Why is China building massive empty cities?

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PostSat Feb 12, 2011 2:49 pm » by Evildweeb


{This story appeared on Coast-to-Coast this evening}

Feb 7 2011, 11:10 AM
posted by watchman92 @ thefinalphase.com

post Feb 7 2011, 03:33 PM


Any guesses as to why China is building giant, empty cities in the middle of nowhere? Could they be making places for people to live after a retaliatory strike renders most of their big cities unlivable?

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=260645

FROM JEROME CORSI'S RED ALERT
Why is China building eerie 'ghost cities'?
Google Earth photographs reveal towns completely devoid of people
Posted: February 06, 2011
9:51 pm Eastern

http://thefinalphaseforum.invisionzone. ... topic=2310

� 2011 WorldNetDaily
Editor's Note: The following report is excerpted from Jerome Corsi's Red Alert, the premium online newsletter published by the current No. 1 best-selling author, WND staff writer and senior managing director of the Financial Services Group at Gilford Securities.

Why is China constructing large, well-designed "ghost cities" that are completely devoid of people?


China's empty roads (source: Business Insider)
Jerome Corsi's Red Alert reports Google Earth photographs of China depict city after city of vast complexes consisting of office skyscrapers, government buildings, apartment buildings, residential towers and homes, all connected by networks of empty roads � with some of the cities located in China's truly most inhospitable locations.

Images of these "ghost cities" � after countless billions of dollars have been spent on the towns' design and construction � reveal nobody lives in them.


"The photographs look like giant movie sets prepared to film apocalyptic motion pictures in which some sort of a neutron war or bizarre natural disaster has eliminated people from the face of the earth while leaving the skyscrapers, sports stadiums, parks and roads perfectly intact," Corsi noted. "One of China's ghost cities is actually built in the middle of a desert in Inner Mongolia."

Business Insider ran a series of photos of these Chinese ghost cities. One showed no cars in the city except for approximately 100 parked in largely empty lots clustered around a government building, and another showed a beautiful wetland park with people added using Photoshop.


No cars in the city, except for a few dozen parked at the government center (source: Business Insider)
China now has an estimated inventory of 64 million vacant homes. It is building up to 20 new ghost cities a year on the country's "vast swathes of free land."


Empty roads in Zhengzhou (source: Panoramio)
ScallyWagAndVagabond.com quoted Patrick Chovanec, a business teacher at Tsinghua University in Beijing, who explained, "Who wants to be the mayor who reports that he didn't get 8 percent GDP growth this year? Nobody wants to come forward with that. So the incentives in the system are to build. And if that's the easiest way to achieve growth, then you build."

For more information on China's ghost cities, read Jerome Corsi's Red Alert, the premium, online intelligence news source by the WND staff writer, columnist and author of the New York Times No. 1 best-seller, "The Obama Nation."

Red Alert's author, who received a doctorate from Harvard in political science in 1972, is the author of the No. 1 New York Times best-sellers "The Obama Nation" and (with co-author John E. O'Neill) "Unfit for Command." He is also the author of several other books, including "America for Sale," "The Late Great U.S.A." and "Why Israel Can't Wait." In addition to serving as a senior staff reporter for WorldNetDaily, Corsi is a senior managing director in the financial-services group at Gilford Securities.

Read more: Why is China building eerie 'ghost cities'?

http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=260645#ixzz1DI2I3ex0
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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:14 am » by Truthdefender


MORE EERIE 'GHOST CITIES' POPPING UP!

By Chelsea Schilling


Why is China constructing large, well-designed “ghost cities” that are completely devoid of people?

Now, the BBC reports a giant new Chinese-built city has been spotted in Africa in the outskirts of Angola’s capital Luanda.


The city, Nova Cidade de Kilamba, was designed to hold up to a half million people and features 750 eight-story apartment buildings, 12 schools and more than 100 retail units, according to the report.

State-owned China International Trust and Investment Corporation reportedly took less than three years to build the city at a cost of $3.5 billion. It covers 12,355 acres.

BBC former Angola correspondent Louise Redvers reported that they discovered that the city’s buildings are completely empty.

The empty cities aren’t only in Africa.

WND and Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert reported just last year that Google Earth photographs of China depict city after city of vast complexes consisting of office skyscrapers, government buildings, apartment buildings, residential towers and homes, all connected by networks of empty roads – with some of the cities located in China’s truly most inhospitable locations.


Images of these “ghost cities” – after countless billions of dollars have been spent on the towns’ design and construction – reveal nobody lives in them.

Block after block of empty houses and apartment buildings, glamorous public buildings, magnificent public parks and sports complexes, even art museums, remain entirely empty.

“The photographs look like giant movie sets prepared to film apocalyptic motion pictures in which some sort of a neutron war or bizarre natural disaster has eliminated people from the face of the earth while leaving the skyscrapers, sports stadiums, parks and roads perfectly intact,” Corsi noted. “One of China’s ghost cities is actually built in the middle of a desert in Inner Mongolia.”

Business Insider ran a series of photos of these Chinese ghost cities. One showed no cars in the city except for approximately 100 parked in largely empty lots clustered around a government building, and another showed a beautiful wetland park with people added using Photoshop.

At the time, China had an estimated inventory of 64 million vacant homes and was building up to 20 new ghost cities a year on the country’s “vast swathes of free land.

photos and article here:
http://www.wnd.com/2012/07/bizarre-chin ... ies-arise/


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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:20 am » by monica44


Ever watched the series Persons Unknown......
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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:31 am » by Kaarmaa


I looked at the google earth pictures and my husband said "what are you looking at, plans to bild a..." (won't write the word down but it goes booom!^^) and I said no, its chinese ghost citys and he said "I heard about them. They are ecological citys supposed to make a better place to live in the futur.

Maybe one like this
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/9151487/Chinese-move-to-their-eco-city-of-the-future.html

Chinese move to their eco-city of the future
The Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco City - the world's largest eco-city - is not a green, carbon-free paradise where cars are banned from the streets. nstead, as its first residents moved in this month, they found it is remarkably like most other Chinese cities: shrouded in smog and depressingly grey.

But then the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco City, just over an hour from Beijing by train, is not supposed to be a whizzy vision of the future.

It is far more practical - a model for how Chinese cities could develop and solve some of the enormous problems facing them: permanent gridlock, a lack of water and ruinous electricity bills.

If a few of the small changes adopted in Tianjin were rolled out nationwide, the results could dramatically change China's devastating impact on the environment.

"Our eco-city is an experiment, but it is also practical," said Wang Meng, the deputy director of construction. "There are over 100 eco-cities in the world now, and they are all different. If you look at the one in Abu Dhabi, they spent a huge amount of money and bought a lot of technology. It is very grand, but is it useful?"


To date, almost all of the world's eco-cities have been green follies, crippled by a central paradox: the more they enforce bothersome environmental rules, the less people want to live in them.

In Tianjin, the residents will not be expected to make any particular effort to be green. "If they take the bus and sort their rubbish for recycling, they will be making their contribution," said a spokesman for the city.

Their main contribution, in fact, is to be guinea pigs as planners experiment with the city around them. General Motors, for example, is using Tianjin to work out if electric driverless cars can function in a normal traffic system.

"Some eco-cities are too idealistic. In Tianjin they do not want to stop people from driving, but they do want to put into place policies that will help our vehicles to operate successfully," said Chris Borroni-Bird, the head of GM's autonomous driving project in Detroit.

He said Tianjin will allow GM to road-test the next generation of vehicles: small urban cars that drive themselves but are safe in an environment full of unpredictable drivers, pedestrians and cyclists.

Not only does China desperately need to solve its traffic problems, but it is one of the few countries that can throw significant resources at new ideas and indeed build cities from scratch in order to experiment.

Other projects on trial include a low energy lighting system from Philips and rubbish bins that can empty themselves, sucking litter into an underground network, by a Swedish company called Envac.

"We are not sure about that one," said a spokesman. "It requires people not to put the wrong sort of rubbish in the bins, or it could jam the system and prove expensive to maintain."

Just over three years ago, the site of the eco-city was a desolate wasteland of abandoned salt pans. An area half the size of Manhattan, it was tainted by decades of chemical pollution from the factories that border it.

By the time it is finished, in the next decade or so, some 250 billion yuan (£25 billion) will have been spent by the Chinese and Singaporean governments, and a number of private companies, on transforming the site into a comfortable home for 350,000 people - 60 families have already moved in.

Already, one new technology has been patented.

"We had an industrial reservoir that was full of heavy metals," said Mr Wang. "It used to be so bad that people could not go near it because of the smell. Now we have cleaned it with a special process that we can send to other parts of the country."

In a country where 70 per cent of the rivers are too polluted to provide drinking water, the technology is likely to be a money-spinner. Having ruined vast swathes of its countryside as it raced to wealth, China is now likely to spend billions on cleaning up the mess.

Elsewhere, the government-owned buildings in the city collect their own rain water for reuse, are powered by geothermal energy, have window shutters that move with the light, in order to keep buildings cool, and heating systems that use solar energy.

In a sign of how seriously the project is being taken, eight out of the nine members of the Politburo Standing Committee, the all-powerful council that rules the country, have visited.

"The idea is to create something that can be adapted to other cities in China," said Mr Wang. "What we want to develop is cheap technology that we can industrialise, produce and sell on elsewhere. We have to change people's ideas that being green is expensive."

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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:42 am » by Cia212


It's done to maintain the government approved economic growth rate...and it's a bubble waiting to burst. The buildings are supposed to be a way to ease crowding in the cities and entice farmers into factory jobs, but the housing is hundreds of times too expensive for this to work. And they can't just reduce the housing cost because that would dramatically devalue the properties and cause the bubble to burst sooner. PS communism sux.



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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:45 am » by Kaarmaa


Well, that's not how I imagined it...sad.

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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:53 am » by Mushroom


I was speaking with a Chinese friend today and he told me that china had an agreement with an un-named african country regarding mineral rights.
The deal is China has to build schools, hospitals, houses, etc... to help the country (or regions) and in return they can drill for oil and mine for minerals.

I haven't seen any credible reports as yet, so it's just hearsay.

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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 1:57 am » by Shemagh


This is an article about the town built by the Chinese in Angola, this paragraph could explain why!


With little fanfare, a staggering 750,000 Chinese have settled in Africa over the past decade. And more are believed to be on their way.
The strategy has been carefully devised by officials in Beijing, where one expert has estimated that China will eventually need to send 300million people to Africa to solve the problems of over-population and pollution



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... empty.html

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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 6:08 am » by 99socks


The Chinese are preparing/creating their Empire.
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PostSat Jul 07, 2012 12:13 pm » by Spock


Mushroom wrote:I was speaking with a Chinese friend today and he told me that china had an agreement with an un-named african country regarding mineral rights.
The deal is China has to build schools, hospitals, houses, etc... to help the country (or regions) and in return they can drill for oil and mine for minerals.

I haven't seen any credible reports as yet, so it's just hearsay.



This I have heard as well, but it is done in the best interest of China. They are being the economic hit-man to African nations, much like the U.S. did to South American countries. The goal is to make the country become so indebted there is no way to pay them back and China claims stake in all trade, becoming the majority share-holder; so to speak. It's a way to take over a nation without firing a shot.

They are doing the same to us, by purchasing our debt and buying up companies, lands and real estate.

Sad thing is, we let them do it.


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