Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

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Expand view Topic review: Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

Re: Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

Post by Theblackdouglas » Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:57 am

Thanks for that bugmenot" im using bt" myself.

Re: Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

Post by Ph0enix » Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:47 pm

bugmenot wrote:Open Rights Group says BT has made the right decision to not implement Phorm's advertising system. :lol: :lol: http://www.itpro.co.uk/612439/campaigne ... over-phorm

Image

Following yesterday's news that BT has no immediate plans to use Phorm's network scanning behavioural advertising system, its vocal critics stepped up to celebrate.

Phorm's Webwise system has been criticised because it sees everything a user does online, as it scans traffic at a network level using a technology called deep packet inspection (DPI).

Critics of Webwise have included creator of the web Sir Tim Berners Lee, who famously compared the system to having a television camera in your living room, as well as privacy campaigners and websites setup just to protest the company. Phorm responded a few months back by setting up its own website to correct "misconceptions".

Alexander Hanff, of NoDPI, was one of the campaigners targeted by the Phorm website. He wrote: "I read the news and 18 months worth of emotion ran down my cheeks, I was unable to hold back the tears of joy and even now 10 minutes later they continue to fall."

Open Rights Group's Jim Killock - who previously compared Phorm to corporate espionage - welcomed BT's decision and called on other ISPs including Virgin Media and Carphone Warehouse's TalkTalk to "follow their lead."

"This is the right decision for BT and other online providers who respect privacy," he wrote on ORG's site.

But he warned: "Phorm will remain a threat to our fundamental rights while they offer services that intercept communications without the consent of all parties."

Indeed, yesterday Phorm stressed it still has an ongoing trial in Korea and is in talks with ISPs around the world.

and this morning 5 distinguished firms and 7 small startups will be bidding on their abillity to produce identical technology and accomplish the same goal for the company and its shareholders. lots of powepoint presentations for everyoneeeeeeee yayyyyyyyyyyyyyyy :owned:

Re: Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

Post by bugmenot » Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:23 pm

Open Rights Group says BT has made the right decision to not implement Phorm's advertising system. :lol: :lol: http://www.itpro.co.uk/612439/campaigne ... over-phorm

Image

Following yesterday's news that BT has no immediate plans to use Phorm's network scanning behavioural advertising system, its vocal critics stepped up to celebrate.

Phorm's Webwise system has been criticised because it sees everything a user does online, as it scans traffic at a network level using a technology called deep packet inspection (DPI).

Critics of Webwise have included creator of the web Sir Tim Berners Lee, who famously compared the system to having a television camera in your living room, as well as privacy campaigners and websites setup just to protest the company. Phorm responded a few months back by setting up its own website to correct "misconceptions".

Alexander Hanff, of NoDPI, was one of the campaigners targeted by the Phorm website. He wrote: "I read the news and 18 months worth of emotion ran down my cheeks, I was unable to hold back the tears of joy and even now 10 minutes later they continue to fall."

Open Rights Group's Jim Killock - who previously compared Phorm to corporate espionage - welcomed BT's decision and called on other ISPs including Virgin Media and Carphone Warehouse's TalkTalk to "follow their lead."

"This is the right decision for BT and other online providers who respect privacy," he wrote on ORG's site.

But he warned: "Phorm will remain a threat to our fundamental rights while they offer services that intercept communications without the consent of all parties."

Indeed, yesterday Phorm stressed it still has an ongoing trial in Korea and is in talks with ISPs around the world.

Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH)

Post by bugmenot » Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:20 pm

Phorm Share Price Dives After BT Pulls Out (AH AH AH AH) :dancing: :banana: :dancing: :banana: :owned: :owned: http://www.itproportal.com/portal/news/ ... pulls-out/ http://www.techwatch.co.uk/2009/07/07/bt-drops-phorm/


Shares in the contentious online advertising company Phorm have plummeted notably by more than 40 percent after BT notified that it had no “immediate plans” for using the company’s targeted advertising technology.

The advertising firm Phorm has drawn severe criticisms from privacy enthusiasts for creating an online network that connects ISPs, advertisers, as well as online publishers to dish up targeted adverts to the users based on their internet habits.

BT has already been suffering significant losses of late, reporting £1.3 billion in losses for the first quarter of the year after considerable contract write-downs, and thereby the telecom operator asserted that it is focussing hard on developing next generation broadband.

Citing the same, BT said in a statement, “However, given our public commitment to developing next-generation broadband and television services in the UK, we have decided to weigh up the balance of resources devoted to other opportunities”.

Phorm’s controversial technology faced users’ wrath following reports that BT conducted a couple of trials using the company’s technology without asking users’ for their consent back in 2006 and 2007.

After facing troubles in the UK, Phorm said that it is now targeting on its business overseas, and has made noticeable progress in South Korea. “We are engaged in more than 15 markets worldwide, including advanced negotiations with several major internet service providers (ISPs)”, the advertising firm added.

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