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PostWed May 02, 2012 12:55 am » by Iamthatiam


Spectacular Galaxy Site of Massive Black Hole Eruption

Image

An extraordinary outburst from a black hole -- where its X-ray output increased at least 3,000 times -- has been seen with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the galaxy M83. Chandra observed what is called a ULX, or ultraluminous X-ray source. Nicknamed the Southern Pinwheel, M83 is undergoing more rapid star formation than our own Milky Way galaxy, especially in its nucleus. The image above shows hundreds of young star clusters, ancient swarms of globular star clusters, and hundreds of thousands of individual stars, mostly blue supergiants and red supergiants.
An extraordinary outburst produced by a black hole in a nearby galaxy has provided direct evidence for a population of old, volatile stellar black holes. The discovery, made by astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, provides new insight into the nature of a mysterious class of black holes that can produce as much energy in X-rays as a million suns radiate at all wavelengths.

Researchers used Chandra to discover a new ultraluminous X-ray source, or ULX. These objects give off more X-rays than most binary systems, in which a companion star orbits the remains of a collapsed star. These collapsed stars form either a dense core called a neutron star or a black hole. The extra X-ray emission suggests ULXs contain black holes that might be much more massive than the ones found elsewhere in our galaxy.

The companion stars to ULXs, when identified, are usually young, massive stars, implying their black holes are also young. The latest research, however, provides direct evidence that ULXs can contain much older black holes and some sources may have been misidentified as young ones.

The intriguing new ULX is located in M83, a spiral galaxy about 15 million light years from Earth, discovered in 2010 with Chandra. Astronomers compared this data with Chandra images from 2000 and 2001, which showed the source had increased in X-ray brightness by at least 3,000 times and has since become the brightest X-ray source in M83.

Chandra observations that spanned several years, the ULX in M83 increased in X-ray brightness by at least 3,000 times. This sudden brightening is one of the largest changes in X-rays ever seen for this type of object, which do not usually show dormant periods. This can be seen in the difference between the top left and top right panels of the image below. The bottom two panels show changes in optical during that time.

The sudden brightening of the M83 ULX is one of the largest changes in X-rays ever seen for this type of object, which do not usually show dormant periods. No sign of the ULX was found in historical X-ray images made with Einstein Observatory in 1980, ROSAT in 1994, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton in 2003 and 2008, or NASA's Swift observatory in 2005.

"The flaring up of this ULX took us by surprise and was a sure sign we had discovered something new about the way black holes grow," said Roberto Soria of Curtin University in Australia, who led the new study. The dramatic jump in X-ray brightness, according to the researchers, likely occurred because of a sudden increase in the amount of material falling into the black hole.

In 2011, Soria and his colleagues used optical images from the Gemini Observatory and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to discover a bright blue source at the position of the X-ray source. The object had not been previously observed in a Magellan Telescope image taken in April 2009 or a Hubble image obtained in August 2009.

The lack of a blue source in the earlier images indicates the black hole's companion star is fainter, redder and has a much lower mass than most of the companions that previously have been directly linked to ULXs. The bright, blue optical emission seen in 2011 must have been caused by a dramatic accumulation of more material from the companion star.

"If the ULX only had been observed during its peak of X-ray emission in 2010, the system easily could have been mistaken for a black hole with a massive, much younger stellar companion, about 10 to 20 million years old," said co-author William Blair of Johns Hopkins University.

The companion to the black hole in M83 is likely a red giant star at least 500 million years old, with a mass less than four times the sun's. Theoretical models for the evolution of stars suggest the black hole should be almost as old as its companion.

Another ULX containing a volatile, old black hole recently was discovered in the Andromeda galaxy by Amanpreet Kaur, from Clemson University, and colleagues and published in the February 2012 issue of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Matthew Middleton and colleagues from the University of Durham reported more information in the March 2012 issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. They used data from Chandra, XMM-Newton and HST to show the ULX is highly variable and its companion is an old, red star.

"With these two objects, it's becoming clear there are two classes of ULX, one containing young, persistently growing black holes and the other containing old black holes that grow erratically," said Kip Kuntz, a co-author of the new M83 paper, also of Johns Hopkins University. "We were very fortunate to observe the M83 object at just the right time to make the before and after comparison."

