What was your favorite book as a child?

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 6:36 pm » by domdabears


Poooooot wrote:
Dom Da Bears wrote:Hatchet.

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Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson is on his way to visit his father when the single engine plane in which he is flying crashes. Suddenly, Brian finds himself alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but his clothing, a tattered windbreaker, and the hatchet his mother has given him as a present -- and the dreadful secret that has been tearing him apart ever since his parents' divorce. But now Brian has no time for anger, self-pity, or despair -- it will take all his know-how and determination, and more courage than he knew he possessed, to survive.

Seems pretty deep for a kid. :shock: I'm not surprised you like this one. :flop:

This was in 5th grade.

The boys read this and watched the movie, while the girls read and watched The Blue Lagoon, so they could learn about their periods.
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 6:40 pm » by Poooooot


Dom Da Bears wrote:This was in 5th grade.

The boys read this and watched the movie, while the girls read and watched The Blue Lagoon, so they could learn about their periods.


lmao. I wish Brooke Shields woulda taught me about MY period. We watched some boring health movie.

The Girl with the Green Ribbon was my favorite from the ages of 6-8. When I was in fifth grade I was 10 years old, and into Goosebumps (as mentioned above) and this one book called Homecoming:
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Homecoming, set in the very early 1980s, tells the story of four siblings aged between six and thirteen, whose mother abandons them one summer afternoon in their car next to a Connecticut shopping mall during an aborted road trip to a family member in Bridgeport. Realizing that their mother is not coming back, and that they cannot go home (their father walked out before the youngest child was born), the children travel together, mostly on foot, trying to reach Bridgeport. There, they hope to find their missing mother at the home of a relative they have never met. The children find themselves on a journey that is emotional as well as literal - during their weeks on the road their adventures and the people they meet along the way help them to find out more about who they are and what is important to them, as well as to cope with the loss of their mother and to understand society's reaction to her poverty, isolation, mental illness and the fact that she was an unmarried mother of four.
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 6:41 pm » by Kaarmaa


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In the ruins of an amphitheatre just outside an unnamed city lives Momo, a little girl of mysterious origin. She came to the ruin, parentless and wearing a long, used coat. She is illiterate and can't count, and she doesn't know how old she is. When asked, she replies, "As far as I remember, I've always been there." She is remarkable in the neighbourhood because she has the extraordinary ability to listen — really listen. By simply being with people and listening to them, she can help them find answers to their problems, make up with each other, and think of fun games. The advice given to people "go and see Momo!" has become a household phrase and Momo makes many friends, especially an honest, silent street-cleaner, Beppo, and a poetic, extroverted tour guide, Guido.

This pleasant atmosphere is spoiled by the arrival of the Men in Grey, eventually revealed as a race of paranormal parasites stealing the time of humans. Appearing in the form of grey-clad, grey-skinned, bald men, these strange individuals present themselves as representing the Timesavings Bank and promote the idea of "timesaving" among the population: Supposedly, time can be deposited to the Bank and returned to the client later with interest. After encountering the Men in Grey, people are made to forget all about them but not about the resolution to save as much time as possible for later use. Gradually, the sinister influence of the Men in Grey affects the whole city: life becomes sterile, devoid of all things considered time-wasting, like social activities, recreation, art, imagination, or sleeping. Buildings and clothing are made exactly the same for everyone and the rhythms of life become hectic. In reality the more time people save the less they have; the time they save is actually lost to them. Instead, it is consumed by the Men in Grey in the form of cigars made from the dried petals of the hour: lilies that represent time. Without these cigars the Men in Grey cannot exist.

Momo, however, is a wrench in the plans of the Timesaving Bank thanks to her special personality. The Men in Grey try various plans to take care of her, derailing her from stopping their scheme, but they all fail. When even her closest friends fall under the influence of the Men in Grey in one way or another, Momo's only hope to save the time of mankind is the personification of Time Professor Secundus Minutus Hora (Second Minute Hour) and Cassiopeia, a tortoise which can communicate through writing on her shell and can see thirty minutes into the future. Momo's adventure will take her from the depths of her heart, where her own time flows from in the form of lovely hour-lilies, to the lair of the Men in Grey themselves, where the time people believe they save is hoarded.

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 7:22 pm » by domdabears


The57ironman wrote:Image

Don't worry. This was one of my favorites too.
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 7:23 pm » by domdabears


This one too

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 7:25 pm » by domdabears


This one too

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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 7:26 pm » by Poooooot


Aw, I'm just yankin' your chain, Ironman. That's a classic! :flop:
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 7:42 pm » by Zer0


My favorite book was my Pe... nah you are all expecting me to say that.

The truth is, my favourite book as a child was

Image

It was a Theosophical interpretation of the life of Yeshua; it covers those years in his life that where skipped by the Bible. From a being a water boy, being chosen by the "Brotherhood" to eventually mastering the mysteries of all mayor religions by travelling around the world, becoming the sacrificial lamb for the world, and it ends with what happens after his death, from his point of view.

My favourite part was when he becomes attracted to an Egyptian priestess, and because he is mastering the Egyptian mysteries at the time, he must remain in the secret chambers so he can never meet her physically, so he uses his astral body to visit her, she eventually falls in love with him back even though she can not see him. So Yeshua disobeys his orders and enters the Temple where she lives, and the guards just start beating him up.. and he just says "I just wanted to see her..."

Made me cry as a child ;_;
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 8:02 pm » by Poooooot


Otoel wrote:My favorite book was my Pe... nah you are all expecting me to say that.

The truth is, my favourite book as a child was

Image

It was a Theosophical interpretation of the life of Yeshua; it covers those years in his life that where skipped by the Bible. From a being a water boy, being chosen by the "Brotherhood" to eventually mastering the mysteries of all mayor religions by travelling around the world, becoming the sacrificial lamb for the world, and it ends with what happens after his death, from his point of view.

My favourite part was when he becomes attracted to an Egyptian priestess, and because he is mastering the Egyptian mysteries at the time, he must remain in the secret chambers so he can never meet her physically, so he uses his astral body to visit her, she eventually falls in love with him back even though she can not see him. So Yeshua disobeys his orders and enters the Temple where she lives, and the guards just start beating him up.. and he just says "I just wanted to see her..."

Made me cry as a child ;_;


Damn, Oto. that's pretty deep for a kid.

I emailed you, btw. You get it?
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PostFri Oct 12, 2012 8:07 pm » by Domeika


Vingt mille lieues sous les mers ~ Jules Verne


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