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CDC: We've reached 'the end of antibiotics, period'

CDC: We've reached 'the end of antibiotics, period'

October 26, 2013 - In an interview that aired on PBS's Frontline, an associate director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, said that "for a long time, there have been newspaper stories and covers of magazines that talked about 'The end of antibiotics, question mark?' Well, now I would say you can change the title to 'The end of antibiotics, period.'"

"We're in the post-antibiotic era," he continued. "There are patients for whom we have no therapy, and we are literally in a position of having a patient in a bed who has an infection, something that five years ago even we could have treated, but now we can't."

As an example, Dr. Srinivasan discussed the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, which recently made headlines when word spread that three players from the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers were battling it. The options for treating it have always been limited, but until the past decade, MRSA infections were rarely seen outside of health-care facilities.


But about a decade ago, Dr. Srinivasan began to see "outbreaks in schools [and] health clubs. And what most of these people were getting was something very different from what we saw in hospitals."

"In hospitals, when you see MRSA infections, you oftentimes see that in patients who have a catheter in their blood, and that creates an opportunity for MRSA to get into their bloodstream," he continued. "In the community, it was causing a very different type of infection. It was causing a lot of very, very serious and painful infections of the skin, which was completely different from what we would see in health care."

Because such infections can't be treated with conventional antibiotic therapies, doctors have begun to "reach back into the archives" and use older antibiotics. "We're using a lot of colistin," Dr. Srinivasan said. "And we're using more of it every year. It's very toxic. We don't like to use it. It damages the kidneys. But we're forced to use it in a lot of instances."

The entire Frontline report, "Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria," can be viewed here.



Sources and more information:

Associate director at Centers for Disease Control: We've reached 'the end of antibiotics, period'

In an interview that aired on PBS's Frontline, an associate director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, said that "for a long time, there have been newspaper stories and covers of magazines that talked about 'The end of antibiotics, question mark?' Well, now I would say you can change the title to 'The end of...

Associate director at Centers for Disease Control: We've reached 'the end of antibiotics, period'

The End Of Antibiotics

FRONTLINE asks: Has the age of antibiotics come to an end?


( via rawstory.com )



3 comments

  • Backway2#

    Backway2 wrote October 27, 2013 2:33:01 AM CET

    Its nothing to do with diseases or medicines. There is no money into developing antibiotics and big pharma has been trying to get rid of this non-profitable niche market for a few years now. Quick money is in vaccines even though they are usually absolutely useless. The CDC are trying to pitch for doom and gloom epidemics even though nothing real exist, just justifying their funding. Its been going on for over 40 years now.

  • properREDeye#

    properREDeye wrote October 26, 2013 3:15:34 PM CEST

    I blame the pharmaceutical industry for the early demise of antibiotics by pushing doctors to over-prescribe the sale & use of them for illnesses like viruses they cannot cure. Yes, you could look to overprotective parents and point the finger for stuffing their kids full of the latest antibiotics, giving the organism a chance to develop immunity to that particular strain but to me the onus lies with the people pushing the unnecessary use of them and profiting wildly from it. It is too late to have any significant effect now but children grow up to have a better immune system if their body is left to fight off illnesses by itself (within reason), not pumped full of drugs but that is the default for many parents these days

  • Sevens#

    Sevens wrote October 26, 2013 12:17:56 PM CEST

    Might have to go into bacterial electrocution therapy using electricity, a frequency charge that resonates to the particular electrical potential of the particular bacteria of interest and them burst them suckers. People get electrocuted so does bacteria and viruses.

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