A paper describing these results will appear in the May 10th issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

In the image below the panel on the left features an optical view of the full M83 galaxy, while the right panel shows a close up of the region where the ULX was found with data from Chandra (pink) and Hubble (blue and yellow). The remarkable behavior of this ULX in M83 provides direct evidence for a population of older, volatile, stellar-mass black holes.

Image

Provided by Chandra X-ray Center

Image credit: Credit: Credit: Left image - Optical: ESO/VLT; Close-up - X-ray: NASA/CXC/Curtin University/R. Soria et al., Optical: NASA/STScI/Middlebury College/F. Winkler et al.

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PostWed May 02, 2012 8:23 pm » by Iamthatiam


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PostThu May 03, 2012 10:56 am » by Constabul


@IAM :cheers:

The last story is the most recent.

Fossil Reveals 48-Million-Year History of Zombie Ants
ScienceDaily (Aug. 18, 2010) —A 48-million-year-old fossilised leaf has revealed the oldest known evidence of a macabre part of nature -- parasites taking control of their hosts to turn them into zombies.
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This is the 48-million-year-old fossil leaf from Messel which bears the tell-tale death grip scars. (Credit: Torsten Wappler)

The discovery has been made by a research team led by Dr David P Hughes, from the University of Exeter, who studies parasites that can take over the minds of their hosts.

All manner of animals are susceptible to the often deadly body invasion, but scientists have been trying to track down when and where such parasites evolved.

Dr Hughes, from the University's School of Biosciences, said: "There are various techniques, called a molecular clock approach, which we can use to estimate where and when they developed and fossils are an important source of information to calibrate such clocks.

"This leaf shows clear signs of one well documented form of zombie-parasite, a fungus which infects ants and then manipulates their behaviour."

The fungus, called Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, causes ants to leave their colonies and head for a leaf which provides the ideal conditions for the host to reproduce.

When it gets there the ant goes into a 'death grip'- biting down very hard on the major vein of a leaf. This means that when the ant dies, its body stays put so the fungus has time to grow and release its spores to infect other ants.

The death grip bite leaves a very distinct scar on the leaves. This prompted Dr Hughes, together with research partners Conrad Labandeira from the Smithsonian Institution in the USA and Torsten Wappler, from the Steinmann Institute in Germany, to search for potential evidence of the fungus at work by studying the fossilised remains of leaves.

After studying leaf fossils from the Messel Pit, a site on the eastern side of the Rhine Rift Valley in Hesse, Germany, they found clear evidence of the death grip bite in a 48-million-year-old leaf specimen.

Dr Hughes said: "The evidence we found mirrors very closely the type of leaf scars that we find today, showing that the parasite has been working in the same way for a very long time.

"This is, as far as we know, the oldest evidence of parasites manipulating the behaviour of their hosts and it shows this parasitic association with ants is relatively ancient and not a recent development.

"Hopefully we can now find more fossilised evidence of parasitic manipulation. This will help us shed further light on the origins of this association so we can get a better idea of how it has evolved and spread."

The paper, title Ancient death-grip leaf scars reveal ant-fungal parasitism, is published in the latest edition of Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 105730.htm

Zombie Ants Have Fungus On the Brain, New Research Reveals
ScienceDaily (May 9, 2011) —New research has revealed how infection by a parasitic fungus dramatically changes the behavior of tropical of carpenter ants (species Camponotus leonardi), causing them to become zombie-like and to die at a spot that has optimal reproduction conditions for the fungus. The multinational research team studied ants living high up in the rainforest canopy in Thailand.
Image
This is a dead carpenter ant attached to a leaf in the understory of a Thai forest. Before killing the ant, the fungus growing from ant's head changed the ant's behavior, causing it to bite into the leaf vein. (Credit: David Hughes, Penn State University)

A paper describing the research will be published in the BioMed Central open-access journal BMC Ecology on 9 May 2011.

"The behavior of these infected zombie ants essentially causes their bodies to become an extension of the fungus's own phenotype, as non-infected ants never behave in this way," said David P. Hughes, the first author of the research paper and an assistant professor of entomology and biology at Penn State University.

Using transmission-electron and light microscopes, the researchers were able to look inside the ant in order to determine the effect of the fungus on the ant. They found that the growing fungus fills the ant's body and head, causing muscles to atrophy and forcing muscle fibres to spread apart. The fungus also affects the ant's central nervous system. The scientists observed that, while normal worker ants rarely left the trail, zombie ants walked in a random manner, unable to find their way home. The ants also suffered convulsions, which caused them to fall to the ground. Once on the ground, the ants were unable to find their way back to the canopy and remained at the lower, leafy understory area which, at about 9 or 10 inches (25 cm) above the soil, was cooler and moister than the canopy, provided ideal conditions for the fungus to thrive.

The scientists found that at solar noon, when the Sun is at its strongest, the fungus synchronised ant behavior, forcing infected ants to bite the main vein on the underside of a leaf. The multiplying fungal cells in the ant's head cause fibres within the muscles that open and close the ant's mandibles to become detached, causing "lock jaw," which makes an infected ant unable to release the leaf, even after death. A few days later, the fungus grows through the ant's head a fruiting body, a stroma, which releases spores to be picked up by another wandering ant.

"The fungus attacks the ants on two fronts: first by using the ant as a walking food source, and second by damaging muscle and the ant's central nervous system," Hughes said. "The result for the ant is zombie walking and the death bite, which place the ant in the cool, damp understory. Together these events provide the perfect environment for fungal growth and reproduction."

Hughes said his continuing research at Penn State is designed to learn how the fungus might be used to control pest insects in homes and farms.

In addition to Hughes, other members of the research team include Sandra Andersen and Jacobus J Boomsma in Denmark, Nigel L Hywel-Jones and Winanda Himaman in Thailand, and Johan Billen in Belgium. This research was funded by a Marie Curie Individual Fellowship to David Hughes.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 065536.htm



Zombie-Ant Fungus Is Under Attack, Research Reveals
ScienceDaily (May 2, 2012) —A parasite that fights the zombie-ant fungus has yielded some of its secrets to an international research team led by Penn State's David Hughes. The research reveals, for the first time, how an entire ant colony is able to survive infestations by the zombie-ant fungus, which invades an ant's brain and causes it to march to its death at a mass grave near the ant colony, where the fungus spores erupt out of the ant's head. "In a case where biology is stranger than fiction, the parasite of the zombie-ant fungus is itself a fungus -- a hyperparasitic fungus that specializes in attacking the parasite that turns the ants into zombies," Hughes said.

Image
A parasite that fights the zombie-ant fungus has yielded some of its secrets to an international research team led by David Hughes of Penn State University. The research reveals, for the first time, how an entire ant colony is able to survive infestations by the zombie-ant fungus, which invades an ant's brain and causes it to march to its death at a mass grave near the ant colony, where the fungus spores erupt out of the ant's head. This photo shows a zombie ant with the brain-manipulating fungus (Ophiocordyceps unilateralis s.l.) having been castrated by an hyperparasite fungus (white with yellow material). (Credit: David Hughes, Penn State University)

The research will be published in the journal PLoS ONE.

"The hyperparasitic fungus effectively castrates the zombie-ant fungus so it cannot spread its spores," said Hughes, who is an assistant professor of entomology and biology, and a member of the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics at Penn State. "Because the hyperparasitic fungi prevents the infected zombie-ant fungus from spreading spores, fewer of the ants will become zombies."

As part of their research, the scientists created a detailed model that revealed previously unknown details of the interactions between the fungus-infected ants and the parasite-infected zombie-ant fungus. Scientists previously had known that ants defend their colonies against microscopic enemies such as fungal spores by efficiently grooming each other. In this study, the researchers also modeled the effect of ant behavior on limiting infection. "Interestingly, beyond the well known effect of defensive ant behavior, our new research reveals the added effect of the castrating actions of the hyperparasite fungi, which may result in significantly limiting the spread of the zombie-ant fungus" Hughes said.

The scientists report that only about 6.5 percent of the spore-producing organs of the zombie-ant fungus were viable. "Even though there are a lot of dead and infected zombie ants in the neighborhood, only a few of the spores of the zombie-ant fungus will become mature and able to infect healthy ants," Hughes said. "Our research indicates that the danger to the ant colony is much smaller than the high density of zombie-ant cadavers in the graveyard might suggest. This complex interaction between ant colonies, their brain-manipulating parasites, and other fungi capable of lending assistance to the colony underscores the need to study social insects under natural conditions." Hughes said his team is expanding its efforts and "remains focused on following the exciting theatre played out on the rainforest floor."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 184708.htm
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PostThu May 03, 2012 12:33 pm » by Iamthatiam


Const, im linking here this finding, which i credit to Jet17's...

http://www.khanacademy.org/

About the zombie ants, Im in a hurry by now, going to work...Will get back to ya later, and tell something crazy about it...You can count on that!! :D


:cheers:
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PostFri May 04, 2012 9:38 am » by Constabul


Iamthatiam wrote:Const, im linking here this finding, which i credit to Jet17's...

http://www.khanacademy.org/

About the zombie ants, Im in a hurry by now, going to work...Will get back to ya later, and tell something crazy about it...You can count on that!! :D


:cheers:


Got it bookmarked,
:cheers: look forward to it.

Speaking of zombification too, Here are a couple older articles, good tho.

Was looking into other subjects dealing with electromagnetic field, and the relation to the body, and its fields and found this.


Moral judgments can be altered ... by magnets
By disrupting brain activity in a particular region, neuroscientists can sway people’s views of moral situations.
Anne Trafton, MIT News Office
March 30, 2010
To make moral judgments about other people, we often need to infer their intentions — an ability known as “theory of mind.” For example, if one hunter shoots another while on a hunting trip, we need to know what the shooter was thinking: Was he secretly jealous, or did he mistake his fellow hunter for an animal?

MIT neuroscientists have now shown they can influence those judgments by interfering with activity in a specific brain region — a finding that helps reveal how the brain constructs morality.


Image
MRI brain scans showing the location of the right temporoparietal junction (blue circle). The purple triangle shows a nearby region that the researchers disrupted with magnetic stimulation as a control experiment.
Images courtesy Rebecca Saxe laboratory, MIT


MIT neuroscientists have now shown they can influence those judgments by interfering with activity in a specific brain region — a finding that helps reveal how the brain constructs morality.

Previous studies have shown that a brain region known as the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) is highly active when we think about other people’s intentions, thoughts and beliefs. In the new study, the researchers disrupted activity in the right TPJ by inducing a current in the brain using a magnetic field applied to the scalp. They found that the subjects’ ability to make moral judgments that require an understanding of other people’s intentions — for example, a failed murder attempt — was impaired.

The researchers, led by Rebecca Saxe, MIT assistant professor of brain and cognitive sciences, report their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of March 29. Funding for the research came from The National Center for Research Resources, the MIND Institute, the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, the Simons Foundation and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation.

The study offers “striking evidence” that the right TPJ, located at the brain’s surface above and behind the right ear, is critical for making moral judgments, says Liane Young, lead author of the paper. It’s also startling, since under normal circumstances people are very confident and consistent in these kinds of moral judgments, says Young, a postdoctoral associate in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

“You think of morality as being a really high-level behavior,” she says. “To be able to apply (a magnetic field) to a specific brain region and change people’s moral judgments is really astonishing.”

Thinking of others

Saxe first identified the right TPJ’s role in theory of mind a decade ago — a discovery that was the subject of her MIT PhD thesis in 2003. Since then, she has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that the right TPJ is active when people are asked to make judgments that require thinking about other people’s intentions.

In the new study, the researchers wanted to go beyond fMRI experiments to observe what would happen if they could actually disrupt activity in the right TPJ. Their success marks a major step forward for the field of moral neuroscience, says Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, professor of philosophy at Duke University.

“Recent fMRI studies of moral judgment find fascinating correlations, but Young et al usher in a new era by moving beyond correlation to causation,” says Sinnott-Armstrong, who was not involved in this research.

The researchers used a noninvasive technique known as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to selectively interfere with brain activity in the right TPJ. A magnetic field applied to a small area of the skull creates weak electric currents that impede nearby brain cells’ ability to fire normally, but the effect is only temporary.

In one experiment, volunteers were exposed to TMS for 25 minutes before taking a test in which they read a series of scenarios and made moral judgments of characters’ actions on a scale of one (absolutely forbidden) to seven (absolutely permissible).

In a second experiment, TMS was applied in 500-milisecond bursts at the moment when the subject was asked to make a moral judgment. For example, subjects were asked to judge how permissible it is for a man to let his girlfriend walk across a bridge he knows to be unsafe, even if she ends up making it across safely. In such cases, a judgment based solely on the outcome would hold the perpetrator morally blameless, even though it appears he intended to do harm.

In both experiments, the researchers found that when the right TPJ was disrupted, subjects were more likely to judge failed attempts to harm as morally permissible. Therefore, the researchers believe that TMS interfered with subjects’ ability to interpret others’ intentions, forcing them to rely more on outcome information to make their judgments.

“It doesn’t completely reverse people’s moral judgments, it just biases them,” says Saxe.

When subjects received TMS to a brain region near the right TPJ, their judgments were nearly identical to those of people who received no TMS at all.

While understanding other people’s intentions is critical to judging them, it is just one piece of the puzzle. We also take into account the person’s desires, previous record and any external constraints, guided by our own concepts of loyalty, fairness and integrity, says Saxe.

“Our moral judgments are not the result of a single process, even though they feel like one uniform thing,” she says. “It’s actually a hodgepodge of competing and conflicting judgments, all of which get jumbled into what we call moral judgment.”

Saxe’s lab is now studying the role of theory of mind in judging situations where the attempted harm was not a physical threat. The researchers are also doing a study on the role of the right TPJ in judgments of people who are morally lucky or unlucky. For example, a drunk driver who hits and kills a pedestrian is unlucky, compared to an equally drunk driver who makes it home safely, but the unlucky homicidal driver tends to be judged more morally blameworthy.

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/mora ... -0330.html


There are additional links at the article site.




Quantum force gets repulsive

Casimir–Lifshitz effect could help nanoengineers out of a sticky situation.


A strange quantum force could be used to make tiny machine parts levitate in frictionless nanomachines of the future.

The Casimir effect describes the attraction that occurs between two parallel, uncharged metal plates held very close together in a vacuum. It has been a curiosity of quantum physics since it was postulated 60 years ago by Hendrik Casimir, a Dutch physicist.


Image

Now, Federico Capasso of Harvard University and his co-workers have measured a repulsive version of the force, which Capasso says could allow tiny machines to be made so that their moving parts do not touch.

The force that Casimir predicted is a quantum effect caused by the constant fluctuations in the electromagnetic field between and around the two plates.

The wavelengths of the photons that make up the electromagnetic field are affected by the distance between the two plates, particularly when these are only a few nanometres apart. This makes the electromagnetic field between the plates different from that surrounding them. As the system tries to overcome this imbalance, the plates are squeezed together.

In the 1950s and 1960s, the Russian physicist Evgeny Lifshitz extended Casimir's theory to include real metals, rather than theoretical 'ideal' metals, and dielectric materials — those that are electrically insulating but that can still support an electromagnetic field. Lifshitz predicted that these forces could be repulsive as well as attractive. His name was added to what is now known as the Casimir–Lifshitz force.

So far, only attractive forces have been probed in detail, mostly out of curiosity. But as nanoengineered machines become more popular, the Casimir–Lifshitz effect has begun to cause problems because it causes tiny pieces to stick together. Capasso says that as engineered devices continue to get smaller and smaller, these quantum forces need to be taken seriously.

As tiny components get closer to each other, nanoengineers either have to avoid these interactions to prevent parts getting stuck together — or they could use the Casimir effect to their advantage, he says.
Useful repulsion

Casimir's original theoretical design and Capasso's group's experiment are different. Capasso's team replaced the vacuum with a liquid, bromobenzene, and, instead of metal plates, used a gold-coated polystyrene sphere attached to a cantilever, and a silica plate.

The key to the experiment is the dielectric permittivity of each of these materials. This property represents a material's ability to carry an electric field. To get a repulsive force out of the system, the dielectric permittivity of one plate must be higher than that of the surrounding liquid, and the dielectric permittivity of the second plate must be lower than that of the surrounding liquid. "We're talking about a repulsion that is controlled by the ordering of the dielectric properties of the materials, not the shape," says Capasso.

In the set-up used by Capasso's group, gold has the highest dielectric permittivity, followed by bromobenzene, followed by silica. The Casimir-Lifshitz force works so that the liquid is attracted into the gap between the two, forcing them apart.

Capasso used the cantilever attached to the gold-coated sphere to measure the size of the repulsive force. A change in a beam of light reflected off the top of the cantilever signalled movement in the system, and revealed that as the gold sphere was brought close to the silica plate it got pushed back. The results are published in Nature1.

The effect occurs only at separations of less than about 120 nanometres. The researchers found the force to be strongest — around 150 trillionths of a newton — when the gold and silica were about 20 nanometres apart.

"This paper is a milestone in experiments on Casimir forces and quantum fluctuations," says physicist Ho Bun Chan at the University of Florida in Gainsville, who works on microelectromechanical systems.

Steve Lamoreaux of Yale University was one of the first to accurately measure the attractive Casimir–Lifshitz force, and is impressed by Capasso and colleagues' experiment. The Casimir–Lifshitz force has become a "bit of a nuisance" for nanomachines, Lamoreaux says, and harnessing the repulsive force may provide a solution, stopping tiny clean surfaces from sticking together.

Chan adds that the approach would be particularly useful "if future research can demonstrate repulsive forces with a liquid that is more user-friendly than bromobenzene."

The next step is to use the phenomenon to levitate a tiny piece of gold, or other material, in the liquid. "The levitation experiment should be straightforward," says Capasso, and, if so, could be exploited in tiny machines within 10 years. "I have a hunch that something useful will come out of this," he adds.

http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090107/ ... 009.4.html

:cheers:
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PostFri May 04, 2012 2:07 pm » by Iamthatiam


This info about these 'zombie Ants' is amazingly scary, my friend, and triggers debates surrounding wild speculations, based on a category of understanding provenient of the old knowledge, which im trying to concatenate with various modern Physiological studies....This is where you get into the equation!

I will give you here, the two dots, the rest Im sure you will figure...As wild concept as it gets, put under the purely empirical prisma, it makes a lot of sense to me, and with your help, this could make a lot more...

Here it goes...The first article is already copied by me inside an old thread, I can't remember if it is the very exact same article, but pretty much covers the same subject...


NASA Finds New Life (Updated)

NASA has discovered a new life form, a bacteria called GFAJ-1 that is unlike anything currently living in planet Earth. It's capable of using arsenic to build its DNA, RNA, proteins, and cell membranes. This changes everything. Updated.

NASA is saying that this is "life as we do not know it". The reason is that all life on Earth is made of six components: Carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. Every being, from the smallest amoeba to the largest whale, share the same life stream. Our DNA blocks are all the same.

That was true until today. In a surprising revelation, NASA scientist Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team have found a bacteria whose DNA is completely alien to what we know today, working differently than the rest of the organisms in the planet. Instead of using phosphorus, the newly discovered microorganism—called GFAJ-1 and found in Mono Lake, California—uses the poisonous arsenic for its building blocks. Arsenic is an element poisonous to every other living creature in the planet except for a few specialized microscopic creatures.

Image
The new life forms up close, at five micrometers.

According to Wolfe-Simon, they knew that "some microbes can breathe arsenic, but what we've found is a microbe doing something new—building parts of itself out of arsenic." The implications of this discovery are enormous to our understanding of life itself and the possibility of finding organisms in other planets that don't have to be like planet Earth. Like NASA's Ed Weiler says: "The definition of life has just expanded."

Watch the vid, here :arrow: Here's the organism and a computer simulation on how it substitutes phosphorus for arsenic in its DNA

Talking at the NASA conference, Wolfe-Simon said that the important thing in their study is that this breaks our ideas on how life can be created and grow, pointing out that scientists will now be looking for new types of organisms and metabolism that not only uses arsenic, but other elements as well. She says that she's working on a few possibilities herself.

NASA's geobiologist Pamela Conrad thinks that the discovery is huge and "phenomenal," comparing it to the Star Trek episode in which the Enterprise crew finds Horta, a silicon-based alien life form that can't be detected with tricorders because it wasn't carbon-based. It's like saying that we may be looking for new life in the wrong places with the wrong methods. Indeed, NASA tweeted that this discovery "will change how we search for life elsewhere in the Universe."

Image
Mono Lake, in Central California. Image Credit: NASA

I don't know about you but I've not been so excited about bacteria since my STD tests came back clean. And that's without counting yesterday's announcement on the discovery of a massive number of red dwarf stars, which may harbor a trillion Earths, dramatically increasing our chances of finding extraterrestrial life.


Here is the subject, I hope you to put it under perspective, because it is said by the old initiatic schools, humans have this 'Gland' inside them brains, +/- the size of a small sand grain, called 'Pineal Gland', and the most curious about this, is that it might perfectly be a silicate based component of the human brain. Going even further, one could say that this 'Bio-microchip' could perfectly be the legendary (And so called) 'Philosopher's Stone', well known by you, Im sure!

Now, I want you to put this possibility, under the discovery of the previously mentioned article!!!

Scary theory, aye? :shock:

Depending on youre reactions, I will elaborate more what I think! :mrgreen:

:cheers:
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PostFri May 04, 2012 2:15 pm » by Chillitiger


Iamthatiam wrote:This info about these 'zombie Ants' is amazingly scary, my friend, and triggers debates surrounding wild speculations, based on a category of understanding provenient of the old knowledge, which im trying to concatenate with various modern Physiological studies....This is where you get into the equation!

I will give you here, the two dots, the rest Im sure you will figure...As wild concept as it gets, put under the purely empirical prisma, it makes a lot of sense to me, and with your help, this could make a lot more...

Here it goes...The first article is already copied by me inside an old thread, I can't remember if it is the very exact same article, but pretty much covers the same subject...


NASA Finds New Life (Updated)

NASA has discovered a new life form, a bacteria called GFAJ-1 that is unlike anything currently living in planet Earth. It's capable of using arsenic to build its DNA, RNA, proteins, and cell membranes. This changes everything. Updated.

NASA is saying that this is "life as we do not know it". The reason is that all life on Earth is made of six components: Carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. Every being, from the smallest amoeba to the largest whale, share the same life stream. Our DNA blocks are all the same.

That was true until today. In a surprising revelation, NASA scientist Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team have found a bacteria whose DNA is completely alien to what we know today, working differently than the rest of the organisms in the planet. Instead of using phosphorus, the newly discovered microorganism—called GFAJ-1 and found in Mono Lake, California—uses the poisonous arsenic for its building blocks. Arsenic is an element poisonous to every other living creature in the planet except for a few specialized microscopic creatures.

Image
The new life forms up close, at five micrometers.

According to Wolfe-Simon, they knew that "some microbes can breathe arsenic, but what we've found is a microbe doing something new—building parts of itself out of arsenic." The implications of this discovery are enormous to our understanding of life itself and the possibility of finding organisms in other planets that don't have to be like planet Earth. Like NASA's Ed Weiler says: "The definition of life has just expanded."

Watch the vid, here :arrow: Here's the organism and a computer simulation on how it substitutes phosphorus for arsenic in its DNA

Talking at the NASA conference, Wolfe-Simon said that the important thing in their study is that this breaks our ideas on how life can be created and grow, pointing out that scientists will now be looking for new types of organisms and metabolism that not only uses arsenic, but other elements as well. She says that she's working on a few possibilities herself.

NASA's geobiologist Pamela Conrad thinks that the discovery is huge and "phenomenal," comparing it to the Star Trek episode in which the Enterprise crew finds Horta, a silicon-based alien life form that can't be detected with tricorders because it wasn't carbon-based. It's like saying that we may be looking for new life in the wrong places with the wrong methods. Indeed, NASA tweeted that this discovery "will change how we search for life elsewhere in the Universe."

