Riots shake Tunisia and Algeria

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PostTue Jan 11, 2011 5:15 am » by Proto


Fresh rioting breaks out in Algerian capital Algiers

The riots are widely seen as drawing on deep frustrations with the ruling elite and a lack of political freedom, as well as more immediate concerns about the cost of living, housing, and jobs.

Police repression of mass protests in Tunisia and Algeria last week has led to the deaths of over a dozen people, with hundreds injured. There was rioting against food price increases and state subsidy cuts across Algeria, amid ongoing demonstrations in Tunisia against unemployment and the regime of Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

After reports of sporadic rioting throughout the country, there was large-scale rioting in Algeria’s major cities at the end of last week.

Squads of riot police set up roadblocks and attacked protestors in the Belcourt and Bab el-Oued districts of Algiers on Friday. Protestors sacked police stations, banks, or government offices in “several eastern cities” including Constantine, Jijel, Setif, and Bouira, according to Algeria’s official APS news agency. AFP also reported violent clashes in Oran, Algeria’s second-largest city, Annaba, and Tizi Ouzou—the main city of the ethnic-minority Kabylie region.

The BBC wrote that 14 people were killed in two cities, Kasserine and Tala. Tunisia’s official TAP news agency released a statement saying: “Several government buildings in Kasserine were attacked by groups who set fire to and destroyed three banks, a police station, and a filling station, and set fire to a police vehicle.” Four people were reported killed in Regueb.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12134307

Protests in Algeria and Tunisia have captured the interest of bloggers in both countries. Social media seem to be playing a central role in the coverage of the unfolding events in a context of heavy censorship and strict restrictions imposed on traditional media (mostly state-run) and on the Internet. Here is an overview of what has been said in the local blogosphere in the last couple of days.

In Tunisia

As soon as news emerged about troops using live ammunition and firing at unarmed protesters, netizens started actively seeking information on the number of the dead. The conversation on Twitter and social networks was absorbed by conflicting figures about the number of the victims.

Unsurprisingly, the Tunisian state-run TV7 didn't seem to be concerned about the unfolding drama as Nawaat (@nawaat), the independent news website, writes:

"The national TV broadcaster is airing a music concert while the police fires live bullets at protesters " .

full article:

http://globalvoicesonline.org/2011/01/1 ... televised/

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PostTue Jan 11, 2011 5:51 am » by Proto


Intifada and Riots in Tunisia and Algeria


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PostSat Jan 15, 2011 4:09 am » by Proto


Jordan Joins The Food Protests As Tunisian President Steps Down

Jordanians have taken to the streets of the capital Amman to vent their anger at the government’s inability to stem rising food prices

riots in Tunisia and Algeria sparked by high food prices, and now Jordan joins the list. Thousands of people have taken to the streets in protest against the growing food prices, unemployment and are calling on the prime minister Samir Rifai to stand down. The protest follow an announcement earlier this week by the Jordanian government that $169m will be invested in reducing the price of food and fuel as well as creating jobs. However, protesters say that this isn’t enough and they want more to be done to tackle poverty induced by inflation. According to a report by Al Jazeera, demonstrators were seen holding banner reading ‘Jordan is not only for the rich. Bread is a red line. Beware of our starvation and fury’.

In the latest development in Tunisia, it has been reported that another protester has been shot dead and an American journalist wounded by police gunfire. The Tunisian president Ben Ali announced that he would not seek re-election in 2014 and that fresh legislative elections will be called in six months time. However, a state of emergency has since been called and Al Jazeera is now reporting that the president has left the country and the army has taken control.

These riots have been sparked by high food prices- as well as political unrest- which have been influenced in part by various factors including a poor harvest worldwide and climate change.

A recent report by FOA found that the global average price of food are at their highest since 2008, when sky rocketing food prices toppled at least one government and pushed more than one billion people into hunger. Whilst the previous food crisis in 2008 did see rioting in the MENA region, the implications were nowhere as serious as they have been this time around.

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PostSat Jan 15, 2011 7:21 pm » by Proto


Tunisians' Rage Drives Ben Ali From Power After 23 Years

TUNIS, Tunisia — Violent anti-government protests drove Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from power Friday after 23 years of iron-fisted rule, as anger over soaring unemployment and corruption spilled into the streets.

Thousands of demonstrators from all walks of life mobbed the capital of Tunis to demand Ben Ali's ouster, the culmination of weeks of protests that have swept the country. Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi went on state television to announce that he is assuming power in this North African nation known for its sandy beaches and ancient ruins.

The shake-up is certain to have repercussions in the Arab world and beyond — as a sign that massive public outrage could bring down a leader as entrenched and powerful as Ben Ali.

The president tried vainly to hold onto power amid Friday's riots, declaring a state of emergency, dissolving the government and promising new legislative elections within six months. A day earlier, he had promised not to run for re-election in 2014 and also slashed prices on key foods such as sugar, bread and milk.

Yet Friday saw the largest demonstrations in generations. Police repeatedly clashed with protesters, some of whom climbed the walls of the dreaded Interior Ministry, site of torture reports for years. Clouds of tear gas and black smoke hung over the city's whitewashed buildings, and tour operators hurriedly evacuated thousands of tourists.

Hours later, the airport was closed and unconfirmed news reports citing unidentified government sources said Ben Ali had left the country.

