The Ethical Hacker's Thread; Hacking Elucidations !

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PostThu Jan 19, 2012 3:51 pm » by Iamthatiam


Ethical hacking, often performed by white hats or skilled computer experts, is the use of programming skills to determine vulnerabilities in computer systems. While the non-ethical hacker or black hat exploits these vulnerabilities for mischief, personal gain or other reasons, the ethical hacker evaluates them, points them out, and may suggest changes to systems that make them less likely to be penetrated by black hats. White hats can work in a variety of ways. Many companies utilize ethical hacking services from consultants or full-time employees to keep their systems and information as secure as possible.

The work of ethical hacking is still considered hacking because it uses knowledge of computer systems in an attempt to in some way penetrate them or crash them. This work is ethical because it is performed to increase the safety of the computer systems. It’s reasoned that if a white hat can somehow break the security protocols of a system, so can a black hat. Thus, the goal of ethical hacking is to determine how to break in or create mischief with the present programs running, but only at the request of the company that owns the system and specifically to prevent others from attacking it.



People enter the field of ethical hacking in a variety of ways. Many people are very computer savvy and many, but not all, have an educational background in computer science. In some instances, the white hat has gained his or her experience by first being a black hat.

If black hat hacking was at a sufficiently criminal level, the black hat turned white hat may have served jail time before resuming a career in a more productive and positive way as an ethical hacker. The computer world is peopled with former black hats, who now hold ethical hacking jobs. Conversely, some white hats, such as Steve Wozniak, never committed any illegal acts, but simply possess the know-how and skills to analyze problems with any computer system.

With increasing use of the Internet and concerns about its security, especially when it comes to things like consumer information or private medical details, there is considerable need for computer experts to work in ethical hacking. Even sites owned by organizations like the US government have been hacked in the past, and concern about information theft remains incredibly high. Designing impenetrable systems or identifying the current weaknesses of a system are vital parts of keeping the Internet safe and information private, and even with the present legion of ethical hackers that perform this work, there is still more work to do.

Those with interest in the field of ethical hacking often acquire a lot of their skills on their own, and many have particular talent with and affinity for computers. Some knowledge can also be acquired through formal education in computer programming. This work requires creativity, and the ethical hacker must be able to think outside of the box, coming up with as many possible ways as he or she can derive, a system might be encroached upon by black hats.


NOTE: A skilled Hacker, can be also a Cracker, since the whole sub-divisions of the Hacking profession are available...However, the mere Cracker performs it in a chaotic way, differently from the Hacker, which is always conscious of his/her actions...For good or for ill...

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ethical-hacking.htm

"Hackers built the Internet. Hackers made the UNIX operating system what it is today. Hackers run Usenet. Hackers make the World Wide Web work. If you are part of this culture, if you have contributed to it and other people in it know who you are and call you a hacker, you're a hacker... "There is another group of people who loudly call themselves hackers, but aren't. These are people (mainly adolescent males) who get a kick out of breaking into computers and phreaking the phone system. Real hackers call these people `crackers' and want nothing to do with them. Real hackers mostly think crackers are lazy, irresponsible, and not very bright, and object that being able to break security doesn't make you a hacker any more than being able to hotwire cars makes you an automotive engineer. Unfortunately, many journalists and writers have been fooled into using the word `hacker' to describe crackers; this irritates real hackers no end. "The basic difference is this: hackers build things, crackers break them... Hackerdom's most revered demigods are people who have written large, capable programs that met a widespread need and given them away, so that now everyone uses them. "If you want to be a hacker, keep reading. If you want to be a cracker, go read the alt.2600 newsgroup and get ready to do five to ten in the slammer after finding out you aren't as smart as you think you are. And that's all I'm going to say about crackers." -- Eric S. Raymond, http://locke.ccil.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html Who are the real hackers? Who are the people we can admire and model our lives upon? The Real Hackers series of these Guides introduces these people. We start with Eric S. Raymond. He is well known in the hacker world. He epitomizes all that a real hacker should be. He has wide ranging programming experience: C, LISP, Pascal, APL, FORTRAN, Forth, Perl, and Python; and is proficient in assembly language for the Z80, 80x86, and 680xx CPUs. He also knows French, Spanish and Italian. Raymond is one of the core developers of Linux, and a major force in the ongoing evolution of the EMACS Lisp language. He maintains fetchmail, a freeware utility for retrieving and forwarding mail from POP2/POP3/IMAP mailservers. But Raymond is perhaps most famous among real hackers as the man who maintains the hacker jargon file. You can read it at http://www.ccil.org/jargon. He also maintains numerous other well-regarded FAQ and HOWTO documents, including the "Java-On-Linux HOWTO," the "Linux Distributions HOWTO," the "PC-Clone UNIX Hardware Buyer's Guide," the "So You Want To Be A UNIX Wizard? FAQ" (aka The Loginataka), and the "How To Become A Hacker FAQ" -- see http://locke.ccil.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html (quoted above). Raymond also founded and runs the Chester County InterLink. This is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that gives free InterNet access to the residents of Chester County, Pennsylvania. At last count, it had over two thousand users and was gaining about fifty a week. Raymond also has written the funniest hacker humor ever: "Unix Wars," which builds upon the really, really ancient hacker humor article, "DEC Wars." You may read it at http://www.devnull.net/docs/unixwars.html. Raymond is the author of many books. They include "The New Hackers Dictionary," now in its 3rd edition (MIT Press 1996, ISBN 0-262-68092-0), and "Learning GNU Emacs," (2nd edition, O'Reilly Associates, ISBN 0-937175-84-6). He was the principal researcher and author of "Portable C and UNIX Systems Programming," (Prentice-Hall ISBN 0-13-686494-5) (the name "J. E. Lapin" appearing on the cover was a corporate fiction). The advent of the September 1996 third edition of "Portable C..." led to interviews with Raymond in Wired magazine (August 1996) and People magazine (October 1996). You can order Raymond's books from http://www.amazon.com/. "Wait, wait!" you say. "I'm on hacker IRC channels and hacker mail lists all the time and I have never heard of Raymond! Why, he doesn't even have a kewl handle like Mauve Knight or Ei8ht or DisordeR. Sheesh, Raymond isn't even a member of some 31337 gang with a name like K-rad Doomsters of the Apocalypse." Welcome to the world of real hackers. As Raymond points out in his "How To Become A Hacker FAQ," there are two kinds of hackers: real hackers who aspire to learn and create, and the phonies who think crashing or breaking into a computer proves they are geniuses. Guess which kind you usually meet at 2600 meetings, on IRC channels with names like #hack, on news groups such as alt.2600 and alt.hacker, and mail lists with names like DC-stuff and HH-Chat? That is not to say that every single person you will meet there is a lamer and a poser. But few real hackers will put up with the flames, criminal mentality and ignorance of the majority of folks you encounter there. Where do you meet real hackers like Raymond? You might encounter a few of them at the annual Def Con or Hope on Planet Earth conferences. (Raymond, however, asserts this is "not likely.") You will, however, find real hackers by the hundreds at the Usenix conferences (see http://www.usenix.org/events/), or by the thousands in the free software movement. ********************************************************* Newbie note: How can you get involved in the free software movement and get to know the hacker demigods? For starters, try GNU. GNU stands for "Gnu's Not UN-IX." The GNU project is an international effort that is being run by the Free Software Foundation. See http://www.gnu.org/ for more information. Are you wondering, "Gnu's Not UN-IX? Whaddaya mean?" Be warned, real hackers have a twisted sense of humor. GNU is a recursive acronym. When the mere thought of a recursive acronym can throw you into gales of laughter, you will know you are turning into a real hacker. ********************************************************* "The free software movement?" you ask. "How come no one ever, ever talks about coding operating system kernels or new scripting languages on alt.2600 or dc-stuff?" Yup, you guessed it, it's because the majority of those folks just want to f*** things up. Real hackers aspire to create software. Not just exploit code for f***ing up computers. But to create serious, big time software. The free software movement is where Raymond and his friends -- folks such as Linus Torvalds (the fellow who launched and ran the Linux project that created the operating system most widely used by hackers) and Larry Wall (creator of Perl, one of the top two programming languages used by hackers) work together. Much of the software these hacker demigods write is copylefted. A copyleft is -- yes, you are right, a copyleft is another example of twisted hacker humor. But basically a copyleft says you have the right to reuse copylefted code in your own software, and even sell it, and make money on it, with only one condition. You must make the source code to your software available for anyone else who may wish to use it in writing their own software. Want to hang out with the hacker demigods? Have you learned to program pretty well yet? If so, you may discover a warm welcome from the GNU folks and others in the free software movement. How did Raymond become one of the tribal elders of the hacker world? It all started, he remembers, in 1968 when he was only 11. "My father worked for Sperry Univac. On days off he would take me in to play with the 1108. It was worth about $8 million -- in 1968 dollars!" Raymond remembers it being a gigantic computer housed in an air-conditioned room. Back then it was a major feat for anyone to get their hands on a computer. Back then they were primitive, expensive and fragile. Raymond remembers reading the ACM journal in 1974 and dreaming about how wonderful it would be if he could ever get his hands on that new operating system they were creating -- Unix. While in high school he did manage to get access -- via teletype -- to a TTY (a verrry primitive terminal) at Ursinus College (located in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania). With that TTY he was able to use the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System computer. But it was mostly just good for playing games. Raymond began college as a math and philosophy major. But in 1976 he got his hands on an account with a DEC PDP-10 -- and a connection to ARPAnet, the early form of today's Internet. "I was seduced by the computing side." Raymond soon switched to computer science. While on ARPAnet, visiting a computer at MIT, Raymond discovered the Hacker Jargon File. Raymond was hooked. He decided he would become a hacker. A real hacker. In 1983 Raymond printed out the jargon file, bound it as a book, titled it "Understanding Your Hacker," and presented it to his boss. His boss loved it. Back in 1983, few people were afraid of those who called themselves hackers. Back then people were aware that hackers were odd and brilliant characters. But that was before crowds of vandals and criminals started claiming they, too, were hackers. Journalists, at a loss as to what to call that new breed of digital gang bangers, started calling them hackers, too. Meanwhile, Raymond came to the realization that he not only had a talent for programming -- he could write texts really well, too. In 1987 he updated "DEC Wars" to create the immortal "Unix Wars," which will finally see print for the first time in Carolyn Meinel's "Happy Hacker" book (American Eagle Publications, in press, due out in late Feb. 1998). In 1990 Raymond decided to spend a weekend updating the Hacker Jargon File. When Monday morning rolled around, he had quadrupled the size of the file. He contacted the folks who maintained it, who were delighted to let him take it over. Not long afterward, he published it as "The New Hacker's Dictionary." So what is Raymond doing today? "I do most of my programming in C," he tells us, "but I still think in Lisp." He works "the odd consulting job, technical reviews of books for publishers like O'Reilly." Adds Raymond, laughing, "They know I know where all the bodies are buried." Where does Raymond see the hacker culture going? "It used to be hard to acculturate, hard to find the hacker community. But now it's expanding tremendously, thanks to the Linux phenomenon. Linux really made a difference. Now we have a common goal, and a universal platform for people's software projects. Perl has had a similar effect, providing us with a cross-platform tool kit." Raymond sees some hope even in the fast-growing, yet incredibly destructive "cracker" scene (crackers are people who break into computers). "People in the cracker community play awhile, then eventually the bright ones end up coming over to the free software culture. Many of them write to me." Raymond says he has communicated with many people who have gone through a digital vandal stage, only to eventually wake up and realize they wanted to feel good about themselves by making the world a better place. So, how many future hacker demigods are reading this Guide? Maybe quite a few. May the Source Code be with you if you should choose to quest for hacker fame the Raymond way!

http://www.windowsecurity.com/whitepapers/Real_Hackers.html

Crackers, Phreaks, and Lamers:

From the late 1980s onward, a flourishing culture of local, MS-DOS-based bulletin boards has been developing separately from Internet hackerdom. The BBS culture has, as its seamy underside, a stratum of `pirate boards' inhabited by crackers, phone phreaks, and warez d00dz. These people (mostly teenagers running PC-clones from their bedrooms) have developed their own characteristic jargon, heavily influenced by skateboard lingo and underground-rock slang.

Though crackers often call themselves `hackers', they aren't (they typically have neither significant programming ability, nor Internet expertise, nor experience with UNIX or other true multi-user systems). Their vocabulary has little overlap with hackerdom's. Nevertheless, this lexicon covers much of it so the reader will be able to understand what goes by on bulletin-board systems.

Here is a brief guide to cracker and warez d00dz usage:

* Misspell frequently. The substitutions

phone => fone
freak => phreak

are obligatory.
* Always substitute `z's for `s's. (i.e. "codes" -> "codez").
* Type random emphasis characters after a post line (i.e. "Hey Dudes!#!$#$!#!$").
* Use the emphatic `k' prefix ("k-kool", "k-rad", "k-awesome") frequently.
* Abbreviate compulsively ("I got lotsa warez w/ docs").
* Substitute `0' for `o' ("r0dent", "l0zer").
* TYPE ALL IN CAPS LOCK, SO IT LOOKS LIKE YOU'RE YELLING ALL THE TIME.

These traits are similar to those of B1FF, who originated as a parody of naive BBS users. For further discussion of the pirate-board subculture, see lamer, elite, leech, poser, cracker, and especially warez d00dz.

SPAM:[from "Monty Python's Flying Circus"] 1. To crash a program by overrunning a fixed-size buffer with excessively large input data. See also buffer overflow, overrun screw, smash the stack. 2. To cause a newsgroup to be flooded with irrelevant or inappropriate messages. You can spam a newsgroup with as little as one well- (or ill-) planned message (e.g. asking "What do you think of abortion?" on soc.women). This is often done with cross-posting (e.g. any message which is crossposted to alt.rush-limbaugh and alt.politics.homosexuality will almost inevitably spam both groups). 3. To send many identical or nearly-identical messages separately to a large number of Usenet newsgroups. This is one sure way to infuriate nearly everyone on the Net.

The second and third definitions have become much more prevalent as the Internet has opened up to non-techies, and to many Usenetters sense 3 is now (1995) primary. In this sense the term has apparantly begun to go mainstream, though without its original sense or folkloric freight -- there is apparently a widespread belief among lusers that "spamming" is what happens when you dump cans of Spam into a revolving fan.

LAMMER: (prob. originated in skateboarder slang):Synonym for luser, not used much by hackers but common among warez d00dz, crackers, and phreakers. Oppose elite. Has the same connotations of self-conscious elitism that use of luser does among hackers.

Crackers also use it to refer to cracker wannabees. In phreak culture, a lamer is one who scams codes off others rather than doing cracks or really understanding the fundamental concepts. In warez d00dz culture, where the ability to wave around cracked commercial software within days of (or before) release to the commercial market is much esteemed, the lamer might try to upload garbage or shareware or something incredibly old (old in this context is read as a few years to anything older than 3 days).

CRACKER:One who breaks security on a system. Coined by hackers in defense against journalistic misuse of the term "hacker." The term "cracker" reflects a strong revulsion at the theft and vandalism perpetrated by cracking rings. There is far less overlap between hackerdom and crackerdom than most would suspect.

SNEAKER: An individual hired to break into places in order to test their security; analogous to "tiger team."

PHREAKER:/phreaking:The art and science of cracking the phone network (so as, for example, to make free long-distance calls). 2. By extension, security-cracking in any other context (especially, but not exclusively, on communications networks).

HACKER:A person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities. 2. One who programs enthusiastically. 3. A person who is good at programming quickly. 4. An expert at a particular program, as in 'a Unix hacker'. 5. [deprecated] A malicious meddler who tries to discover sensitive information by poking around. The correct term for this sense is "cracker."

WIZARD: A person who knows how a complex piece of software or hardware works; esp. someone who can find and fix bugs quickly in an emergency. Someone is a hacker if he or she has general hacking ability, but is a wizard only if he or she has detailed knowledge.

GURU:An expert. Implies not only wizard skill but also a history of being a knowledge resource for others. Less often, used (with a qualifier) for other experts on other systems.

Helping Hacker Culture Grow...

If you enjoyed the Jargon File, please help the culture that created it grow and flourish. Here are several ways you can help:

* If you are a writer or journalist, don't say or write hacker when you mean cracker. If you work with writers or journalists, educate them on this issue and push them to do the right thing. If you catch a newspaper or magazine abusing the work `hacker', write them and straigten them out (this appendix includes a model letter).

* If you're a techie or computer hobbyist, get involved with one of the free Unixes. Toss out that lame Microsoft OS, or confine it to one disk partition and put Linux or FreeBSD or NetBSD on the other one. And the next time your friend or boss is thinking about some commercial software `solution' that costs more than it's worth, be ready to blow the competition away with free software running over i free Unix.

* Contribute to organizations like the Free Software Foundation that promote the production of high-quality free software. You can reach the Free Software Foundation at gnu@prep.ai.mit.edu, by phone at +1-617-542-5942, or by snail-mail at 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA.

* Support the League for Programming Freedom, which opposes over-broad software patents that constantly threaten to blow up in hackers' faces, preventing them from developing innovative software for tomorrow's needs. You can reach the League for Programming Freedom at lpf@uunet.uu.net. by phone at +1 617 621 7084, or by snail-mail at 1 Kendall Square #143, P.O.Box 9171, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 USA.

* If you do nothing else, please help fight government attempts to seize political control of Internet content and restrict strong cryptography. As TNHD III went to press, the so-called `Communications Decency Act' had just been declared "unconstitutional on its face" by a Federal court, but the government is expected to appeal. If it's still law when you read this, please join the effort by the Citizens' Internet Empowerment Coalition lawsuit to have the CDA quashed or repealed. Surf to the Center for Democracy and technology's home page at http://www.cdt.org to see what you can do to help fight censorship of the net.

Here's the text of a letter RMS wrote to the Wall Street Journal to complain about their policy of using "hacker" only in a pejorative sense. We hear that most major newspapers have the same policy. If you'd like to help change this situation, send your favorite newspaper the same letter -- or, better yet, write your own letter.


Dear Editor:

This letter is not meant for publication, although you can publish it if you wish. It is meant specifically for you, the editor, not the public.

I am a hacker. That is to say, I enjoy playing with computers -- working with, learning about, and writing clever computer programs. I am not a cracker; I don't make a practice of breaking computer security.

There's nothing shameful about the hacking I do. But when I tell people I am a hacker, people think I'm admitting something naughty -- because newspapers such as yours misuse the word "hacker", giving the impression that it means "security breaker" and nothing else. You are giving hackers a bad name.

The saddest thing is that this problem is perpetuated deliberately. Your reporters know the difference between "hacker" and "security breaker". They know how to make the distinction, but you don't let them! You insist on using "hacker" pejoratively. When reporters try to use another word, you change it. When reporters try to explain the other meanings, you cut it.

Of course, you have a reason. You say that readers have become used to your insulting usage of "hacker", so that you cannot change it now. Well, you can't undo past mistakes today; but that is no excuse to repeat them tomorrow.

If I were what you call a "hacker", at this point I would threaten to crack your computer and crash it. But I am a hacker, not a cracker. I don't do that kind of thing! I have enough computers to play with at home and at work; I don't need yours. Besides, it's not my way to respond to insults with violence. My response is this letter.

You owe hackers an apology; but more than that, you owe us ordinary respect.

Sincerely, etc.
(...)/[+/-1...

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PostThu Jan 19, 2012 4:00 pm » by Iamthatiam


ENCRYPTION, HOW-TO GUIDES, INTERNET SECURITY »
How to Hide Data in Image, Audio & Video Files: Steganography
Thu, 27/10/11 – 23:40 | 47 Comments

Ever wondered to know how to hide secret messages in images, audio and video files? Well, in this post I will take you through a concept called steganography using which, it is possible to hide your secret information in image files, songs or any other file of your choice. At the end of this post, you can also download free stegnographic tools and start hiding your data.

What is Steganography?

Steganography is a means of obscuring data where secret messages are hidden inside computer files such as images, sound files, videos and even executable files so that, no one except the sender and the receiver will suspect the existence of stealth information in it. Steganography may also involve the usage of cryptography where the message is first encrypted before it is concealed in another file. Generally, the messages appear to be something else such as an image, sound or video so that the transfer of secret data remains unsuspected.

The main advantage of steganography over other methods such as cryptography is that, it will not arose suspicion even if the files fall in the hands of a third party. Unlike cryptographic messages, stegnographic messages will no way attract the attention of a third party by themselves. Thus stegnanography has an upper hand over cryptography as it involves both encryption and obscurity.

What are the Applications of Steganography?

Steganography is mainly used to obscure confidential information/data during storage or transmission. For example, one can hide a secret message in an audio file and send this to another party via email instead of sending the message in the textual format. The receiver on the other end will decrypt the hidden message using the private decryption key. In a worst case scenario, even if a third party does manage to gain access to the email, all he can find is the audio file and not the hidden data inside it. Other usage of steganography include digital watermarking of images for reasons such as copyright protection.

Eventhough steganography has many useful applications, some may use this technique for illegitimate purposes such as hiding a pornographic content in other large files. Roumors about terrorists using steganography for hiding and communicating their secret information and instructions are also reported. An article claiming that, al-Queda had used steganography to encode messages in images and transported them via e-mails, was reported by New York Times, in October 2001.

How do Steganography Tools Work?

Stegnography tools implement intelligent algorithms to carefully embed the encrypted text messages or data inside other larger files such as an image, audio, video or an executable file. Some tools will embed the encrypted data at the end of another file so that there will be enough room for storing [...]


http://www.gohacking.com/
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PostThu Jan 19, 2012 6:52 pm » by Noentry


Very interesting post.
Thanks for the info:flop:
"The third-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking with the majority.
The second-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking with the minority.
The first-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking."
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PostThu Jan 19, 2012 7:07 pm » by Iamthatiam


noentry wrote:Very interesting post.
Thanks for the info:flop:


Youre welcome, mate :flop:

BTW things are developing, the average ppls will must have these skills, in order to aquire info, sometimes just standard intel, considered subversive under the new arising regime, and it's homogeneity shit!!! :robot:

:peep:

:shooting:

:peep:
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PostThu Jan 19, 2012 7:22 pm » by Fatbastard


Iamthatiam. Once again I apologise for going off thread. I am looking for a typist/stenographer/short hand. As an employer, renumeration and conditions could be discussed, interested. FB@Disclose.
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PostFri Jan 20, 2012 5:26 am » by 99socks


Ummm.. astalavista? :mrgreen:
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PostFri Jan 20, 2012 5:31 am » by Iamthatiam


99socks wrote:Ummm.. astalavista? :mrgreen:


Yeah, under Gis(...)..did you see...haha...cool :D
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PostFri Jan 20, 2012 5:33 am » by 99socks


iamthatiam wrote:
99socks wrote:Ummm.. astalavista? :mrgreen:


Yeah, under Gis(...)..did you see...haha...cool :D



Yeah, I posted it in the laugh thread a few weeks ago...
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PostFri Jan 20, 2012 5:36 am » by Iamthatiam


Which one :headscratch: Could you link? :flop:
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PostFri Jan 20, 2012 5:40 am » by 99socks


iamthatiam wrote:Which one :headscratch: Could you link? :flop:



p. 221
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