What The Media Isn't Telling You About The Drug War

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PostWed Oct 31, 2012 8:37 am » by *WillEase*



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PostWed Oct 31, 2012 9:11 am » by *WillEase*


Listen America, Mexican Drug Cartels Are ‘Part of Your World’!
March 8, 2012 • From theTrumpet.com
Think the horrific violence happening in Mexico will never happen in America? Think again.


Imagine. You’re sitting on a bus, listening to music, staring sleepily out at the Mexican countryside. Suddenly, the bus screeches to a halt, and there follows a lot of shouting and some random gunshots. Seconds later, gun-wielding mafiosi board the bus and tell the passengers to disembark.

The terrified travelers are divided into groups. The elderly are promptly eradicated, shot in the head in full view of the onlookers. Next, select women are pried from the arms of children and one another, and dragged kicking and screaming behind the bus. Everyone knows their fate. Minutes later, with the old gone, the women and children dead or paralyzed with shock, the attention turns to the last group: the able-bodied males.

The men are herded into a group, which is surrounded by smirking, laughing gangsters. Each man is given a weapon; one gets a rusty old knife, another a machete, another a framer’s hammer. The unlucky are given a stick or rock. Now armed, the bewildered men are instructed to fight. Not the cartel members. One another.

Fear causes their hands to tremble; they’re hesitant. Killing an innocent man, someone you were chatting with only minutes earlier, is not an easy task. But the men quickly realize that the only way to survive is to kill. In a split second, these normal men, husbands and fathers, farmers, bricklayers and factory workers, transform into callous gladiators. Unskilled in the art of murder, their arms flail wildly. Chunks of human flesh fly, the dust turns deep red, and hemorrhaging carcasses begin to collapse. Thirty minutes later, all that remain are a handful of blood-soaked, exhausted, hollow-eyed men. The victims are now victors.

The gangsters, members of Los Zetas, Mexico’s deadliest drug cartel, whoop and holler and sing Mexican folk songs as they toss the bodies in the ditch beside the road. They’re elated, not just because they’ve recently gratified their lusts or grown a little richer, but also because they’ve got new recruits. In the coming days, the male survivors will be exploited. Some will have to infiltrate enemy territory to assassinate rival cartel members. Others will go to war with the Mexican Army. Others will be saddled with drugs and sent across the border into America. No matter the assignment, each will end up dead.

Believe it or not, this happens.
http://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/ ... 692716.php
Not in Afghanistan, or Iraq, or North Korea. But right across the border, in a nation adored by Americans for its cheap beer and enticing beach resorts. Since 2006, more than 40,000 people have been killed in drug-related violence in Mexico. The violence spans the country, and is intensifying. In 2006, there were 2,119 cartel-related murders. In 2010, the number shot up to 15,273, and the 2011 total is expected to be somewhere around 17,000.

Between the cartel-versus-cartel wars and the cartels-versus-Mexican military wars, “some parts of Mexico can credibly be described as a war zone,” Stratfor reported this week. The violence runs the gamut of barbaric too, ranging from simple shootings to decapitation and dismemberment, or being buried alive head first or dropped in acid. No one is immune either. The cartels often kidnap innocent people, and have no qualms about using their AK-47s in public places.

If you live in America it’s possible, though not necessarily likely, you’ve heard a little about Mexico’s out-of-control violence.

What you probably don’t know, however, is that these drug cartels are deeply entrenched in the United States!

The fact that you haven’t heard too much about this isn’t your fault. The U.S. government and mainstream media have been astonishingly silent on this issue. (This shameful silence is perhaps as significant as the cartel violence and infiltration itself.) It’s a real and extremely dire crisis—that very few in America want to talk about.

In 2008, the U.S. Justice Department warned that “Mexican dtos [drug trafficking organizations] are the most pervasive organizational threat to the United States. They are active in every region of the country and dominate the illicit drug trade in every area …” (emphasis added throughout). That was four years ago.

Today, Mexican drug cartels have established a foothold in every U.S. state.

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They’re present in more than one thousand American cities.


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In a 2009 interview with a local cnn station in Atlanta, William Newell, the special agent in charge of the Phoenix branch of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives at the time, explained the ultimate ambition of the cartels. Their goal, he said, “is to come to the United States and take over.” That statement, from an official stationed on the front lines of the drug war, ought to deeply alarm the U.S. government. And it ought to have made prime-time cnn national news. The way these cartels “take over is very violent,” Newell continued.

“We’re seeing signs of people being tortured and brutally beaten all across the U.S., not just along the southwest border.”

In August 2008, five bodies were discovered in an apartment in an affluent neighborhood in Birmingham, Alabama. The victims had been tortured before being murdered by cartel members. Drug Enforcement Administration special agent Gregory Borland worked the case and told reporters the violence was at a “level we’ve never seen before.”

Americans like to “make themselves feel better by saying that [torture] is not part of my world,” Borland said.

His job, he stated, is to tell naive Americans that cartel violence “is a part of your world.”

The number of cartel-related deaths inside America isn’t high—yet. But this isn’t a crisis of numbers—it’s about the presence of exceptionally violent drug cartels inside America. All of Mexico’s largest cartels—the Sinaloa Federation, Los Zetas, La Familia Michoacana (lfm), the Gulf Cartel (cdg), the Juarez Cartel, the Tijuana Cartel—are operating in all of America’s major cities, from Phoenix to Maine, Boise to Anchorage.

Large cities like Dallas, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Miami, New York, El Paso, Houston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, San Antonio and San Diego are drug hubs. Bulk loads of drugs such as cocaine, marijuana and meth are taken to warehouses in these cities where the drugs are re-processed, re-packaged and dispatched to smaller markets. “The same folks who are rolling heads in the streets of Ciudad Juarez are operating in Atlanta,” warned Jack Killorin, the head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In America, “they are just better behaved.”

For now.

In Cartel, Sylvia Longmire, a specialist in Mexico’s drug wars, gives an eye-opening glimpse into the state of affairs. She writes, “[F]or [Americans] living in or near a decent-sized metropolitan area, chances are pretty high that their hometown is infested with drugs being managed by one of the Mexican cartels.” Think about that—a member of Los Zetas could be living down the street from you.

In many cities, the cartels have developed alliances with local gangs and criminal organizations. The gangs provide the cartels with storage and transportation, and in return the cartels supply the gangs with a wholesale supply of drugs. These deadly relationships often come with horrific consequences.


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In an interview on Lou Dobbs, Stratfor analyst Fred Burton explained: “Street violence in Los Angeles, Portland, Chicago, New York City or Washington, d.c., is directly attributable to the violence that’s taking place in Mexico. Meaning, the cartels are working with criminal gangs inside the United States, and they’re carrying out these violent murders and crimes on the streets of America.”

That’s a blockbuster headline—“Mexican Drug Cartels Operating on America’s Streets”—that you don’t see in the mainstream press.

Right now, the violence tends to be worse in regions and cities close to the border. In some areas, it’s gotten so bad that parts of the border are actually controlled by the cartels. These cartels have agents stationed on hills and ridges, who watch the border with binoculars and shoot dead any illegals who dare to cross into America without cartel approval. Think on that. Can America even call itself a sovereign nation if it doesn’t control its borders?

For now, it’s in the best interest of the cartels to lie low in the U.S. They try to avoid local and federal authorities, and only resort to violence when they deem it necessary. But think about the deadly concoction brewing in hundreds of American cities. Unemployment is growing, especially among the youth. Racial tension is rising. Many American cities are already overwhelmed with gang violence and organized crime. Now, add the presence of some of the most violent organizations in the world to that mix. It’s another gargantuan crisis just waiting to explode!

It might be okay as long as the cartels inside the U.S. are allowed to ply their trade. But what’s going to happen when the gangs get testy—or worse, state or federal authorities decide to crack down on them? The drug violence in Mexico actually took off in 2006, when President Felipe Calderon decided to get tough with the cartels. Since then, tens of thousands of Mexican soldiers have been rallied to combat the cartels. The result? More violence, more kidnappings, more mass graves.

Imagine the anarchy that would result if the U.S. government decided to confront the cartels.

Then again, imagine the inevitable violence and anarchy that will come if the government remains idle and allows the cartels to continue to operate.

If you live in America, take Gregory Borland’s advice and realize: Mexico’s violent drug cartels are “part of your world.”

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PostWed Oct 31, 2012 9:25 pm » by Truthdefender


Use to do a little business with La Eme, in my younger, bolder days. The meetings were usually pretty mellow--low level guys. My concern with what is going on in Mexico, besides the loss of life, is the amount of weapons and personnel (thugs) that will pour over the border when the SHTF, or should the U.S. military be preoccupied with internal strife in the nation, or a sneak attack on the US. Every Mexican cowboy down south will dream of the treasure and booty to be taken from the well-to-do northern neighbors.


