BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post a reply

:
In an effort to prevent automatic submissions, we require that you enter both of the words displayed into the text field underneath.
Smilies
:pray: :sleep: :D :alien51: :) :mrgreen: :wink: :love: :obsessed: :| :( :twisted: :evil: :scary: :o :dunno: :? 8-) :hmmm: :shock: :flop: :top: :x :P :oops: :cry: :?: :idea: :arrow: :!: :nails: :look: :rtft: :roll: :ohno: :hell: :vomit: :lol: :think: :headscratch: :clapper: :bang; :censored: :badair: :help: :owned: :nope: :nwo: :geek: :ugeek: :robot: :alien: :mrcool: :ghost: :sunny: :peep: :yell: :banana: :dancing: :hugging: :bullshit: :cheers: :shooting: :hiho:
View more smilies
BBCode is ON
[img] is OFF
[flash] is OFF
[url] is ON
Smilies are ON
Topic review
   

Expand view Topic review: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by Opalserpent » Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:42 am

RATRODROB wrote:
The57ironman wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

RRR

.


...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
http://i.imgur.com/wYu3g8a.gif





Most peeps (non Australian especially) think of kangaroos as being of the eastern grey type, the small cuddly ones, they are common around caravan parks, golf courses and other public places, these guys can be hand fed and even patted but I don't recommend it, they can still lash out unexpectedly, mostly using their front paws causing lacerations and scratches,
Image
these little guys can still do this
Image
A 13-year-old girl suffered a vicious 25-minute attack by two kangaroos while out jogging in the bush in Australia.
Jade Bassett was left bleeding with deep scratches down her legs as well as injuries to her face and arm after confronting the two eastern grey kangaroos in bushland in Oakhampton in the Hunter region of New South Wales.
Her grandfather, Kevin Henderson, had taken her to the track and sat down on a bench to wait for her to return from a 15-minute run.
Bassett had only jogged about 10 metres when she spotted kangaroos, two of which she said were “really big” and one slightly smaller, though still bigger than her.
As she ran towards them they did not move, which Bassett said she found strange, but did not give it much thought as she ran around them.
As she ran past one bounded up beside her and she moved to let it reach the scrub.
“I thought it was weird but I kept running. You usually don’t see them beside you, they usually move away,” she said.
“I kept going and then I heard a really loud, grunting, hissing, sound. It scared the absolute nutter out of me.”
Bassett saw the kangaroo get up on its hind legs and thought to herself “I can’t outrun a kangaroo”, so she ran into the dense scrub next to the path, thinking it would not follow her.
“Then it hit me, I don’t know if it was with its arms, its legs or its tail. I was just on the ground,” she said. “I looked up and thought ‘oh my god, it’s just so big’.”
Bassett said the kangaroo then attacked her with its front paws, scratching her and trying to bite her while baring its teeth and snarling.
“I’ve never heard a noise like it,” she said. “I can’t sleep, every time I close my eyes I hear it in my mind. I hate it.”
Bassett said she tried to push the kangaroo’s face away from her but the movement exposed her face and stomach to the animal as it attacked her, so she lay down and tried to kick as high as she could.
Bassett did not want to scream for her grandfather as she was worried what would happen if it attacked the 71-year-old.
“I copped a lot in the back of thighs, its claws kept sinking into me but I couldn’t feel it at the time,” she said.
“It took me a full day to get up the guts and look at my legs because they felt so wrong. I could put my finger in the grooves where its claws dug into me.”
Bassett picked up a branch and tried to crawl away from the kangaroo back to the track but it followed her and kept pulling her hair, scratching her and kicking her. Bassett then felt something thump her on the back.
She said she looked up and saw a second kangaroo had joined the attack and its face was just inches from her own.
“It was the scariest thing I have ever seen,” she said. “I thought, ‘it’s going to eat my face’.”
“By now I was just screaming I was in so much pain. One was grabbing the back of my hair and pulling me back while the other was pulling me forward. I thought ‘I can’t handle this’ and just started screaming for my pop.”
Bassett said she kept blacking out as the kangaroos continued kicking, clawing and hitting her. Her grandfather ran yelling down the road with a big stick, which scared the kangaroos away.
Bassett got up and ran back down to the track where Henderson was and they were helped by two strangers.
Henderson said he wanted signs put up in the area.
Bassett said she wanted to warn other people that kangaroos might be more aggressive than usual in the area as she did not want it to happen to anyone else. …

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/19/australia-wildlife









But its the REDS who can really do damage, they are big
Image
this is how they use their tails for balance and stance, they could easily empty your stomach using their extremely powerful hind legs.

Image
Image
they are powerful animals, very muscular and you don't want to piss one off.

people don't realise that roos find it VERY difficult to move backwards, this is why I think a lot of unprovoked attacks occur IMO, they easily feel trapped or cornered, but some are just grumpy, they are mostly wild animals and peeps should not forget that.



RRR







Skippy tasted blood, better watch your babies!!!


Sam Murray


Upload to Disclose.tv

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Wed Feb 05, 2014 12:28 am

.



A short doco on BIG CATS Australia, the narrator and the over dramatic music are fckn annoying.



Upload to Disclose.tv





RRR

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Wed Feb 05, 2014 12:14 am

.

footage of a big cat or large feral...........?


Upload to Disclose.tv


38 secs in, look at the length of the tail on this one

RRR

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Tue Feb 04, 2014 11:42 pm

Perronick wrote:Didn't Australia sustain dingos and other mid-sized carnivores? I¡m not even sure the foot claw is of much use when some African herbivores are much better equipped and are common prey for big cats.








Australia has a healthy population of dingoes, im not sure what your question is if any, but I have never seen a carcass of a dingo that has been attacked by a predator, their are just too many easier targets for BIG CATS to go after.

big cats over here as opposed to Africa, probably have better access to farm animals all over Australia, sheep and cattle are every where, yes there are many photos of cattle with huge scratch marks on there hides as a result of being attacked by large predators, BIG CATS are the only animals capable of leaving those types of injuries IMO

RRR

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Tue Feb 04, 2014 11:31 pm

The57ironman wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

RRR

.


...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
http://i.imgur.com/wYu3g8a.gif






Most peeps (non Australian especially) think of kangaroos as being of the eastern grey type, the small cuddly ones, they are common around caravan parks, golf courses and other public places, these guys can be hand fed and even patted but I don't recommend it, they can still lash out unexpectedly, mostly using their front paws causing lacerations and scratches,
Image
these little guys can still do this
Image
A 13-year-old girl suffered a vicious 25-minute attack by two kangaroos while out jogging in the bush in Australia.
Jade Bassett was left bleeding with deep scratches down her legs as well as injuries to her face and arm after confronting the two eastern grey kangaroos in bushland in Oakhampton in the Hunter region of New South Wales.
Her grandfather, Kevin Henderson, had taken her to the track and sat down on a bench to wait for her to return from a 15-minute run.
Bassett had only jogged about 10 metres when she spotted kangaroos, two of which she said were “really big” and one slightly smaller, though still bigger than her.
As she ran towards them they did not move, which Bassett said she found strange, but did not give it much thought as she ran around them.
As she ran past one bounded up beside her and she moved to let it reach the scrub.
“I thought it was weird but I kept running. You usually don’t see them beside you, they usually move away,” she said.
“I kept going and then I heard a really loud, grunting, hissing, sound. It scared the absolute nutter out of me.”
Bassett saw the kangaroo get up on its hind legs and thought to herself “I can’t outrun a kangaroo”, so she ran into the dense scrub next to the path, thinking it would not follow her.
“Then it hit me, I don’t know if it was with its arms, its legs or its tail. I was just on the ground,” she said. “I looked up and thought ‘oh my god, it’s just so big’.”
Bassett said the kangaroo then attacked her with its front paws, scratching her and trying to bite her while baring its teeth and snarling.
“I’ve never heard a noise like it,” she said. “I can’t sleep, every time I close my eyes I hear it in my mind. I hate it.”
Bassett said she tried to push the kangaroo’s face away from her but the movement exposed her face and stomach to the animal as it attacked her, so she lay down and tried to kick as high as she could.
Bassett did not want to scream for her grandfather as she was worried what would happen if it attacked the 71-year-old.
“I copped a lot in the back of thighs, its claws kept sinking into me but I couldn’t feel it at the time,” she said.
“It took me a full day to get up the guts and look at my legs because they felt so wrong. I could put my finger in the grooves where its claws dug into me.”
Bassett picked up a branch and tried to crawl away from the kangaroo back to the track but it followed her and kept pulling her hair, scratching her and kicking her. Bassett then felt something thump her on the back.
She said she looked up and saw a second kangaroo had joined the attack and its face was just inches from her own.
“It was the scariest thing I have ever seen,” she said. “I thought, ‘it’s going to eat my face’.”
“By now I was just screaming I was in so much pain. One was grabbing the back of my hair and pulling me back while the other was pulling me forward. I thought ‘I can’t handle this’ and just started screaming for my pop.”
Bassett said she kept blacking out as the kangaroos continued kicking, clawing and hitting her. Her grandfather ran yelling down the road with a big stick, which scared the kangaroos away.
Bassett got up and ran back down to the track where Henderson was and they were helped by two strangers.
Henderson said he wanted signs put up in the area.
Bassett said she wanted to warn other people that kangaroos might be more aggressive than usual in the area as she did not want it to happen to anyone else. …

