Wikileaks Website Down and “History Insurance”

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2217
Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:54 am

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 8:22 pm » by Smokeydog


gf2010 wrote:anyone downloaded the TPTB file and looked over it?

u cant mate no code yet
http://www.youtube.com/user/smokeydogsmokey

When people are sat on something you want you make them an enemy

Initiate
User avatar
Posts: 899
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:25 am

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 8:48 pm » by Disinfoagent007


Strange tweet from about 6 min ago

The D-notice is type 1 and type 5.


36 mins ago:

UK Government has issued a "D-notice" warning to all UK news editors, asking to be briefed on upcoming WikiLeaks stories.


Media censored over next WikiLeaks story

WikiLeaks sent out this tweet about an hour ago.

UK Government has issued a ‘D-notice’ warning to all UK news editors, asking to be briefed on upcoming WikiLeaks stories

The next leak by WikiLeaks is expected to be a release of classified US files likely to cause international embarrassment and could damage some nations’ relations with the United States.

Reports in the media say say several countries including the UK, Canada, Turkey, Israel, Denmark and Norway have also been warned to expect potential embarrassment from the leaks.

There are five types of D-Notices. According to WikiLeaks, D-Notice 1 and D-Notice 5 (1 – Military operations, plans and capabilities; 5 – UK Security and Intelligence services and Special services) have been invoked.

D-Notice 5 states:

Information falling within the following categories is normally regarded as being highly classified. It is requested that such information, unless it has been the subject of an official announcement or has been widely disclosed or discussed, should not be published without first seeking advice
http://liberalconspiracy.org/2010/11/26 ... aks-story/
quality over quantity

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2184
Joined: Thu May 27, 2010 8:55 pm

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 9:41 pm » by Redwoodrick


Wikileaks' Julian Assange shows a page from the release of Iraq war documents at an October briefing in London.
Wikileaks' Julian Assange shows a page from the release of Iraq war documents at an October briefing in London.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

* Ex-U.S. ambassador to Russia says leaks likely to damage efforts to build trust
* Leaks expected to include "cables" used by State Department
* Ambassador says diplomacy can't be conducted in the media
* WikiLeaks threatening to publish thousands more classified documents

RELATED TOPICS

* Wikileaks.org
* Afghanistan War
* Military and Defense Policy
* Russia
* U.S. Department of State

Washington (CNN) -- A former U.S. ambassador to Russia tells CNN the impending leaks of diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks could contain highly sensitive information that reveals U.S. negotiating positions and sensitive intelligence as well as confidential views, analyses, instructions and strategy.

James F. Collins, ambassador to Moscow from 1997 to 2001, and director of the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said the expected online disclosure has to be taken seriously.

"Leaking information of this kind will be detrimental to building the trust among officials necessary to conduct effective and productive diplomacy. It will impede doing things in a normal, civilized way," Collins said.

He added, "I would think the information they will leak is likely to contain analysis, records of discussions or reporting on confidential conversations between officials or official policy recommendations or suggestions about policy or diplomatic actions."

A threat by Wikileaks to publish new disclosures has sparked a massive review of diplomatic documents by the State Department. A source tells CNN that every diplomatic mission document, from 2006 to 2009, is under review as the website threatens to release millions of pages of classified embassy information soon.

The information blitz from WikiLeaks would offer a glimpse into the worldwide communications of the State Department and its 297 embassies, consulates and missions -- through what commonly are referred to as "cables."

Collins said these are the telegrams used for official instructions, reports and communications from the State Department in Washington to its international posts as well as from those posts back to Washington. Much informal communication today is by e-mail and other kinds of modern communications, he said, "but official instructions to the ambassador tend to come through telegrams which an ambassador can assume have been properly coordinated in Washington."

Telegrams, when they go out of the Department of State, are shown as signed by the secretary of state, and when they come in from any embassy or consulate in the field are shown as signed by the ambassador or a principal officer. "Obviously," however, Collins notes, "these individuals cannot and do not write and sign all of the telegrams."

Embassies send Washington "reporting" telegrams that can include analysis by embassy officers of developments of importance to U.S. policy in their country or they may report meetings that the ambassador or other embassy officials had with officials in their host country. They also can contain substantive policy recommendations and observations. In addition, there are housekeeping and operational messages that are dedicated to the daily operations and needs of diplomatic offices and personnel.

Telegrams are an essential means for keeping U.S. diplomats informed about policy and views in Washington and to alert them to important developments. The State Department sends "worldwide" telegrams to its missions around the world, "regional" telegrams to a select number of posts and telegrams to individual posts.

"They can be informational," Collins said, "telling the ambassador and his or her staff about a policy initiative, for example: They can send texts of speeches, convey in-house information the Department of State wants embassies to be aware of or provide the reasoning behind policy, what Washington wants clearly understood."

Another kind of telegram contains official instructions. "It says to an ambassador 'go take this action,'" Collins said, "instructing the ambassador or his staff, for example, to 'see so and so and seek his support for an American position on Afghanistan,' for example. As an ambassador you would take that instruction, for example and, using it, seek out the appropriate person in the Foreign Ministry and make the case Washington has asked to be conveyed."

He said, "The most sensitive kinds of telegrams are instructions such as those to negotiators. These instructions were routinely sent to our negotiators on the START treaty or to those carrying on negotiations with allies about next steps in Afghanistan."

Collins said his major concern about leaking telegraphs and other official communication is that "you cannot conduct business between governments effectively on CNN or in the news media. People with whom you talk on a confidential basis, where you're talking as government to government, or representative of government to representative of government and discussing something, implicitly assume that the confidentiality of the discussion will be preserved. Sure, everyone understands that you're going to report back to your own government what you said and what you heard, but they don't expect to see the exchange in the newspapers."

"Similarly, analysis that mentions names or says 'no matter what everyone else is saying, we think the place is going to fall apart next week' is very sensitive," Collins said. "It's not that you're trying to cover up somebody's mistakes, it's that you cannot expect people to provide their superiors candid advice and analysis if they expect to see their views politicized and made public. "

"If Wikileaks is putting out a whole raft of embassy reporting from Moscow or State Department instructions on Russia policy this is not good news," Collins tells CNN, "because these cables almost certainly will say things that will complicate relations between and among people involved, create resentments about publication of private information and decrease the fragile confidence that has been building between the two governments. It could also reveal strategies or intentions to the detriment of our diplomatic strategy and tactics on a number of issues. And it can simply make life very difficult for embassy officers and other officials working to conduct our relations with Russia, depending on how all of this is released."

In Baghdad, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq told a group of journalists Friday that diplomats "are worried about additional documents coming out."

Ambassador James Jeffrey said, "WikiLeaks are an absolutely awful impediment to my business, which is to be able to have discussions in confidence with people. I do not understand the motivation for releasing these documents. They will not help; they will simply hurt our ability to do our work here."
I have sworn on the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man- Thomas Jefferson

To be honest I'm not even sure what "alien" means. Alien to what? The universe is teeming with life.

Conspirator
Posts: 1133
Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 1:32 pm
Location: Somewhere near you.

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:02 pm » by Nakchopoe


webmaster2010 wrote:As soon as they release the passcode for the Insurance its bye bye governments, and all the corrupt will be targeted.

However, I think better to just release the password rather than keep threatening them with the Insurance file.

My advice to Wikileaks is just release the password for the file. Once everyone know's what's in the file, then they can't kill everyone, or lock them up. And of course he can go into hiding.


It would be quite stupid to release the password right now. The insurance file isn't called 'insurance' file for no reason. It is their backup for moments when it gets really nasty.

I'd advice them to keep the password secret for as long as possible and disclose the cables on another way.

Maybe the insurance files contains only 1.4gigs of blank pages. We don't know. But the good thing for Wikileaks is that the Government doesn't know either. Wikileaks got them by the balls and it would be very stupid to let go now (i.e. give away the password).

You never play your trump as the first move. You keep it till you have no options left, or, better, till the game has ended in your advantage.
.

"You watch television to turn your brain off and you work on your computer when you want to turn your brain on."
- Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Computer and Pixar

Image
.
.
youtube.com/watch?v=nLsCC0LZxkY

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 2788
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 7:39 pm
Location: Oceanic 815

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:06 pm » by Epicfailure


RELEASE THE KRACKEN ALREADY!
Image

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4463
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 6:11 am
Location: Earth

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:14 pm » by Shaggietrip


If you have the file why not just crack the password with brute force or some other password buster.
ImageImage
Star watchers,Sun,Moon or just space in interest. https://www.darkskywatcher.com/dsw74.html

Writer
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 12:42 am

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:21 pm » by Gizmodee


If you have the file why not just crack the password with brute force or some other password buster


256 bit encryption...that's why...anyone here got a super computer handy? LoL

Conspirator
Posts: 1133
Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 1:32 pm
Location: Somewhere near you.

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:32 pm » by Nakchopoe


gizmodee wrote:
If you have the file why not just crack the password with brute force or some other password buster


256 bit encryption...that's why...anyone here got a super computer handy? LoL

I'll put my puter to the task. Will post the password soon!

(think I will be done as soon as 2085, which is almost tomorrow...)
.

"You watch television to turn your brain off and you work on your computer when you want to turn your brain on."
- Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Computer and Pixar

Image
.
.
youtube.com/watch?v=nLsCC0LZxkY

Conspirator
User avatar
Posts: 4463
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 6:11 am
Location: Earth

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:39 pm » by Shaggietrip


My bad. did not know. But 2+5+6=13. Pardon my ignorance. errrrrrr
ImageImage
Star watchers,Sun,Moon or just space in interest. https://www.darkskywatcher.com/dsw74.html

Conspirator
Posts: 1004
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 11:15 am

PostFri Nov 26, 2010 10:49 pm » by Chronicnerd


nakchopoe wrote:
gizmodee wrote:
If you have the file why not just crack the password with brute force or some other password buster


256 bit encryption...that's why...anyone here got a super computer handy? LoL

I'll put my puter to the task. Will post the password soon!

(think I will be done as soon as 2085, which is almost tomorrow...)


You could use a password cracker and utilize CUDA with say either a handful of TESLA cards and/or just some high end NVIDIA cards with enough stream processors:

http://www.guapdf.com/

This is all open source software and based on how many stream processors you have, is based on how fast it will figure it out...

By my personal calculations you could have a 256bit encryption hacked in less than a month with common day products that would range from $10-20k at a maximum...I am a little behind on the most recent video cards which might have, when combined in SLI mode, over 2000 stream processors...

So...while I really don't care about the contents of the WikiLeaks because I believe this is something the progressives have purposefully leaked out in an attempt to blemish "America" as it was when it was more based on a "republic" oriented framework in an attempt to persuade people globally that "The American way does not work"...

It is blatantly obvious that this is the type of "Transparency" Obama must have been talking about...because everything else he has done behind closed doors and made so complicated (i.e. Health Car, Financial Reform, etc) that this was more a message for "those in the know" in regards to "what he meant when he said 'transparency'".

However, if anyone had the balls to DL this file and attempt to decrypt it via this means I would highly "discourage" against it... this information should NEVER be released... it would be like someone planting video cameras in your house and then a few years later just posting the "worste" of the video footage for the world to see... WikiLeaks is doing nothing to help America...and everything to make America "look bad" in my personal opinion.

But...regarding the time to decrypt 256 bit encrypted files...it can be done pretty easily now days if you knew how to do it... but then again I firmly believe if you were smart enough to know how to do this you would realize that this information is obviously "hand picked" to be as damaging as possible...and anyone who goes about trying to change "America" by stealing private/secure information and making it "public" only has one goal in mind: Blemish the American way in order to establish a case against a free world and open market...


PreviousNext

  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook