NASA: Aliens may destroy humanity to protect other civilizations

NASA: Aliens may destroy humanity to protect other civilizations

October 10, 2011 - The Guardian selected to use this image from Hollywood spoof Mars Assaults to go with this article, along with the subsequent caption: "When they see what a mess we have made of our world, aliens may possibly be compelled to consider drastic action."

Soaring greenhouse emissions may hint off aliens that we are a rapidly expanding threat, warns a report for NASA

It might not rank as the most persuasive purpose to curb greenhouse gases, but minimizing our emissions may well just preserve humanity from a pre-emptive alien assault, experts declare.



Watching from afar, extraterrestrial beings may well look at modifications in Earth's environment as symptomatic of a civilization growing out of control - and consider drastic action to hold us from turning out to be a far more serious threat, the researchers explain.

This extremely speculative scenario is one of numerous explained by experts at NASA and Pennsylvania State College that, while deemed not likely, they say could enjoy out were human beings and alien life to make make contact with at some point in the long term.

Shawn Domagal-Goldman of NASA's Planetary Science Division and his colleagues compiled a list of plausible outcomes that could unfold in the aftermath of a close encounter, to aid humanity "get ready for actual speak to".

In their report, Would Speak to with Extraterrestrials Gain or Hurt Humanity? A Scenario Analysis, the scientists divide alien contacts into three broad categories: helpful, neutral or damaging.

Advantageous encounters ranged from the mere detection of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), for case in point via the interception of alien broadcasts, to contact with cooperative organisms that aid us advance our knowledge and clear up world-wide problems such as hunger, poverty and disease.

Another beneficial outcome the authors entertain sees humanity triumph over a a lot more effective alien aggressor, or even getting saved by a second group of ETs. "In these eventualities, humanity advantages not only from the main ethical victory of having defeated a complicated rival, but also from the chance to reverse-engineer ETI engineering," the authors compose.

Other varieties of close come across could be a lot less fulfilling and leave considerably of human modern society feeling indifferent towards alien life. The extraterrestrials might be also various from us to communicate with usefully. They may invite humanity to be part of the "Galactic Club" only for the entry requirements to be way too bureaucratic and tedious for human beings to trouble with. They could even turn into a nuisance, like the stranded, prawn-like creatures that are stored in a refugee camp in the 2009 South African film, District 9, the report explains.




( via sott.net )