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Mono Lake, in Central California. Image Credit: NASA

I don't know about you but I've not been so excited about bacteria since my STD tests came back clean. And that's without counting yesterday's announcement on the discovery of a massive number of red dwarf stars, which may harbor a trillion Earths, dramatically increasing our chances of finding extraterrestrial life.


Here is the subject, I hope you to put it under perspective, because it is said by the old initiatic schools, humans have this 'Gland' inside them brains, +/- the size of a small sand grain, called 'Pineal Gland', and the most curious about this, is that it might perfectly be a silicate based component of the human brain. Going even further, one could say that this 'Bio-microchip' could perfectly be the legendary (And so called) 'Philosopher's Stone', well known by you, Im sure!

Now, I want you to put this possibility, under the discovery of the previously mentioned article!!!

Scary theory, aye? :shock:

Depending on youre reactions, I will elaborate more what I think! :mrgreen:

:cheers:



Thats all well and good, but what does it mean for my Fantasy Footy?! :mrgreen:
Yes i'll admit it.... I think Max Keiser is a LEGEND

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PostFri May 04, 2012 2:19 pm » by Iamthatiam


Sorry, Chillitiger...I will have to wait for Costabul's feedback, on this one...Then I get back to ya, and you will be free to use the concept, without any kind of authorshit rights, deal? :D
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PostFri May 04, 2012 2:36 pm » by Chillitiger


Iamthatiam wrote:Sorry, Chillitiger...I will have to wait for Costabul's feedback, on this one...Then I get back to ya, and you will be free to use the concept, without any kind of authorshit rights, deal? :D


Haha. Sounds good. I had heard about these ants before, very fascinating. Reminds me of all those old Doctor Who's I used to watch.
As for the arsenic building blocks. My only thought is and always has been, it is presumptuous to think that all life would be "as we know it". I am sure most people here have also come to that conclusion.
I enjoy biology but I am not "all over it" as it sounds you yourself are.
Does it have any real implications?
Yes life is diverse, and it seems very tenacious in its ability to exist. This is great.
I suppose for the closed minded scientists it may open their minds to other possibilities of life in the universe and it may push the agenda to find ET life. That would be a good thing.... Maybe
Feeling a little melancholy on the whole science thing. And that is nothing against these posts. I have been avoiding this thread cause I know i will be trapped here for hours.
But there is so much politics and personal pride involved that we only get to see some of the great ideas!
Not to mention greed.
Be nice when we share our ideas openly and freely without any bias. I will always dream! :wink:

The red wine is kicking in so I take no responsibility for any posts from here on in! :lol: :lol:
Yes i'll admit it.... I think Max Keiser is a LEGEND

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PostFri May 04, 2012 2:41 pm » by Iamthatiam


Chillitiger wrote:
Iamthatiam wrote:Sorry, Chillitiger...I will have to wait for Costabul's feedback, on this one...Then I get back to ya, and you will be free to use the concept, without any kind of authorshit rights, deal? :D


Haha. Sounds good. I had heard about these ants before, very fascinating. Reminds me of all those old Doctor Who's I used to watch.
As for the arsenic building blocks. My only thought is and always has been, it is presumptuous to think that all life would be "as we know it". I am sure most people here have also come to that conclusion.
I enjoy biology but I am not "all over it" as it sounds you yourself are.
Does it have any real implications?
Yes life is diverse, and it seems very tenacious in its ability to exist. This is great.
I suppose for the closed minded scientists it may open their minds to other possibilities of life in the universe and it may push the agenda to find ET life. That would be a good thing.... Maybe
Feeling a little melancholy on the whole science thing. And that is nothing against these posts. I have been avoiding this thread cause I know i will be trapped here for hours.
But there is so much politics and personal pride involved that we only get to see some of the great ideas!
Not to mention greed.
Be nice when we share our ideas openly and freely without any bias. I will always dream! :wink:

The red wine is kicking in so I take no responsibility for any posts from here on in! :lol: :lol:


LOL...

You know, I had this feeling you were a great add to this board, from day one we crossed paths here..Looks like I was right!! :flop:

:cheers:
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"The Heaven's Lights are fed by the energy generated inside the furnaces of Hell; I AM One Conductive Wire! "


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