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Milan Creates the Worlds First Vertical Forest

Milan Creates the Worlds First Vertical Forest

January 31, 2014 - In an age where harmonious innovation is becoming more celebrated, sustainable designs to preserve the Earth and contribute to wellbeing are being implemented at a rapid rate. One such innovation to recently be accepted for development is a vertical forest designed by Stefan Boeri Architects.

The first ever vertical forest will soon be the greenest building in Milan. Because the average household in a city produces approximately 25-30 tons of CO2 per year, implementing greener architecture in highly populated areas cannot come soon enough.


This stunning development is part of a vision presented by BioMilano which promises to incorporate 60 abandoned farms into a greenbelt surrounding the city. Part of the mission is to create a vertical forest building which boasts a stunning green faade planted with dense forest systems to provide microclimate and to filter out polluting dust particles. According to Inhabit, there are two buildings currently under construction.

Credit: Carlo Alberto Mari

This stunning development is part of a vision presented by BioMilano which promises to incorporate 60 abandoned farms into a greenbelt surrounding the city. Part of the mission is to create a vertical forest building which boasts a stunning green faade planted with dense forest systems to provide microclimate and to filter out polluting dust particles. According to Inhabit, there are two buildings currently under construction.

The greener architecture will help absorb CO2, oxygenate the air, moderate extreme temperatures, and lower noise pollution. The bio-canopy is not only aesthetically pleasing to the eye, but it helps lower living costs.

Credit: Carlo Alberto Mari

In the vertical forest building, each apartment balcony will feature trees that will provide shade during the summer months and drop their leaves in winter and allow more sunlight. An estimated 900 trees are planned for planting between the two new buildings being constructed.

Credit: Carlo Alberto Mari

A grey-water filtration system (which is used water which has gone down the sink or shower) will ensure the trees are adequately watered. Additionally, photovoltaic power generation will help provide sustainable energy to the building.

Credit: Carlo Alberto Mari

Merging the hottest sustainable technologies with revolutionary design will not only help the environment, but help bring human beings and nature back into harmony.

carloalbertomari.com



( via trueactivist.com )



2 comments

  • missamandamanhattan#

    missamandamanhattan wrote February 1, 2014 5:11:00 AM CET

    I thought trees needed soil and depth for their roots to find water. I can't help but think that it looks appealing to the eye but that the trees will suffer without adequate soil - and - for their roots to spread deeply as nature intended.

    Much Peace - Amanda

  • Pateriot#

    Pateriot wrote January 31, 2014 4:48:32 PM CET

    WT? High-rise buildings of trees to offset CO2 emissions? First emit massive CO2 building the high-rise, then spend many more maintaining them, so they will use absorb a portion of what you are releasing. We are going off the deep end over a Leftist man-made global warming scam!!!!!

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