Winehouse Joins The Elusive Forever 27 Club

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PostThu Jul 28, 2011 9:16 pm » by Savwafair2012


You got better odds of winning the lottery then becoming a singer the caliber of Amy Winehouse and dying at 27


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Lottery winners are selected every week, singers of her caliber are not. In fact, you have better odds at winning the lottery 27 weeks in a row then becoming a singer like Amy Winehouse and dying at 27 to join other singers who died at 27 - Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Kurk Cobain.


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Only an invisible power can meet such odds and bring it to your attention so that you can start seeing the INVISIBLE at work so that maybe, just maybe, some of yous can accomplish the IMPOSSIBLE.

The 27 Club, also occasionally known as the Forever 27 Club, Club 27 or the Curse of 27, is the title for an epitomic group of influential musicians who all died at the age of 27. They are generally considered to have led a "rock and roll" lifestyle.


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The 27 Club consists of two related phenomena, both in the realm of popular culture. The first is a list of seven famous musicians who died at age 27—Blues singer Robert Johnson (who some critics consider to be the first member of the 27 Club), Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Kurt Cobain, and Amy Winehouse. The second is a list of other notable, albeit lesser known, musicians have also died at the age of 27


Musicians usually included in the 27 ClubThe impetus for the club's creation were the deaths of Jones, Hendrix, Joplin and Morrison. Cobain, who died in 1994, was later added by some, along with Winehouse in 2011, due to extensive media coverage of her death relating to the club. With the exception of Joplin, there is controversy surrounding their deaths. According to the book Heavier Than Heaven, when Cobain died, his sister claimed that as a kid he would talk about how he wanted to join the 27 Club. On the fifteenth anniversary of Kurt Cobain's death, National Public Radio's Robert Smith said, "The deaths of these rock stars at the age of 27 really changed the way we look at rock music." The 27s: The Greatest Myth of Rock & Roll details the history of the phenomenon.
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