Stonehenge and the Monolith Was Arthur C. Clarke Right?

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PostWed Jul 22, 2009 11:49 pm » by Blacky


badger wrote:Image
that's the uffington white horse, the oldest in the country. Bit out the way as it's in Oxfordshire. Isn't that up your way Brill?


Just using that as an example!
we managed to see 2 or 3 white horses Avebury and stonehenge all in 1 day! it was a drive from where i live but well worth it!
Recomend it to anyone!!
:cheers:
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PostWed Jul 22, 2009 11:52 pm » by brillbilly


its great if you like mysteries and megaliths but to kids its a building site lol ,i will get some of photos of west kennet i took give me 30 lol :headscratch: :dancing:Image

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PostThu Jul 23, 2009 12:35 am » by Blacky


:flop:
is that a burial site then brillbilly??
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PostThu Jul 23, 2009 12:52 am » by brillbilly


blacky wrote::flop:
is that a burial site then brillbilly??

yes mate, nice and fat and heavy lol :flop: :cheers:

brillbilly

PostThu Jul 23, 2009 1:00 am » by brillbilly


Image Stonehenge was constructed in a series of phases over many centuries, and its appearance changed significantly. With each change, its acoustic qualities would also have been transformed. While it is difficult to reconstruct the acoustics from these earlier times, it is possible to study final form of the monument as it stands (dating to between 2500 and 1600 BC). Research here is further complicated because many stones have fallen, or been removed altogether.

Developed in collaboration with acoustician Dr. David Keating, the acoustic tests at Stonehenge were intended to test the most fundamental properties of the monument. A omni-directional loudspeaker was placed at the centre of the large stone circle, and a series of measurements taken along a straight line leading from the centre towards the Heel Stone and Avenue.

Overall, the results suggested that the stones at Stonehenge are able to contain and amplify higher frequency sounds, such as the human voice. In contrast, lower frequency sounds such as drums pass around these sarsens and can be heard for some distance. This means that most sounds made in the centre are not clearly transmitted beyond the rings of stone.

Almost all of the stones at Stonehenge have been artificially shaped. It was noted during the research that the inner surfaces of many stones were dressed to be either flat or concave. This is not visually striking, but could improve the ability of these stones to reflect sound. In contrast, the outward facing surfaces of the same stones are irregular or even convex. The enormous effort invested in dressing sarsens and bluestones into these subtle and barely visible shapes is difficult to explain, but it might suggest that the builders of the monument knew how to emphasise the movement of sound.

It is possible that the contrasting acoustic experiences between the inside and outside of Stonehenge in some ways excluded people from activities at the centre. An audience outside the monument could not have clearly seen or heard events within, perhaps creating a sense of mystery. In contrast, an audience occupying the confined interior of Stonehenge would have heard amplified sounds. It is even possible to generate standing waves, as sound reflects between the enormous stones.

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PostThu Jul 23, 2009 1:24 am » by Crunchy


i remember going to stonehenge as a teenager, however i did not find the place a positive experience .... stonehenge was fenced off by that time and it was inaccessible
but a stone that was/is (road works since) right by the road made me feel absolute dread and evil ... thats the best i can describe it .... i did not want to stay
i am not religeous and never have been but the memory of it is still strong over 20 years later
very weird :?

brillbilly

PostThu Jul 23, 2009 1:27 am » by brillbilly


crunchy wrote:i remember going to stonehenge as a teenager, however i did not find the place a positive experience .... stonehenge was fenced off by that time and it was inaccessible
but a stone that was/is (road works since) right by the road made me feel absolute dread and evil ... thats the best i can describe it .... i did not want to stay
i am not religeous and never have been but the memory of it is still strong over 20 years later
very weird :?

hi crunchy,i like avebury better than stonehenge as you can touch the stones in avebury :flop:

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PostThu Jul 23, 2009 1:52 am » by -Marduk-


The Day Arthur C. Clarke Died


Arthur C. Clarke, a visionary science fiction writer who won worldwide acclaim with more than 100 books on space, science and the future, died on Wednesday. He was 90. (March 19 2008)
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-= PREDESTINATION: Itz hard to be ze good guy when you turn into a fucking gun =-


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