U.S. Navy Laser Shoots Down Drone in Test

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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 9:53 am » by Tjahzi



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That it could surprise us, but it really works is new: at the Farnborough Airshow in Britain is a video shown of a laser weapon that is capable From ships or from a vehicle on land with a radius a moving target set aside. The video shows how the U.S. Navy from a great distance an unmanned aircraft "vaporize" a Close-In Weapons System (CIWS) mounted on a Phalanx-conduction.



According Raytheon, the company that built and the U.S. Naval systeeem Sea Systems Command, the laser works very well: all four of the test aircraft were downed at the first attempt. Raytheon, the company behind the miracle weapon, was ever the microwave and is including through clever and sophisticated strategic acquisitions already the world's fifth largest defense contractor.

Drone
The video shows how a "drone (unmanned fighter) is successfully found, attacked and shot down. You see how the device first starts to smolder, then violently begins to burn until nothing left. Raytheon's weapon simply vaporize its target with a laser of 50 kilowatts.

Raytheon is committed to that system also can be used in space and defense experts at the air show also believe that this is the beginning of "clean, real-world applications for lasers in the military".

Also on land
Raytheon Missile Systems' vice president Mike Booen told the BBC that the system on the Phalanx anti-missile system could be built, that now many U.S. and Natoschepen equipped. Last year, Raytheon tested the weapon already successfully land. In another video (below this article) shows how the incoming armor-piercing shells and other artillery neutralizes mortar.

Inexhaustible weapon
According to Mike Booen have armies of its product access to an inexhaustible store: while they have electricity, they photons and they can shoot. "

Raytheon says the two major shortcomings of laser weapons has overcome: the weather (humid air "absorbs" the energy of the laser beam) and goals with reflective surfaces. About how they did that they remain vague, Booen wanted it to say that "the issue of the laser was powerful enough to do."

The tests took place in May at the U.S. Navy test range at San Nicolas Island off the coast of California. Raytheon of the U.S. Army may not release how fast, high and how far it flew downed plane, but wanted it to say that the downed aircraft "behaved as you would in a real war situation would expect."

From microwave to laser gun
Raytheon, the company that developed the weapon, now has 73,000 employees and takes more than 90% of its revenues from defense contracts. It is through strategic acquisitions and sophisticated now the world's fifth largest defense contractor.

Founded in 1922 by three study companions, was a helium rectifier's first product. Tube which was named Raytheon ("divine light"). In 1925 the company changed its name to the product: Raytheon. It was one of the largest manufacturers of vacuum tubes.

During the Second World War Raytheon microwave tubes used in radar equipment. In 1945 discovered an employee of the company, Percy Spencer, that the tubes could also cook food and found out where the microwave.

From 1948 Raytheon also began to produce missiles and later on commercial radio and television transmission facilities. Raytheon in the '50s began to make transistors.

Acquisitions
In 1980 Raytheon, the manufacturer of small aircraft Beechcraft over in 1993 followed by the privejetdivisie British Aerospace. In 1994 both entities were merged into Raytheon Aircraft Company. Mid 90s bought Raytheon's defense business of E-Systems and Texas Instruments. In 1997 the company also bought Hughes Aircraft to General Motors. Hughes Aircraft included air and missile defense activities and the division of General Dynamics, the company defensietak of Delco Electronics and Magnavox. (Mvl)

this was in a paper in my country LOL
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 10:29 am » by Cyberelf


You really think this is it? Check out David Sereda for info on real weapons tech...this is just for public consumption...the powers that be have had far more advanced tech for years...
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 10:36 am » by Sengine


I have to agree with cyberelf. This is what they allow us to see.
The good stuff is still tucked away I'm sure.

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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 10:42 am » by Tjahzi


sengine wrote:I have to agree with cyberelf. This is what they allow us to see.
The good stuff is still tucked away I'm sure.


ofcourse the both of you are right.

if they come out with this kind of of tech in the public then the stuff they must have beyond the scenes must be fucking science fiction
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 12:39 pm » by Savvymalloy


Dunno if you've ever seen these ones either...


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:cheers:

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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 12:57 pm » by Cyberelf



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check this out with boyd bushman and david sereda....tesla death ray...by the way...how the hell do i upload a vid into these comment boxes?New to uploading.....
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 12:59 pm » by whitedeath


cyberelf wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZGPLSnxUnc
check this out with boyd bushman and david sereda....tesla death ray...by the way...how the hell do i upload a vid into these comment boxes?New to uploading.....


hit the youtube box when in full editor reply mode, then take the part after v= in the youtube link, stick it between the tags and that's it.


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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 1:48 pm » by Tjahzi


awesome-o clips

thanks!
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 4:22 pm » by Savwafair2012


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UAV shot down by anti-aircraft energy laser

US firm Raytheon has unveiled its anti-aircraft laser at the Farnborough Airshow in Hampshire.

The Laser Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) can either be used on its own or alongside a gunnery system.

In May, the laser was used to shoot down unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in a series of tests.

Raytheon said the solid state fibre laser produces a 50 kilowatt beam and can be used against UAV, mortar, rockets and small surface ships.

The idea of using lasers as weapons has been around almost as long as the laser itself, invented in 1960.

Initially, the systems were chemical lasers, which get their power from a chemical reaction. They are very large pieces of equipment and are very fuel hungry, requiring a significant quantity of chemicals to drive them. The fuel is frequently toxic, requiring operators to don protective clothing.

Solid state lasers, in contrast, consist of a glass or ceramic material to generate a laser beam.

They are smaller, more compact and only require an energy input to generate the beam, although the energy required is still significant.

However, until recently, solid state lasers were not able to reach the same power levels as chemical lasers and so were not deemed suitable for military use.

'Last defence'

Peter Felstead, editor of Jane's Defence Weekly, told BBC News that CIWS was the start of real world applications for military solid state lasers.

Artists representation of what the CIWS laser beam looks like which, in reality, is invisible. "OK, so a UAV isn't armoured, nor is it flying fast, but as you can see from the video they shot it down in flames," he said.

"That's the very beginnings of what we can expect to see as firms miniaturise their technology and make them more effective."

Speaking to BBC News, Raytheon Missile Systems' vice president, Mike Booen, said that the tests, performed in a maritime environment, were a big step forward for laser technology.

"We've tied this into Phalanx, the US Navy's anti-missile defence system that links a multiple barrelled 20mm Gatling gun to a radar guidance mechanism.

"This system is already installed in many ships, both in the US and other Nato nations, such as the Royal Navy.


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It was a bad day for UAVs and a good one for laser technology”

Mike Booen

VP, Raython Missile Systems
"It functions as the last line of defence, so if you can fit a laser onto it, you have a longer reach and an unlimited magazine, cause it keeps on throwing out photons," he added.

Two problems that have dogged laser weapon development for some time are weather conditions and the target itself. Damp maritime air can absorb the laser energy before it reaches the target and - as developers discovered in the 1960s when trying to target Russian Mig aircraft - a reflective surface can negate much of the laser's effectiveness.

Mr Booen acknowledges this, but said that these problems could be overcome.

"Every material reflects, but you can overcome this with power; once you get over a certain threshold - measured in multiple kilowatts - then the laser does what it is designed to do," he said.

Mr Booen said that once a material started getting hot, it affected the reflective ability, making the target absorb more energy and eventually leading to its destruction.

Land use

In May, the firm knocked out a number of UAVs at the US Navy test range on San Nicolas Island off the coast of California.

Although Raytheon would not give details of the height, speed and range of the UAVs, saying that data "sensitive", it did say that the Navy wanted tests to be as realistic as possible, suggesting that the aircraft were behaving in the way military planners would expect them to.

"This is the first time a UAV threat has been targeted and neutralised in a marine environment," said Mr Booen

"On a ship, the laser can be mounted inside a ship and the beam fed up through fibre cables.

"It was a bad day for UAVs and a good one for laser technology," he added.

The firm is also working on a sister land based system that can be used to target mortar and rocket rounds.

"On land, it could be mounted in trailers so it has applications across the globe," said Mr Booen.

Mr Felstead agreed, saying it could have "great capability" as a last line of defence in many situations.

"There are numerous real world applications for a laser than can knock out airborne threats, especially mortars and rockets.

"Airbases in Afghanistan, the Green Zone in Baghdad or the border with Gaza and Israel could all potentially use something like this.

"We're still some way off being able to take out an [Intercontinental Ballistic Missile] missile with laser technology, but we're on the path to that," he added.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10682693
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PostTue Jul 20, 2010 4:33 pm » by Flecktarn


uk military are playing with lazers and intend to go public 2011 ,yet it has been in use since 94 ,also a skin type cam for tanks etc ,very efective easy to apply and remove to change enviroments ,
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