pioneer Igor Sikorsky.


Now, two teams of young engineers are battling for the prize.

Source http://www.npr.org/2012/10/12/159773795 ... t=1&f=1007[/quote]


Make that three teams.......Pedal Power Work Bikes and Georgia Institute of Technology' Capstone Group are working on a design....I should know because I designed the damned thing.... :mrcool:

Introducing Eldorado's latest creation......the B.I.R.D. ...... or Bicycle Integrated Rotorcraft Design

http://www.disclose.tv/forum/human-powered-helicopter-design-by-eldorado-t79272.html

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The History of Human-Powered Flight

Post by One-23 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 3:21 pm

Click on link for interactive Timeline of HPF http://embed.verite.co/timeline/?source ... adjust=2#0

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1485 — 1487
Da Vinci's Ornithopter

In his thirties, Leonardo da Vinci became obsessed with flight: sketches of birds and wings filled the margins of his notebooks. This design for an ornithopter -- a craft that flies by flapping like a bird -- was found in one of his notebooks.


Ever since Leonardo Da Vinci sketched plans for a bird-like machine in one of his notebooks, hundreds of inventors have tried to engineer their way into the skies. But flying under human power — and human power alone — isn't an easy task.

In 1894 Octave Chanute published a volume called "Progress In Flying." A more appropriate title would have been "Lack Of Progress In Flying." The book's detailed list of failed flying machines – from Da Vinci's famous flapping ornithopter to the fins an overconfident French nobleman strapped to his arms and legs – is very humorous. The book's detailed list of injuries suffered by would-be aviators is not.

Many inventors and engineers (including Chanute himself) ignored this book's clear but unstated warning. In a triumph of human will (or obstinacy ... or just plain denial) they kept trying to get off the ground under their own steam. And they kept failing.

Finally, in 1977, men flew. No longer the short hops and unsatisfying glides of previous decades – this was real flight! Super light craft — with human beings huffing and puffing in the cockpit — could bank and turn like real aircraft, cross the English Channel, and race for top speeds.

In 1980, at the height of this human-powered fervor, the American Helicopter Society announced the Sikorsky Prize - named after helicopter pioneer Igor Sikorsky.

It was nearly a decade before a human-powered helicopter – CalPoly's Da Vinci III – even got off the ground. That first flight lasted 8 seconds. Five years later another craft stayed up for 20 seconds, with a maximum height of just 8 inches. For three decades, these were the only attempts. Now, two teams of young engineers are battling for the prize.

Source http://www.npr.org/2012/10/12/159773795 ... t=1&f=1007

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