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/19/australia-wildlife









But its the REDS who can really do damage, they are big
Image
this is how they use their tails for balance and stance, they could easily empty your stomach using their extremely powerful hind legs.

Image
Image
they are powerful animals, very muscular and you don't want to piss one off.

people don't realise that roos find it VERY difficult to move backwards, this is why I think a lot of unprovoked attacks occur IMO, they easily feel trapped or cornered, but some are just grumpy, they are mostly wild animals and peeps should not forget that.



RRR

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Tue Feb 04, 2014 10:54 pm

DarkHeart wrote:
RATRODROB wrote:.


http://www.australianbigcats.com/2012/11/western-australia-big-cats.html



Myself over the 8 years I was the local Wildlife Officer for Nannup logged a few more than the 64 reports for Thylacines.



Whats the likely hood of the big cats wiping out the remaining Thylacines (aka Tasmanian Tigers) ?

I know they aren't supposed to exist esp on the mainland but there is enough evidence to say they do.


Upload to Disclose.tv









I wouldn't be surprised if a number of thylacines survived somewhere, could even be on the main land, who really knows.......?
My thinkin on weather big cats have or could wipe out the last of the thylacines is no, I don't recon big cats are to blame for the demise of thylacines, I just think that big cats can easily find much more passive and slower targets to pursue in the way of food. there is plenty of sheep and other farm animals to take down and the odd smaller kangaroo.
I suppose if food were a little scarce the big cats would certainly have a go, especially if there were thylacine cubs around, but my way of thinkin is that the big cats would have very little to do with it.



RRR

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by DarkHeart » Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:09 pm

RATRODROB wrote:.


http://www.australianbigcats.com/2012/11/western-australia-big-cats.html



Myself over the 8 years I was the local Wildlife Officer for Nannup logged a few more than the 64 reports for Thylacines.



Whats the likely hood of the big cats wiping out the remaining Thylacines (aka Tasmanian Tigers) ?

I know they aren't supposed to exist esp on the mainland but there is enough evidence to say they do.


Upload to Disclose.tv

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by Thebluecanary » Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:23 pm

The pic at the top looks like a cougar. The body shape, the way the ears are slightly rounded, and the tail…it looks a lot like a North American cougar or mountain lion (same animal, like 10 different names). The one in the middle could be a thalacyne? (I realize I spelled it wrong, and I'm OK with that.) The bottom one looks like a bushy black dog to me. Too stocky in the body and the tail is wrong.

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by The57ironman » Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:02 pm

RATRODROB wrote:Its rare for roos to attack humans but they are wild animals and some are huge, they also have the ability to lean back on their tales and use their hind claws to disembowel.

RRR

.


...omg, i'll pass on pissin' one off.. :peep:
http://i.imgur.com/wYu3g8a.gif

Re: BIG CATS ..............Australia

Post by RATRODROB » Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:21 pm

Perronick wrote:Or an Asian Golden Cat:

The Asian golden cat is heavily built, with a typical cat-like appearance. It has a head-body length of 66 to 105 cm (26 to 41 in), with a tail 40 to 57 cm (16 to 22 in) long, and is 56 cm (22 in) at the shoulder. The weight ranges from 9 to 16 kg (20 to 35 lb), which is about two or three times the size of a domesticated cat.[2]

The pelage is uniform in color, but highly variable ranging from red to golden brown, dark brown to pale cinnamon, gray to black.


Asian golden cats can climb trees when necessary. They hunt birds, large rodents and reptiles, small ungulates such as muntjacs and young sambar deer.[5] They are capable of bringing down prey much larger than themselves, such as domestic water buffalo calves.[21] In the mountains of Sikkim, they reportedly prey on ghoral.[22]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_golden_cat








Your input is valued Perronick, it really is baffling as to what these big cats all over Australia in fact are and how they got here, maybe they have been here longer than we think.
I don't know what my sister and myself witnessed that day, but it was BIG


RRR

Top

Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook