The UK is crap because...

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 9:46 am » by Toxic32


On the positive side what about these? I will just post a few. The list is to long and I know some of the people that use this site have the attention span of a microcephalus. If you want to read more then the link is at the bottom. Looks like the world can thank Great Brittan for most of the good things in life. And some of the shit!

Agriculture

Improved seed drill - Jethro Tull[1]
Steam-driven ploughing engine - John Fowler[2]
Pioneer of selective breeding and artificial selection - Robert Bakewell[3]
Superphosphate or chemical fertilizer - John Bennet Lawes[4]
Pioneer of the development in dairy farming systems - Rex Paterson[5]
The first commercially successful light farm tractor - Dan Albone[6]
Water desalination process - Sir Francis Bacon[7]
Threshing machine improvements: James Meikle (c.1690-c.1780) & Andrew Meikle (1719–1811) [8]
Hollow pipe drainage: Sir Hew Dalrymple, Lord Drummore (1700–1753) [9]
The Scotch Plough: James Anderson of Hermiston (1739–1808) [10]
Deanstonisation soil-drainage system: James Smith (1789–1850) [11]
The mechanical reaping machine: Rev. Patrick Bell (1799–1869) [12]
The Fresno Scraper: James Porteous (1848–1922) [13]
The Tuley tree shelter: Graham Tuley in 1979 [14]

Aviation innovations

Aircraft design: Frank Barnwell (1910) Establishing the fundamentals of aircraft design at the University of Glasgow.[15]
Turbojet Engine: Frank Whittle

Clock making

Anchor escapement - Robert Hooke[16]
First accurate atomic clock - Louis Essen[17]
Balance spring - Robert Hooke[18]
Balance wheel - Robert Hooke[19]
Co-axial escapement - George Daniels
Grasshopper escapement, H1, H2, H3 and H4 watches (a watch built to solve the longitude measurement problem)[20] - John Harrison
Gridiron pendulum - John Harrison[19]
Lever escapement The greatest single improvement ever applied to pocket watches - Thomas Mudge[19]
Marine chronometer - John Harrison[19]

Clothing manufacturing

Derby Rib (stocking manufacture) - Jedediah Strutt
Flying shuttle - John Kay
Mauveine, the first synthetic organic dye - William Henry Perkin
Power loom - Edmund Cartwright
Spinning frame - John Kay
Spinning jenny - James Hargreaves
Spinning mule - Samuel Crompton
Polyester - John Rex Whinfield
Sewing machine - Thomas Saint in 1790[21]
Water frame - Richard Arkwright
Stocking frame - William Lee
Warp-loom and Bobbinet - John Heathcoat

Communications

Uniform Penny Post, and postage stamp [22] - Sir Rowland Hill
Christmas card [23] - Sir Henry Cole
Valentines card [24] - Modern card 18th century England
Pencil - Cumbria, England
Mechanical pencil - Sampson Mordan and John Isaac Hawkins in 1822.[25]
Clockwork radio [26] - Trevor Baylis
The first Radio transmission using a Spark Transmitter, achieving a range of approximately 500 metres. - David E. Hughes
Electromagnetic induction & Faraday's law of induction Began as a series of experiments by Faraday that later became some of the first ever experiments in the discovery of radio waves and the development of radio - Michael Faraday [27]
Pioneer in the development of radio communication - William Eccles
Tin can telephone a device that conveyed sounds over an extended wire by mechanical vibrations - Robert Hooke 1667 [28]
The world's first radio station on the Isle of Wight
On December 2, 1922, in Sorbonne, France, Edwin Belin, an Englishman demonstrated a mechanical scanning device that was an early precursor to modern television
The first pocket sized handheld television, the MTV-1 - Sir Clive Sinclair
Pioneering work on the development of the long-lasting materials that made today's liquid crystal displays possible - Team headed by Sir Brynmor Jones and Developed by Scotsman George Gray and Englishman Ken Harrison In conjunction with the Royal Radar Establishment and the University of Hull [29]
The first public demonstration of television On 26 January 1926 at 22 Frith Street London - John Logie Baird
405-line television system was the first fully electronic television system used in regular broadcasting - Alan Blumlein
The world's first public broadcasts of high-definition television were made from Alexandra Palace, North London in 1936 - BBC Television Service
The first commercially successful electric telegraph - Sir Charles Wheatstone and Sir William Fothergill Cooke in 1837 [30][31][32]
Pioneer of stereo - Alan Blumlein [33]
Shorthand - Timothy Bright (1550/1-1615). Invented first modern shorthand
Pitman Shorthand - Isaac Pitman
Discovered the photoconductivity of the element selenium. This discovery led to the invention of photoelectric cells (solar panels), including those used in the earliest television systems - Willoughby Smith in 1873
Proposed the existence of the Kennelly–Heaviside layer, a layer of ionised gas that reflects radio waves around the Earth's curvature - Oliver Heaviside
Important improvements of the facsimile machine (Fax Machine) - Frederick Bakewell
The first SMS message was sent over the Vodafone GSM network in 1992 - Neil Papworth
Typewriter - First patent for a device similar to a typewriter granted to Henry Mill in 1714.[34]
the world's first automatic totalisator - George Julius
pioneer in the use of fiber optics in telecommunications - Charles K. Kao and George Hockham
The originator of the concept of geostationary satellites for the use of telecommunications relays - Arthur C Clarke
Teletext Information Service - The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Print stereotyping: William Ged (1690–1749) [35]
Roller printing: Thomas Bell (patented 1783) [36]
The adhesive postage stamp and the postmark: James Chalmers (1782–1853) [37]
Universal Standard Time: Sir Sandford Fleming (1827–1915) [38]
Light signalling between ships: Admiral Philip H. Colomb (1831–1899) [39]
The telephone: Alexander Graham Bell (1847–1922)[40]
The teleprinter: Frederick G. Creed (1871–1957) [41]
The first working television, and colour television; John Logie Baird (1888–1946)[42][43]
Radar: Robert Watson-Watt (1892–1973)[44]
The underlying principles of Radio - James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) [45]
The Automated Teller Machine and Personal Identification Number system - James Goodfellow (born 1937) [46]

Computing

Analytical engine [47] - Sir Charles Babbage
ACE and Pilot ACE [48] - Alan Turing
ARM architecture The ARM CPU design is the microprocessor architecture of 98% of mobile phones and every smartphone.[49]
Bombe [48] - Alan Turing
Colossus computer [50] Colossus computers were the first electronic digital programmable computers. They used vacuum tubes and binary representation of numbers - Tommy Flowers
Difference engine [47] - Sir Charles Babbage
First programmer - Ada Lovelace
First Programming Language Analytical Engine ordercode - Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace
Boolean algebra, the basis for digital logic - George Boole
World Wide Web [51] - Sir Tim Berners-Lee
Developed HTTP and HTML - Tim Berners-Lee
Argo system the world's first electrically powered mechanical analogue computer (also called at the Argo Clock) - Arthur Pollen
Sumlock ANITA calculator the world's first all-electronic desktop calculator - Bell Punch Co
Sinclair Executive, the world's first small electronic pocket calculator - Sir Clive Sinclair
Osborne 1 The first commercially successful portable computer, the precursor to the Laptop computer - Adam Osborne
Designed what was the first laptop computer, the GRiD Compass in 1979 - Bill Moggridge
Heavily involved in the development of the Linux kernel - Andrew Morton & Alan Cox
Sinclair ZX80, ZX81 and ZX Spectrum - Sir Clive Sinclair
Flip-flop circuit, which became the basis of electronic memory (Random-access memory) in computers - William Eccles and F. W. Jordan
Universal Turing machine - The UTM model is considered to be the origin of the "stored program computer" used by John von Neumann in 1946 for his "Electronic Computing Instrument" that now bears von Neumann's name: the von Neumann architecture, also UTM is considered the first operating system - Alan Turing
The development of packet switching co-invented by British engineer Donald Davies and American Paul Baran - National Physical Laboratory, London England
The first person to conceptualise the Integrated Circuit - Geoffrey W.A. Dummer
The first modern computer Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine - (SSEM), nicknamed Baby. Was the world's first stored-program computer. Developed by Frederic Calland Williams & Tom Kilburn[52]
Williams tube - a cathode ray tube used to electronically store binary data (Can store roughly 500 to 1,000 bits of data) - Freddie Williams & Tom Kilburn
Manchester Mark 1 Historically significant computer because of its pioneering inclusion of index registers - Freddie Williams and Tom Kilburn
Autocode regarded as the first ever computer compiler in 1952 for the Manchester Mark 1 computer - Alick Glennie
Developed the concept of microprogramming from the realisation that the Central Processing Unit (CPU) of a computer could be controlled by a miniature, highly specialised computer program in high-speed ROM - Maurice Wilkes in 1951
Ferranti Mark 1 - Also known as the Manchester Electronic Computer was the first computer to use the principles of early CPU design (Central processing unit) - Freddie Williams and Tom Kilburn - Also the world's first successful commercially available general-purpose electronic computer.
The oldest known recordings of computer generated music were played by the Ferranti Mark 1 computer - Christopher Strachey
EDSAC was the first complete, fully functional computer to use the von Neumann architecture, the basis of every modern computer - Maurice Wilkes
EDSAC 2 the successor to the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator or EDSAC. It was the first computer to have a microprogrammed (Microcode)control unit and a bit slice hardware architecture - Team headed by Maurice Wilkes
The first graphical computer game OXO on the EDSAC at Cambridge University - A.S. Douglas
The world's first computer game with 3D graphics - Elite Developed by David Braben and Ian Bell in 1984
Metrovick 950 was the first commercial transistor computer built in 1959 - Metropolitan-Vickers company
LEO Made history by running the first business application (payroll system) on an electronic computer in 1951 for J. Lyons and Co - Maurice Wilkes
Atlas Computer, it was arguably the world's first supercomputer and was the fastest computer in the world until the release of the American CDC 6600 Also This machine introduced many modern architectural concepts: spooling, interrupts, pipelining, interleaved memory, virtual memory and paging - Team headed by Tom Kilburn
The world's first web browser called WorldWideWeb that ran on the NeXTSTEP platform. It was later renamed Nexus to avoid confusion with the World Wide Web - Sir Tim Berners-Lee
Digital audio player (MP3 Player) - Kane Kramer
Touchpad Pointing device - First developed for Psion PLC's Psion MC 200/400/600/WORD Series in 1989
Co-Inventor of the world's first trackball device - developed by Tom Cranston, Fred Longstaff and Kenyon Taylor
The world's first handheld computer (Psion Organiser) - Psion PLC
The first rugged computer - Husky (computer)
First PC-compatible palmtop computer (Atari Portfolio) - Ian Cullimore
Denotational semantics - Christopher Strachey pioneer in programming language design
Wolfram's 2-state 3-symbol Turing machine - Stephen Wolfram.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_British_inventions :clapper:
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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 10:31 am » by Bandanko


you missed out; a British scientist invented the internet... So you people could spill all of your feelings towards our sceptred isle.

See this is what I like about us English (can’t speak for jocks, taffy's or paddies), we take any kind of insults with good humour. You can’t say anything about our country that we have not already said ourselves.

The reason we have "inferior teeth" to the yanks, is we don’t let people we pay tell us how they should look. of course the dentist is going to say you need more work. Vanity is ugly.

Again your only talking about Hollywood teeth here too. There are plenty of billy bobs in the "boondocks" that have shit teeth too. My teeth are perfect except for my wisdom teeth (nearly 40 and I still have the bitches)

We do have WAAAAAY too many cameras though.

it rains far less than you think, it just rains in summer :(

And Dom, our black people talk like Jamaicans of which they are descended from. Patois is hard to follow but very enjoyable once you get the “hegg and beer can” – for egg and bacon phrase right :flop:

I once heard an American say to his kid, "where you hurting at" I had to stop myself walking up and saying, No its "where does it hurt?"

I have lots of European friends and they understand American English a lot easier than English English, because its easier to understand and far simpler.

My family were part of the original colonists in the states... they came from a place called Pleasley near Mansfield (a real inbred shit hole of a place), we kicked them out for being religious nut bars...

oh and PS what language are we all speaking? that’s right... English motherfucker! :flop:

on second thoughts thinking about the summer they have had over there, it does fucking rain too much :flop:

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 10:51 am » by TheDuck


You do all realise after this thread has been left you can no longer moan about any anti-Americanism...

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 12:40 pm » by Bandanko


its all about seperating us, so we keep pointing out what makes us different and not what makes us the same...

do we not all bleed red? cept the french of course ;)

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:10 pm » by Tuor10


Cwmman wrote:The UK is crap because...


1 It rains to much

2 It aint America

3 Feel free to join in...

4 It has England

5 Its surrounded by water... salty water

6 Its a shit shape

7 It has royalty :vomit:

...... etc etc


If I had the wings of a sparrow, and the dirty great arse of a crow, i'd fly over that shit hole Wales tomorrow, and shit on the scum below.

Fucking welsh.

Offa's dyke isn't big enough.

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:23 pm » by flsts1


Tuor10 wrote:If I had the wings of a sparrow, and the dirty great arse of a crow, i'd fly over that shit hole Wales tomorrow, and shit on the scum below.

Fucking welsh.


Used to "work" for a Welshman... (a bilderburger insider :oops: sorry...it was before I woke up ...if he was any indication of a/the national mindset of Wales....I would dare conjecture that they do have issues...
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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:27 pm » by Slith


This doesn't help the cause


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Canubis wrote:
i consume more hard liquor a night then all dtv together...

yet i am so god dam smart....and own this shit in my world..

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:34 pm » by Tuor10


flsts1 wrote:
Tuor10 wrote:If I had the wings of a sparrow, and the dirty great arse of a crow, i'd fly over that shit hole Wales tomorrow, and shit on the scum below.

Fucking welsh.


Used to "work" for a Welshman... (a bilderburger insider :oops: sorry...it was before I woke up ...if he was any indication of a/the national mindset of Wales....I would dare conjecture that they do have issues...



I was on my way to Hollyhead last year. I got lost, so I went into this petrol garage and asked this fellow the way. He spoke in Welsh to me knowing that I couldn't understand a word of what he was saying. In the end, another English couple who were going the same way corrected my path.

They don't like the English one bit. I suppose we don't like them much either. I am not that enamoured by them personally.

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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:39 pm » by flsts1


Tuor10 wrote:I was on my way to Hollyhead last year. I got lost, so I went into this petrol garage and asked this fellow the way. He spoke in Welsh to me knowing that I couldn't understand a word of what he was saying. In the end, another English couple who were going the same way corrected my path.

They don't like the English one bit. I suppose we don't like them much either. I am not that enamoured by them personally.


hummm...kind of like driving through Quebec...
Try not to become a man of success but a man of value.
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PostTue Oct 09, 2012 2:44 pm » by Tuor10


flsts1 wrote:
Tuor10 wrote:I was on my way to Hollyhead last year. I got lost, so I went into this petrol garage and asked this fellow the way. He spoke in Welsh to me knowing that I couldn't understand a word of what he was saying. In the end, another English couple who were going the same way corrected my path.

They don't like the English one bit. I suppose we don't like them much either. I am not that enamoured by them personally.


hummm...kind of like driving through Quebec...


I can imagine.

Don't they want independence from the rest of Canada?


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