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3,300 year old Canaanite coffin discovered with signet ring of Seti I

3,300 year old Canaanite coffin discovered with signet ring of Seti I

April 13, 2014 - The rare artifacts were uncovered during excavations by the Israel Antiquities Authority near Tel Shadud, prior to the installation of a natural gas pipeline to Ramat Gavriel by the Israel Natural Gas Lines Company. Among the items discovered – a gold signet ring bearing the name of the Egyptian pharaoh Seti I

As part of a project by the Israel Natural Gas Lines Company (INGL) to construct a main pipeline that will convey natural gas to Ramat Gavriel, the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted a salvage excavation prior to the pipeline’s installation. During the course of the work, which was financed by the INGL, a fascinating and exceptional discovery was made.


Parts of the coffin’s lid after an initial cleaning. Photograph: Clara Amit, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Part of a burial site dating to the Late Bronze Age (thirteenth century BCE) was exposed in an excavation at the foot of Tel Shadud. According to the excavation directors, Dr. Edwin van den Brink, Dan Kirzner and Dr. Ron Be’eri of the Israel Antiquities Authority,

“During the excavation we discovered a unique and rare find: a cylindrical clay coffin with an anthropoidal lid (a cover fashioned in the image of a person) surrounded by a variety of pottery consisting mainly of storage vessels for food, tableware, cultic vessels and animal bones. As was the custom, it seems these were used as offerings for the gods, and were also meant to provide the dead with sustenance in the afterlife.”

The skeleton of an adult was found inside the clay coffin and next to it were buried pottery, a bronze dagger, bronze bowl and hammered pieces of bronze. “Since the vessels interred with the individual were produced locally”, the researchers say, “We assume the deceased was an official of Canaanite origin who was engaged in the service of the Egyptian government”.

The clay coffin at the time of its discovery in the field. Photograph: Dan Kirzner, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Another possibility is that the coffin belonged to a wealthy individual who imitated Egyptian funerary customs. The researchers add that so far only several anthropoidal coffins have been uncovered in the country. The last ones discovered were found at Deir el-Balah some fifty years ago. According to the archaeologists, “An ordinary person could not afford the purchase of such a coffin. It is obvious the deceased was a member of the local elite”.

The graves of two men and two women who may have been members of his family were also located near the coffin. The discovery of the coffin at Tel Shadud is evidence of Egyptian control of the Jezreel Valley in the Late Bronze Age (thirteenth century BCE). During the period when the pharaohs governed the country, Egyptian culture greatly influenced the local Canaanite upper class.



Sources and more information:

Egyptian Burial Uncovered in the Jezreel Valley

Egyptian Greetings in the Jezreel Valley: A 3,300 Year Old Coffin was Exposed Containing the Personal Belongings of a Wealthy Canaanite - Possibly an Official of the Egyptian Army. Among the items discovered - a gold signet ring bearing the name of the Egyptian pharaoh Seti I. According to a Press Release by the Israel Antiquities Authority, a...

Rare Ancient Coffin in Jezreel Valley Holds Egyptian Pharaoh's Signet Ring

A gold signet ring bearing the name of Egyptian Pharoah Seti I was among the personal belongings of a wealthy Canaanite recently discovered in a 3,300-year-old coffin at the foot of Tel Shadud in the Jezreel Valley. The archaeological dig took place at a site where construction was to begin on a pipeline carrying natural gas to Ramat Gavriel by...

Egyptian coffin, gold seal with king's name found in Israel

Rare clay sarcophagus found in Israel alongside Seti I scarab seal ring

Rare sarcophagus, Egyptian scarab found in Israel

3,300-year-old Egyptian sarcophagus discovered in Israel


( via heritagedaily.com )


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