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PostWed Oct 31, 2012 9:51 pm » by Phaeton


One day an Egyptian Muslim was reading the Injil;
A voice spoke to him saying, "I am Jesus Christ, whom you hate."


Qaint signature quote. Per definition, no Muslim hates Jesus Christ - but is obliged to hold him in highest regard - even higher than Muhammad in a certain sense. Its like saying a Christian is approached with the words "I am Moses, whom you hate'. Hating 'Christians' is a whole other matter completely, but Jesus; impossible. If he does, he is no Muslim. Fact.

All well I trust TD?
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


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PostThu Nov 01, 2012 12:33 am » by Truthdefender


Phaeton wrote:
One day an Egyptian Muslim was reading the Injil;
A voice spoke to him saying, "I am Jesus Christ, whom you hate."


Qaint signature quote. Per definition, no Muslim hates Jesus Christ - but is obliged to hold him in highest regard - even higher than Muhammad in a certain sense. Its like saying a Christian is approached with the words "I am Moses, whom you hate'. Hating 'Christians' is a whole other matter completely, but Jesus; impossible. If he does, he is no Muslim. Fact.

All well I trust TD?


I know Muslims believe they honor Jesus, no doubt. But the Jesus of the Quran is not the same Jesus who was revealed in the Gospels. I found the signature quote on a site about the supernatural conversion of thousands of Muslims over the last few decades through dreams, visions, and voices. I find the testimony contained in the sig quite profound. There is deep theology behind those simple sentences. If the testimony is to be believed, Jesus is declaring to all Muslims that the Jesus they reject is the Lord, whom they will not find through Islam.


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PostThu Nov 01, 2012 8:38 pm » by Phaeton


Truthdefender wrote:
Phaeton wrote:
One day an Egyptian Muslim was reading the Injil;
A voice spoke to him saying, "I am Jesus Christ, whom you hate."


Qaint signature quote. Per definition, no Muslim hates Jesus Christ - but is obliged to hold him in highest regard - even higher than Muhammad in a certain sense. Its like saying a Christian is approached with the words "I am Moses, whom you hate'. Hating 'Christians' is a whole other matter completely, but Jesus; impossible. If he does, he is no Muslim. Fact.

All well I trust TD?


I know Muslims believe they honor Jesus, no doubt. But the Jesus of the Quran is not the same Jesus who was revealed in the Gospels. I found the signature quote on a site about the supernatural conversion of thousands of Muslims over the last few decades through dreams, visions, and voices. I find the testimony contained in the sig quite profound. There is deep theology behind those simple sentences. If the testimony is to be believed, Jesus is declaring to all Muslims that the Jesus they reject is the Lord, whom they will not find through Islam.


I dont agree. The only difference is interpretation. Nowhere in the Qur'an is there an unequivocal contradiction between it and the Words of Jesus himself. Nowhere. Only the G*d in the flesh aspect / Triune godhead is different, and unique to the NT - Christian interpretation. Now Im talking about explicit clearcut content, not 'implicit possibly interpretable as we would want to interpret it' content. Like Jesus saying 'The Father and I are thesame' or Before Abraham was, I AM', and such.

If Jesus was the Creator G*d in the flesh, he would have been bloody specific about it, and he would not wait until the NT to tell us about it.

Further, this doesnt have any bearing on my argument, that if any Muslim hates Jesus in any way, he is no Muslim. A Muslim might hate Christians who have elevated Christ to being the One G*d Himself, but never Jesus himself.

The value of such a quote is only there if it has any semblance of truth. Seems to me this is an oxymoronic - very probably fantasy born quote. Ie. in all probability, completely made up.

Maybe we should move to another thread for this conversation, I would love to finally get to the bottom of this subject. For starters, for my understanding of your logic, how would you explain that no other prophet - at any time - in any explicit direct fashion, ever foretold the coming of the Creator G*d into his own creation, into the flesh? Why, given the three branches of Abrahamic scripture, is the NT / Christian interpretation the only variant that finds the Triune concept as obvious?
"Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music"
"All our science measured against reality, is primitive and childlike - yet, in contemporary consensus, its the most precious thing we have"


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