Tattoos silicon-and-silk implantable devices RFID chips

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 1634
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:31 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:32 am » by Dirttyrabbit


The Illustrated Man: How LED Tattoos Could Make Your Skin a Screen
click here to see video
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/11/ ... -humanity/



The title character of Ray Bradbury’s book The Illustrated Man is covered with moving, shifting tattoos. If you look at them, they will tell you a story.

New LED tattoos from the University of Pennsylvania could make the Illustrated Man real (minus the creepy stories, of course). Researchers there are developing silicon-and-silk implantable devices which sit under the skin like a tattoo. Already implanted into mice, these tattoos could carry LEDs, turning your skin into a screen.

The silk substrate onto which the chips are mounted eventually dissolves away inside the body, leaving just the electronics behind. The silicon chips are around the length of a small grain of rice — about 1 millimeter, and just 250 nanometers thick. The sheet of silk will keep them in place, molding to the shape of the skin when saline solution is added.

These displays could be hooked up to any kind of electronic device, also inside the body. Medical uses are being explored, from blood-sugar sensors that show their readouts on the skin itself to neurodevices that tie into the body’s nervous system — hooking chips to particular nerves to control a prosthetic hand, for example.

Chips are already used inside bodies, most notably the tiny RFID tags injected into pets. But the flexible nature of these “tattooed” circuits means they can move elastically with the body, sitting in places that a rigid circuit board couldn’t.

The first displays are sure to be primitive, but likely very useful for the patients that receive them. You won’t be getting the full-color, hi-res images that come with ink, but functional displays. This doesn’t mean that the commercial and artistic possibilities are being ignored. Philips, the electronics giant, is exploring some rather sexual uses:

click here to see video
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/11/ ... -humanity/
.

Super Moderator
User avatar
Posts: 6029
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:53 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:35 am » by Vulcanic


I saw that this morning thats really cool. i would get it if i could afford it.
:flop: :flop:
Image

My YouTube Channel :

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPmp_ByJdC5zkBQQmCr7EUw


Upload to Disclose.tv


Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 1634
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:31 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:35 am » by Dirttyrabbit


.

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 1634
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:31 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:43 am » by Dirttyrabbit


Image

Silicon LEDs can act as photonic tattoos that can show blood-sugar readings
http://hplusmagazine.com/articles/enhanced/tattoo-you
Animated and programmable LED tattoos connected to your brain? You could show off your latest Flash animations, watch TV on your arm, or have a built-in PDA screen. The possibilities are endless. Perhaps more than simply a fashion statement, you could use such LED tattoos to display medical information about your body such as blood-sugar readings. A recent article in MIT Technology Review describes a new type of super-thin silicon transistor that can be embedded on a dissolvable silk-based film and can do all of that.
Brian Litt, associate professor of neurology and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, is working with researchers from Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois and Tufts University to develop medical applications for the new transistors. Their silk-silicon LEDs can act as photonic tattoos that can show blood-sugar readings, as well as arrays of conformable electrodes that might interface with the nervous system.

Professor Litt’s laboratory is a collaboration between Neurology, Neurosurgery, Neuroscience, and Engineering. While epilepsy is the lab’s core focus, other research includes implantable neurodevices, functional neurosurgery, network and computational neuroscience, movement disorders, intra-operative and ICU monitoring, major mental illness, and other brain network disorders.
When the Rolling Stones released Tattoo You in 1981, they had little notion that in a few short years tattoos would become more than the mark of bikers, sailors, and criminals or a fashion statement for hardcore hipsters and flashy rock stars. Tattoos would soon become commonplace among middle-aged housewives and business executives. Today, companies no less prestigious than Royal Philips Electronics of the Netherlands are exploring the potential for electronic tattoos as personal body adornment and self representation. Here’s a rather sensuous video from Philips that shows the human body as a platform for electronics and interactive skin technology:

Professor Litt’s silk-based transistors promise more than just personal adornment or even medical LED tattoos. Arrays of silk electrodes for applications such as deep-brain stimulation –- used to control Parkinson’s symptoms –- can be overlaid to conform precisely to the surface of the brain’s crevice structure to reach otherwise inaccessible regions. And the electrodes can be wrapped around individual peripheral nerves to help control prostheses. So far, these flexible devices have been implanted on mice without harm (The silk degrades over time).

Image

The researchers summarized their experiments in a recent paper, “Silicon electronics on silk as a path to bioresorbable, implantable devices,” published in Applied Physics Letters. The silicon takes the form of nanomembranes built onto water soluble and biocompatible silk substrates. And while electronics must usually be encased to protect them from the body, these electronics don't need protection. The silk allows the electronics to match the contours of biological tissue. When wetted with saline, the devices conform to tissue surface. The silicon devices are about one millimeter long and 250 nanometers thick. They are manufactured on a stamp and then transferred to the surface of a thin film of silk. The silk holds each device in place, even after the array is implanted.

Tattooing in the Western world has its origins in Polynesia –- the first recorded encounter with the Tahitian tatau occurred during the 1769 expedition of Captain James Cook, the famed British Naval explorer. The Polynesian practice quickly became popular among European sailors, before spreading more widely. Cook’s infamous first officer William Bligh led a subsequent expedition to Tahiti in 1789 in search of breadfruit. Of the 25 mutineers aboard Bligh’s boat, HMS Bounty, court records show that twenty one had tattoos from their time in Tahiti. A century later, the royal princes, Albert and George, would visit tattooists first in Japan, then Jerusalem, while serving in the Royal Navy. The staid Cook and Bligh likely disapproved of this exotic body ornamentation at the time. Nor could they -- or the royalty that later adopted the fashion -- possibly envision that it might one day result in photonic LED tattoos connected to the brain.
.

Initiate
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2008 12:32 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:53 am » by lainn


why we choose this road....because of the promise that it will make life easier...this is recipe to a conditioning that will eventually call for complete assimilation by means of infusing technology to our very beings....just feels as if there is a huge risk here...we haven't even figured out ourselves completely and in a few questionable decades of technologies evelution we have allowed it to sync and somewhat surpass our own....but i suppose if we use this responsibly and not allow it to fall into the intent of our darker endevorers...it could be useful...then again....

Master Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 10861
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 12:36 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 8:59 am » by Lowsix


or maybe its simply advancing the field of art into new frontiers.
Image
warløckmitbladderinfection wrote:blasphemous new gehenna inhabitant makes god sad...

Initiate
Posts: 939
Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2008 12:32 am

PostMon Nov 23, 2009 9:18 am » by lainn


LowSix wrote:or maybe its simply advancing the field of art into new frontiers.


surely.....but the fact that the application can be used for other intents such as control by means of constant montoring leaves this on a border line of caustion for me at the moment....i would want to believe in the advancement of the art into new frontiers...but we just haven't proven just how responsible we can be with such applications...just how irresponsible so far(IMO)...and perception....but who knows right.



  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook