Sense means, roughly spoken, following the verb form

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PostTue Sep 28, 2010 3:07 am » by Tertiusgaudens


What is sense? Is there sense?

Language has given us nice tools to find the sense path.

A noun is an expression of a thing, a process, an occurence. It is a nomen thus naming things, objects, persons. Refresh your memories in grammar.

A verb is a do - word, it conveys action or being.

Now think.

Verbs transmit life into a sentence. Saying: I go to work! is a noun sentence - clear and informative. Now say: I go working! - that is more living for there is used a verb form.

It was a german thinker in 18th century who said that verbs rather than nouns transmit life into texts - Johann Gottfried Herder.

To make it short: the sense thing is also related to the verb.

What is the sense of work? Working!
Of love? Loving!
Of breath? Breathing!
Of sleep? Sleeping!

It was Heidegger who once said: The world is worlding. Inventing a verb form for world was his way describing the way it goes. The world is worlding. The table is tabeling. The wool is wooling. etc. pp.

So what's the sense of life? Of course living...
Hope is the thing with feathers...
Emily Dickinson

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PostTue Sep 28, 2010 3:15 am » by sockpuppet


You may be fascinated to know that in some languages from the northwest coast of the US up along the Pacific DON'T HAVE NOUNS, because nouns literally are the "being" of verbs.

(and to refresh your grammar dear Tertius,

The subject - predicate - object structure is clearly an I pattern: I (subject) love (predicate) the dog (object).


.. is incorrect. That is a SVO (subject-verb-object) pattern. The predicate in a SVO sentence is everything except the subject aka, starting with the verb. The only time only the verb is a predicate is in a Form I sentence, which has no object ie He runs. )
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PostTue Sep 28, 2010 3:41 am » by Tertiusgaudens


A predicate must contain a verb and modifies a subject - that is the sense of a predicate.

My sentence you have quoted - an SPO pattern - is pointing to the new role of subjects in developing language.

I have learned ancient greek. Bruno Snell - I mentioned him to you - showed us a changing in sentence structures starting from Homer. The subject - and this I meant with I pattern - became more immanent in sentences. A result is in modern languages the SPO pattern as most simple and valid sentence pattern. The discovery of I thus became visible in using new grammatical structures. SPO is the most important till today.
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PostTue Sep 28, 2010 3:44 am » by sockpuppet


Ok, I'm gonna have to read the book because I fail to see how this is universally valid.
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PostThu Sep 30, 2010 2:42 am » by Tertiusgaudens


Grammer use explains - as we have seen - the meaning of sense by shifting the noun into the verb form. This is the function of a verb - essential unfolding of a "naming particle" called noun or substantive.

Here is another example of how grammar reflects existential questions and answers.

The words "dead" and "alive" are in fact adjectives. These are words which describe features and characteristics.

A grammatical form of adjectives is called comparison - we can determine the comparative as well as the superlative: big - bigger - biggest, small - smaller - smallest etc. pp.

Try it with dead or alive. It won't go! Both adjectives have no comparative and superlative!

The reason is simple. There is no graduation in both dead and alive. Dead is dead - no graduation. Alive is alive - same situation. Dead and alive pointing at totality - all or nothing. Nothing in between - no half dead or quarter alive - all or nothing.

Dead and alive are immediate and nongradual experiences - no levels in between. That means totality of experiences without something which could be done or has to be done.

We have shown here another example of how grammar can help understanding life processes...
Hope is the thing with feathers...
Emily Dickinson



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