A New Ancient Crystal Skull Has Been Discovered

A New Ancient Crystal Skull Has Been Discovered

June 11, 2011 - The Mitchell-Hedges Crystal Skull is no lengthier special! Out of Africa – by way of California – emerges another ancient skull, “Compassion”, with a detachable jaw. Previously, this skull is re-carving the crystal skull landscape!

Philip Coppens

With the 2008 release of “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull”, crystal skulls attained a significantly greater stage of coverage than ever before just before. Just before, crystal skulls had only grow to be somewhat renowned in the nineteen eighties, especially in New Age circles. Today, there are hundreds of crystal skulls, nearly all of them of modern-day fabrication (most made in China) and used in various New Age-sort seminars. Only a handful of skulls are suspected of having historical origins, which includes the most renowned of all crystal skulls: the Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull.



“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” helps make scant references to the Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull. It stands out for it is by much the most sophisticated, and the only skull with a detachable jaw, meaning that whomever made this, was a grasp artist in carving crystal – ready to generate a feat that modern carvers have been unable to accomplish. Gerald Leandro De Souza, a master skull carver from Brazil with 25 years of experience behind him, notes that “the process of cutting the jaw from a skull brings about the jaw to break and is almost impossible for skull carvers to complete.”

Nevertheless, sceptics, principally led by Jane Walsh, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian National Museum of Normal Background, try to argue that all these skulls are of modern-day fabrications. So much, none of the claims made by Walsh and co. have been substantiated, permit alone supported by factual evidence. Particularly, Walsh tries to point the finger to Germany and the city of Idar-Oberstein, arguing most of these skulls were carved there by the resident artists. Even so, no information of skull carving have ever been identified there there are no data of any carver performing carving in the center of the 19th century, when some of these skulls are said to have been made. In brief, Walsh’s theories remain completely unsubstantiated – not very scientific!

On the other side of the debate are the likes of Nick Nocerino, one of the first crystal skull researchers, who travelled thoroughly through Central America, in search of them. He mentioned how on numerous occasions, Indian tribes presented skulls on sale to him, as with the funds, the regional shamans could acquire precious Western medicine and like, to assist their tribe at a time when the Mayan individuals had been subjected to genocide. Nocerino constantly refused these kinds of delivers, as he strongly thought the skulls had been these kinds of an integral part of Mayan modern society, that these tribes needed their precious talisman. (Even though he did everything to help the tribes in other approaches.)

The Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull as well arrives with a Central American origin. The loved ones by itself stated that Anna Mitchell-Hedges identified the skull in the ruins of Lubaantuun on her 17th birthday in 1924. It is a tale Anna adhered to right up until her death, although it was subjected to intense criticism from the sceptics. Without a doubt, a more likely tale about how her father found the skull is told in his novel, “The White Tiger”, published in 1931. In it, he relates a largely autobiographical account of an Englishman who is initiated by a Mayan tribe, to turn into the principal caretaker of a most critical treasure. When the Mayan priest displays him the treasure, the Englishman is led down into a collection of tunnels, prior to the treasure is unveiled to him: “Before him, piled in limitless confusion, lay the treasure of the Aztecs. Gold chalices, bowls, jars and other vessels of every single size and shape immense plaques and strange ornaments all glittered dully.




( via philipcoppens.com )