The Ancient Ruins Of South Africa - Adamscalendar Mystery!

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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 8:49 pm » by whitedeath


Grrrrr Kingz!!! wtf dude? :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :censored: :censored: :censored: :censored:






You are personally responsible for me losing the next few nights due to going through every piece you've posted here!

I hope you're happy!
Very irresponsible. Making a good , clear and well thought out post which is something of interest to us.
:cheers:

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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 8:56 pm » by Kingz


whitedeath wrote:Grrrrr Kingz!!! wtf dude? :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :hell: :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :bang; :censored: :censored: :censored: :censored:






You are personally responsible for me losing the next few nights due to going through every piece you've posted here!

I hope you're happy!
Very irresponsible. Making a good , clear and well thought out post which is something of interest to us.
:cheers:


8-) Lol I hope I won't ruin any valuable time of yours with it, hehehe

And uhm... thanks I guess.... :oops: I love it when people are also fascinated by these things... History is something so intriguing to me, it's really hard to explain the mysteriousness behind it... And I guess a lot of people share that same common sense :D

:hugging:
The Map Is Not The Territory, The Word Is Not The Object....
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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 9:08 pm » by Gary19702


Kingz, this post is the shit!!
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This is the stuff that keeps me on this site for hours on end, you just raised the bar too high for alot of us here, well thought out, concise, and just plain bad ass! excellent work
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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 11:04 pm » by Kingz


gary19702 wrote:Kingz, this post is the shit!!
This is the stuff that keeps me on this site for hours on end, you just raised the bar too high for alot of us here, well thought out, concise, and just plain bad ass! excellent work


heheh guys thanks.... but please don't flatter me like that :oops: I'm glad some of you like the stuff I post... although I mostly do it for myself because I like this, and it gives me a option to store my findings in one thread... instead of several loose ones ;) That said, I really hope this website won't go offline or shutdown for some reason.... at least not before I make backup of all my posts hahaha :geek: And dude..... That picture was hilarious wahahahh :twisted:


Anyway, back to buisness ;) I found a website a while back were these pictures were on... and when making this topic I reminded myself about these pics. They have some of the same style sturctures, only these ruins are in England (or perhaps my imagination is running to wild heheh) :peep:

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Chysauster Iron Age Village - Cornwall, England
Chysauster was an Iron Age village inhabited from about 100 BC to sometime in the 3rd century AD. It was probably built by members of the Dumnonii tribe of Cornish Britons. The village is composed of eight courtyard houses, laid out in two rows of four. Outside the main grouping of houses is another stone house, and there are the remains of several outlying buildings in the surrounding fields.

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Each of the main houses is similar in layout. The building is oriented on an east-west axis, which the entrance in the east. The east-west diameter is approximately 90 feet. A passage leads from the entrance to an inner courtyard of about 25 feet diameter. On the far side of the couryard is a small circular room with chambers radiating out from it. Rooms for storage and living were built into the walls, which are as thick as 14 feet in places.

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In some of the houses there is evidence of covered stone drains. A quern for grinding grain can be seen at the site, as can a collapsed fougou, or underground tunnel. The inhabitants of Chysauster survived by farming and livestock raising. Evidence of field enclosures show where the herds were prevented from getting at food crops.

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http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/ ... auster.htm

Ofcourse rich old white men took over and ruined some of the archeological works in that area.... against the will of archeologists and citizens of Cornwall! > Read here from Wiki >

Controversy over the site

The fogou nearby was filled in by English Heritage in the 1980s in an attempt to prevent it from caving in, a move which was unpopular with the local community. In the 1990s, archaeologist Craig Weatherhill questioned the then head of English Heritage, Lord Montagu, about the agency's treatment of the fogou. Lord Montagu defended his organisation and Weatherhill was not satisfied.

It should be noted that English Heritage was not the only modern agency to affect the Chysauster site; negligent reinstatement work in the wake of earlier excavations resulted in the incorrect placement of some stone walls.

In 1999 there was some further controversy regarding this site and others under the care of the English Heritage organisation. Members of a pressure group, the Revived Cornish Stannary Parliament, removed several signs bearing the English Heritage name.[2][3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chysauster_Ancient_Village



NEXT POST WILL BE ABOUT AFRICA AGAIN :sunny:
The Map Is Not The Territory, The Word Is Not The Object....
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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 11:09 pm » by Anuki


:flop:

dont know if/.when i am gonna read it all but wanted you to know
i admire youre effort!!!

;)

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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 11:10 pm » by Kingz


anuki wrote::flop:

dont know if/.when i am gonna read it all but wanted you to know
i admire youre effort!!!

;)

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king anu

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:flop:
I hope you will enjoy and participate in the thread, and my tip is too listen at least the first few parts from the * Coast to Coast broadcast that Kris 75 posted > It is well worth it when going on into some of these subjects. [/b]

* http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p ... 6EDCC93FD6


African Ruins and The Anunaki... what more do you want... Thy almight King Anu.. 8-)
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PostTue Apr 13, 2010 11:16 pm » by Anuki


Indeed Kingz!

Totaly agree ;)

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PostWed Apr 14, 2010 12:25 am » by Kingz


NEXT POST WILL BE ABOUT AFRICA AGAIN :sunny:



I re-take that last quote, since I came across an old thread of mine... I knew I posted it a while ago... I tried too find it last time, but we all know the search engine can be a pain in the butt sometimes heheh ;)

Anyway, this thread was really significant in my opinion... because this in my opinion again adds value to the theory of Gold > Check out this post and best is again to have some background information... which again was provided by someone on Coast To Coast, here is the first part about The Lost City Of Z (the rest of th thread is connected, just read and you will know why


Upload to Disclose.tv


Start at 7.20 min. if you don't want to waste any time... it only takes about 30min. / 45 min.


HERE ARE MY PREVIOUS POSTS ABOUT THE AMAZONIAN RUINS:


"Lost" Amazon Complex Found; Shapes Seen by Satellite
John Roach
for National Geographic News
January 4, 2010


Hundreds of circles, squares, and other geometric shapes once hidden by forest hint at a previously unknown ancient society that flourished in the Amazon, a new study says.

Satellite images of the upper Amazon Basin taken since 1999 have revealed more than 200 geometric earthworks spanning a distance greater than 155 miles (250 kilometers).

Now researchers estimate that nearly ten times as many such structures—of unknown purpose—may exist undetected under the Amazon's forest cover.

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The crop circles of Santa Teresinha, Brazil, are seen in an undated photograph.

At least one of the sites has been dated to around A.D. 1283, although others may date as far back as A.D. 200 to 300, said study co-author Denise Schaan, an anthropologist at the Federal University of Pará in Belém, Brazil.

The discovery adds to evidence that the hinterlands of the Amazon once teemed with complex societies, which were largely wiped out by diseases brought to South America by European colonists in the 15th and 16th centuries, Schaan said.

Since these vanished societies had gone unrecorded, previous research had suggested that soils in the upper Amazon were too poor to support the extensive agriculture needed for such large, permanent settlements.

"We found that this picture is wrong," Schaan said. "And there is a lot more to discover in these places."

Wide-reaching Culture
The newfound shapes are created by a series of trenches about 36 feet (11 meters) wide and several feet deep, with adjacent banks up to 3 feet (1 meter) tall. Straight roads connect many of the earthworks.

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Preliminary excavations at one of the sites in 2008 revealed that some of the earthworks were surrounded by low mounds containing domestic ceramics, charcoal, grinding-stone fragments, and other evidence of habitation. But who built the structures and what functions they served remains a mystery. Ideas range from defensive buildings to ceremonial centers and homes, the study authors say.

It's also possible the structures served different purposes over time, noted William Woods, a geographer and anthropologist at the University of Kansas in Lawrence who was not involved in the research.

"For example," he said, "in Lawrence there's a Masonic temple—it is now a bar. There was a bank—it is now a restaurant called Tellers. These things happen."

What most surprised the research team is that the earthworks appear in both the region's floodplains and the uplands. In general, the Amazon's fertile floodplains have been popular sites for ancient civilizations, while the sparser uplands have been thought to be largely devoid of people, the researchers say.

What's more, the earthworks in both regions are of a similar style, suggesting they were built by the same society.

"In Amazonian archaeology you always have this idea that you find different peoples in different ecosystems," study co-author Schaan said.

"And so it was kind of odd to have a culture that would take advantage of different ecosystems and expand over such a large region."

"Astounding" Population
The uplands sites appear to have been home to as many as 60,000 people, Schaan and her colleagues suggest in their paper, published this month in the journal Antiquity. That figure is based on estimates of the social organization and labor that would have been required to build the structures hinted at by the remaining earthworks.

According to the University of Kansas' Woods, the population estimate is reasonable, albeit rough, since so little is known about these complexes.

Answers may emerge as researchers continue to excavate the newfound shapes in the coming years. But Woods is impressed by the possibility that so many people might have once lived in a region long thought uninhabited.

"Traditionally, if you would have asked an anthropologist or archaeologist how many people lived [in these Amazon uplands], they'd say almost zero," he said.

"And so this is astounding that there is 60,000 people making a go of it where there aren't supposed to be any."
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... les_2.html


'Pristine' Amazonian Region Hosted Large, Urban Civilization
ScienceDaily (Aug. 28, 2008)
They aren't the lost cities early explorers sought fruitlessly to discover.

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Picture from a low-flying airplane as it passes over the current Kuikuro village, demonstrating the circular-plaza village structure that has historically been and remains a primary cultural trait of urban construction. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Florida)

But ancient settlements in the Amazon, now almost entirely obscured by tropical forest, were once large and complex enough to be considered "urban" as the term is commonly applied to both medieval European and ancient Greek communities.

So says a paper set to appear August 28 in Science co-authored by anthropologists from the University of Florida and Brazil, and a member of the Kuikuro, an indigenous Amazonian people who are the descendants of the settlements' original inhabitants.

"If we look at your average medieval town or your average Greek polis, most are about the scale of those we find in this part of the Amazon," said Mike Heckenberger, a UF professor of anthropology and the lead author of the paper. "Only the ones we find are much more complicated in terms of their planning."

The paper also argues that the size and scale of the settlements in the southern Amazon in North Central Brazil means that what many scientists have considered virgin tropical forests are in fact heavily influenced by historic human activity. Not only that, but the settlements consisting of networks of walled towns and smaller villages, each organized around a central plaza suggest future solutions for supporting the indigenous population in Brazil's state of Mato Grosso and other regions of the Amazon, the paper says.

"Some of the practices that these folks hammered may provide alternative forms of understanding how to do low level sustainable development today," Heckenberger said.

Heckenberger and his colleagues first announced the discovery of the settlements in a 2003 Science paper. The largest date from around 1250 to 1650, when European colonists and the diseases they brought likely killed most of their inhabitants.

The communities are now almost entirely overgrown. But Heckenberger said that members of the Kuikuro, a Xinguano tribe that calls the region home, are adept at identifying telltale landscape features that reveal ancient activity. These include, for example, "dark earth" that indicate past human waste dumps or farming, concentrations of pottery shards and earthworks. Also assisted by satellite imagery and GPS technology, the researchers spent more than a decade uncovering and mapping the obscured communities.

The new paper reports that the settlements consisted of clusters of 150-acre towns and smaller villages organized in spread out "galactic" patterns.

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None of the large towns was as large as the largest medieval or Greek towns. But as with those towns, the Amazonian ones were surrounded by large walls � in their case, composed of earthworks still extant today. Among other repeated features, each Amazonian settlement had an identical formal road, always oriented northeast to southwest in keeping with the mid-year summer solstice, connected to a central plaza.

The careful placement of the like-oriented settlements is indicative of the regional planning and political organization that are hallmarks of urban society, Heckenberger said.

"These are not cities, but this is urbanism, built around towns," he said.

The findings are important because they contradict long-held stereotypes about early Western versus early New World settlements that rest on the idea that "if you find it in Europe, it's a city. If you find it somewhere else, it has to be something else," Heckenberger said.

"They have quite remarkable planning and self-organization, more so than many classical examples of what people would call urbanism," he said.

But the research is also important because it means at least one area of "pristine" Amazon has a history of human activity. That could change not only how scientists assess the flora and fauna, but also how conservationists approach preserving the remains of forest so heavily cleared it is the world's largest soybean producing area. "This throws a wrench in all the models suggesting we are looking at primordial biodiversity," Heckenberger said.

Around the communities the scientists found dams and artificial ponds that indicate inhabitants farmed fish near their homes. They also found the remnants of open areas and large compost heaps suggesting widespread near-town cultivation.

The research has been funded by the National Science Foundation.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 162554.htm

pristine-amazonian-region-hosted-large-urban-civilization-t18758.html


COULD THESE "NEWLY FOUND" CITY'S IN THE AMAZON BE CONNECTED TO THE LOST CITY OF Z, WHICH ALSO SEEMED TO BE IN THE BRAZILLIAN RAINFORREST ACCORDING TO THE INFAMOUS REPORTS OF Col. Percy Harrison Fawcett, A British Surveyor > CLICK THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS MAN, OR LISTEN TO THE C2CAM BROADCAST

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Col. Percy Harrison Fawcett

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_City_of_Z
http://lastdaysoftheincas.com/wordpress/?p=271


Next post will probably be about Africa again :P
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PostWed Apr 14, 2010 12:51 am » by Newearthman


OK KIngz you've challenged me to put something big together...I will get working on it! :P
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PostWed Apr 14, 2010 12:54 am » by Kingz


newearthman wrote:OK KIngz you've challenged me to put something big together...I will get working on it! :P


I'm looking forward to it mate! I saw your website also... very cool, nice ancient stuff on it :love: I Like :flop:
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