"I take over the responsibilities temporarily of the leadership of the country at this difficult time to help return security," Ghannouchi said in a solemn statement. "I promise that when I take this responsibility, to respect the Constitution and work on reform of economic and social issues with care and to consult with all the sides."

The 74-year-old leader came to power in a bloodless coup in 1987, taking over from a man called formally President-for-Life. Ben Ali seized power from Habib Bourguiba, the founder of modern-day Tunisia who set the Muslim country on a pro-Western course after independence from France in 1956.

Ben Ali removed Bourguiba from office for "incompetence," saying he had become too old, senile and sick to rule. Ben Ali promised then that his leadership would "open the horizons to a truly democratic and evolved political life."

But after a brief period of reforms early on, Tunisia's political evolution stopped.

A U.S. diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks called Tunisia a "police state" and said Ben Ali has lost touch with his people.

Those people rioted strongly in Mammamet Thursday, which long has been a favorite getaway for Ben Ali and his large extended family, many of whom have built vast beachfront mansions here with the wealth they have amassed during his years in power, The New York Times reports.

But their new and conspicuous riches, partly exposed in the WikiLeaks-released cable, have fueled an extraordinary extended uprising by Tunisians who blame corruption among the elite for the joblessness afflicting their country.

And on Thursday, idyllic Hammamet became the latest casualty of that rage, as hundreds of protesters swarmed the streets, the police fled and rioters gleefully ransacked the mansion of a presidential relative, liberating a horse from its stable and setting aflame a pair of all-terrain vehicles.

That outburst was just a chapter in the deadly violence that flared around the country and in Tunis, the capital, again on Thursday, making the government appear increasingly shaky. The mounting protests threaten not only to overturn a close United States ally in the fight against terrorism but also to pull back the veneer of tranquil stability that draws legions of Western tourists to Tunisia’s coastal resorts.

http://www.newsmaxworld.com/global_talk ... 71262.html

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PostSat Jan 15, 2011 7:37 pm » by zinzana


whenever i hear the name Tunisia i'm thinking couscous man ...

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PostSat Jan 15, 2011 7:42 pm » by Smallworld


proto wrote:Tunisians' Rage Drives Ben Ali From Power After 23 Years

TUNIS, Tunisia — Violent anti-government protests drove Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from power Friday after 23 years of iron-fisted rule, as anger over soaring unemployment and corruption spilled into the streets.

Thousands of demonstrators from all walks of life mobbed the capital of Tunis to demand Ben Ali's ouster, the culmination of weeks of protests that have swept the country. Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi went on state television to announce that he is assuming power in this North African nation known for its sandy beaches and ancient ruins.

The shake-up is certain to have repercussions in the Arab world and beyond — as a sign that massive public outrage could bring down a leader as entrenched and powerful as Ben Ali.

The president tried vainly to hold onto power amid Friday's riots, declaring a state of emergency, dissolving the government and promising new legislative elections within six months. A day earlier, he had promised not to run for re-election in 2014 and also slashed prices on key foods such as sugar, bread and milk.

Yet Friday saw the largest demonstrations in generations. Police repeatedly clashed with protesters, some of whom climbed the walls of the dreaded Interior Ministry, site of torture reports for years. Clouds of tear gas and black smoke hung over the city's whitewashed buildings, and tour operators hurriedly evacuated thousands of tourists.

Hours later, the airport was closed and unconfirmed news reports citing unidentified government sources said Ben Ali had left the country.

"I take over the responsibilities temporarily of the leadership of the country at this difficult time to help return security," Ghannouchi said in a solemn statement. "I promise that when I take this responsibility, to respect the Constitution and work on reform of economic and social issues with care and to consult with all the sides."

The 74-year-old leader came to power in a bloodless coup in 1987, taking over from a man called formally President-for-Life. Ben Ali seized power from Habib Bourguiba, the founder of modern-day Tunisia who set the Muslim country on a pro-Western course after independence from France in 1956.

Ben Ali removed Bourguiba from office for "incompetence," saying he had become too old, senile and sick to rule. Ben Ali promised then that his leadership would "open the horizons to a truly democratic and evolved political life."

But after a brief period of reforms early on, Tunisia's political evolution stopped.

A U.S. diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks called Tunisia a "police state" and said Ben Ali has lost touch with his people.

Those people rioted strongly in Mammamet Thursday, which long has been a favorite getaway for Ben Ali and his large extended family, many of whom have built vast beachfront mansions here with the wealth they have amassed during his years in power, The New York Times reports.

But their new and conspicuous riches, partly exposed in the WikiLeaks-released cable, have fueled an extraordinary extended uprising by Tunisians who blame corruption among the elite for the joblessness afflicting their country.

And on Thursday, idyllic Hammamet became the latest casualty of that rage, as hundreds of protesters swarmed the streets, the police fled and rioters gleefully ransacked the mansion of a presidential relative, liberating a horse from its stable and setting aflame a pair of all-terrain vehicles.

That outburst was just a chapter in the deadly violence that flared around the country and in Tunis, the capital, again on Thursday, making the government appear increasingly shaky. The mounting protests threaten not only to overturn a close United States ally in the fight against terrorism but also to pull back the veneer of tranquil stability that draws legions of Western tourists to Tunisia’s coastal resorts.

http://www.newsmaxworld.com/global_talk ... 71262.html






democracy=peoples power,this is a good exemple to the world leader, who`s the boss .





vivre la démocratie! :shooting: :shooting: :shooting:

vivre la révolution! :shooting: :shooting: :shooting:



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